Timney Triggers Perfect the IWI Tavor—SHOT Show 2014

by GunsAmerica Actual on January 29, 2014

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timney03Timney Triggers
https://timneytriggers.com/

Timney Triggers make exacting aftermarket additions for serious shooters. They’re known in the industry for the precision they engineer into products that are, for the most part, already good. They’ve just released a new trigger for the IWI Tavor that will rectify the only complaint I’ve ever heard about the pugilistic bullpup. The new trigger breaks at four pounds and gives the rifle the feel of a finely tuned race gun.

Timney’s triggers are drop-in units. They require very little skill to install and can radically improve the feel of a gun. The Tavor, for example, is built with a stiff trigger. I’ve heard it favorably described as a “battle trigger.” I think that implies that the heavy pull will help prevent accidents when you’re running around like mad, with your hand on the grip. The grip, all of it, is inside the trigger guard. Even if your trigger finger is hanging on to the outside of the trigger guard while you are running around like mad, there is still a chance that one of your other fingers might bump the trigger.

timney04Yet most of us Stateside aren’t actually carrying our Tavors. Not that we won’t. We are more likely to engage in the occasional run-and-gun,or stand behind a bench at the range. And without the actual stress of battle, we tend to notice the heavy pull of the Tavor’s trigger, especially when it inhibits accuracy.

Timney had all of their triggers out at the SHOT Show, and it was one of the only times I’ve ever been encouraged to pull as many triggers as I wanted. Their booth was full of people like me, dry firing again and again. Yet there was one undisputed winner. The Tavor trigger broke clean at 4 pounds and reset quickly. It was perfect. If you are looking to get that edge on your Tavor that will maximize the rifle’s innate abilities, look no further than the Timney trigger. It is selling for right around $350.

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{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

Pops January 30, 2014 at 9:59 am

Can’t wait to try it. I absolutley hate it when people make excuses for a bad trigger by calling it a “Battle Trigger” Complete uneducated, made up BS! I picked up an expensive .308 rifle, $2800, (before tax) and it had an 8 pound gritty trigger, and I got sick of people telling me “oh, it’s supposed to be like that, it’s a battle trigger” Out of the 1800 M-16′s and M4′s in our armoury at work, never felt a trigger as bad as that. My CMP M1 Garand , 1942 M1 Carbine and my 1980s commercial Springfield M1A had a better trigger than this $2800 rifle. I put a Giesselle trigger in this rifle and never looked back. I would say that anyone who uses the “battle trigger” excuse is just repeating something they heard/read once, and don’t really know what they are talking about. (or they are from New York). A heavy gritty trigger is no replacement for proper training. I would make an exception for a heavy trigger for the small pocket pistol market- but maybe the Glock 42 safe action trigger will change that paradigm too.

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Nolan January 30, 2014 at 11:14 am

Heavy trigger does not equal bad trigger. There is an apicability for heavy triggers. The Tavor’s design uses twin trigger springs. Removing the rear spring will cut the pull in half and will cause no loss of functionality. The purpose is to ensure operation if the trigger well becomes dirty and gums up. Usually a cause of sand and moist conditions. This is a problem with AR platform in sandy environments. Before you go out and spend $350 on an overpriced trigger, remove the rear trigger spring and give it a shot. It is about 5-6 lbs, and smooth. Probably as good as the Timney. AR platforms have heavy triggers because of the military’s risk-adverse stance. Heavy does not equal bad….

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John Gill January 30, 2014 at 2:54 pm

Gritty is bad but heavy can be good. Have you ever been in battle ?

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Pops January 31, 2014 at 1:56 am

The convoys I was performing were during a relatively quiet time, had some rocks thrown at us , so no, I wasn’t in battle. If you were in combat, thanks for making it safer for all of us. I do however have about 30 years of shooting a LOT of weapons, old M60s, M240s, M249s M2s, M16s — MP5s,P90s, F2000, Augs, doesn’t make me some badass, just a lot of experience behind the trigger.. So I still stick by my statement in general, but I’ll change it a bit due to some good points others have posted.–people use the “battle trigger” excuse for a BAD trigger. In my case, my Scar 17 had an 8 pound trigger AND was gritty. I spent $2800 on an otherwise excellent rifle and it came from FN with an 8 pound gritty trigger that seemed to have a lot of travel ,When I inquired to other owners of this rifle, I started hearing “it’s a battle trigger” bs. I now have a 5 pound trigger, ultra smooth and breaks perfectly. And I am long retired and don’t see myself kicking in doors and clearing rooms, so I think a $2800 rifle should have came with a trigger that was at least as good as my ARs. I have heard the some of the Scar H rifles in the service are getting virtually the same trigger I dropped in mine. So finally, all other factors aside, what weight do you and (everyone else here) think makes a trigger too heavy? How about too light? Maybe we are all in the same ballpark.

