1.5″/25yd Groups Guaranteed 1911- Accuracy X –New Gun Review

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We’re back again with another installment in our continuing coverage of mind-blowing 1911s. If you’re looking for a rock solid gun made from the best American made components, you should check out Accuracy X. The brand is well known on the competition circuit. The gunsmiths at Accuracy X have dozens of National, Regional and State level championship titles to their credit. Just last year, an Accuracy X gun won the Bianchi Cup Metallic Championship and the .45 Caliber National Championship at Camp Perry (Master Class). Their new Pro Series takes the company’s legendary competition expertise and packages it pistols meant for daily carry.

If I had to choose one of the three, it would be the Guardian.

If I had to choose one of the three, it would be the Guardian.

Accuracy X

For this review, I’ve been working with Steve Huff, President of Accuracy X. He has a long history of competitive shooting. As a competitor, Huff continually ran across 1911s with personality issues. Some didn’t like to get dirty. Others hated the cold. Some  shooters consider the venerated Browning design to be a divine gift, perfect in every way. Not Huff. His practical experience with guns that were supposed to be the best-of-the best showed him there was still room to improve on the 1911. And now he has his chance with Accuracy X.

Huff’s first concern was quality control. Companies that make their own parts can keep tabs on quality more easily. Accuracy X makes their own slides and frames and machine them from drop forged steel. There are no cast parts in their guns. All of the parts for the guns, even the ore itself, comes from the United States.

And Accuracy X isn’t churning out guns, either. At this point in the review, you may have noticed that the Buy-Now-On-GunsAmerica link at the top of the page takes you to Accuracy X. There are no pistols for sale with GunsAmerica stocking dealers (at least none that we could find on the site). Accuracy X makes a limited number of guns per year, and those guns sell. The guns are all made by hand and none of the process is rushed. If the pistols don’t meet the performance expectations in the Accuracy X guarantee, the guns go back to the workbench.

And though they proof test guns (something that I would recommend for all gun makers), they don’t stop there. They do long term testing, too, and monitor the way their design innovations and materials wear over time. If parts wear unevenly, they’re reexamined. If accuracy begins to degrade–back to the bench. They’ve got a gun now that they’ve put more than 10,000 rounds through in just a couple of months. All of this allows them to do what I only wish I could do in a review like this.

The Guardian.

The Guardian.

The Pro Series

Unlike some 1911 manufacturers that dress up their pistols, the Accuracy X Pro Series guns are meant to serve. These aren’t designed to be safe queens. In executing the tedious machinations of my Editorial role, I’ve run across some expensive guns. Most of them are beautiful, but not ones I’d want to carry on a daily basis. They seem like dress guns–meant to be worn with a tuxedo and a Rolex. I’m on the other end of that spectrum. I don’t accessorize. Ever. I don’t even own a watch. I’m a bluejeans and boots sort of guy, and if I have to dress up, there might be buttons on my shirt. There are not very many high-end 1911s that fit with that aesthetic. And if I’m crawling up under my jeep to work on something, I’m likely to take off my gun and put it in the toolbox. As I’m often driving around with my holster on, I’ll tuck my gun between the console and the seat. You see where I’m going with this. Daily carry means wear and tear. I tend to baby the expensive things I own, and you can’t baby a daily carry pistol. You can’t. You carry it. It doesn’t carry you.

These new Pro Series pistols are clearly not meant to be babied. They’re meant for daily use. Not that they look like your average Filipino Mil-Spec. They still manage to look good–but I think that is a far secondary consideration. The grips fit perfectly, the checkering is precise. The slide serrations are well cut–sharp enough for a good traction, but not so aggressive that they eat you up. All of these details are about function, not looks.

So if you’re looking for a 1911 with competition accuracy and daily carry ergonomics, check out these single actions.

The Defender

  • Full-sized stainless .45 ACP.
  • Mag capacity: 8 rounds
  • Barrel Length: 5 inches
  • Overall length: 8.7 inches
  • Sight radius: 6.6 inches
  • Adjustable sights
  • Height: 5.6 inches
  • Width: 1.3 inches
  • Weight: 38 oz.
  • Accuracy guarantee: 1.5 inches at 25 yards
  • MSRP: $2,995.00
The Defender.

The Defender.

The Recon

  • Full-sized black .45 ACP.
  • Mag capacity: 8 rounds
  • Barrel Length: 5 inches
  • Overall length: 8.7 inches
  • Sight radius: 6.6 inches
  • Tactical Sights
  • Height: 5.6 inches
  • Width: 1.3 inches
  • Weight: 40.4 oz.
  • Accuracy guarantee: 1.5 inches at 25 yards
  • MSRP: $3,195.00
The Recon.

The Recon.

The Guardian

  • Short commander length stainless .45 ACP.
  • Mag capacity: 7 rounds
  • Barrel Length: 4 inches
  • Overall length: 7.6 inches
  • Sight radius: 5.6 inches
  • Tactical Sights
  • Height: 5.1 inches
  • Width: 1.3 inches
  • Weight: 40.4 