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Pops January 31, 2014 at 1:58 am

The convoys I was performing were during a relatively quiet time, had some rocks thrown at us , so no, I wasn’t in battle. If you were in combat, thanks for making it safer for all of us. I do however have about 30 years of shooting a LOT of weapons, old M60s, M240s, M249s M2s, M16s — MP5s,P90s, F2000, Augs, doesn’t make me some badass, just a lot of experience behind the trigger.. So I still stick by my statement in general, but I’ll change it a bit due to some good points others have posted.–people use the “battle trigger” excuse for a BAD trigger. In my case, my Scar 17 had an 8 pound trigger AND was gritty. I spent $2800 on an otherwise excellent rifle and it came from FN with an 8 pound gritty trigger that seemed to have a lot of travel ,When I inquired to other owners of this rifle, I started hearing “it’s a battle trigger” bs. I now have a 5 pound trigger, ultra smooth and breaks perfectly. And I am long retired and don’t see myself kicking in doors and clearing rooms, so I think a $2800 rifle should have came with a trigger that was at least as good as my ARs. I have heard the some of the Scar H rifles in the service are getting virtually the same trigger I dropped in mine. So finally, all other factors aside, what weight do you and (everyone else here) think makes a trigger too heavy? How about too light? Maybe we are all in the same ballpark.

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John Gill January 30, 2014 at 3:03 pm

How does this trigger overcome the ‘bull pup’ problem? Isn’t the long linkage between the trigger and the hammer the problem. The trigger pictured seems to have the hammer on top of it? How does that hit the firing pin which is 6-8″ to the rear of the trigger?

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Marty February 1, 2014 at 2:39 am

Sorry, but I will NEVER go along with having a heavy trigger for a service weapon or one that will be used in combat. No matter what I bring to the range, I always finish up with my carry weapon. I have two weapons I use for carry and the trigger on both are identical and under 3 pounds. I have fired under stress and in thirty plus years of carry, never had an accidental discharge, EVER. I could never understand the idea that having to yank on a hard pull trigger was safer than a smooth and lighter pull you are used to. I feel strongly had I a harder trigger pull, no matter how smooth, I would have missed what I needed to hit and may very well not be here to give my opinion. For whatever it’s worth, there is nothing better than that nice comfortable trigger when someone is shooting at you, and you know right where that trigger will release.

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Keith Berlack February 4, 2014 at 11:07 am

I have the American version of the AUG, called the MSAR and if it would fit and cost half as much, I’d like a better trigger. Unfortunately it’s not going to happen. I’ve shot on the 2nd Marine Div. Rifle & Pistol Team and countless other heavy trigger weapons and have gotten pretty good at trigger control, but I think that there is no good reason to have a trigger any heavier than four pounds and I would favor a two pounder even more! Several of my varmint guns have two once triggers that I find very controllable once you have taken the time to train your finger , just like training your toe for driving a stick shift transmission !

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NICK February 4, 2014 at 9:42 pm

I purchased a Browning Rifle bolt action , I was told it had a fully adjustable trigger . Was I fooled . Called Browning and was told what you see is what you get . Looked every where cannot find a kit or replaceable trigger . The rifle itself is great but not happy with Brownings false advertisement on there product .
No matter how you try you cannot bring the trigger down from 3.5 lbs

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Chris February 19, 2014 at 2:14 pm
TC March 29, 2014 at 9:13 pm

I have to agree with Marty. Just got back from the range with my two favorite rifles – an AR10 with Geissele SSA two stage trigger and a Tavor. After a couple hundred rounds through the Tavor, it took me a few rounds to get my finger reacquainted with the SSA. In my opinion, consistency is safer (always a first consideration) and more accurate.

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January 29, 2014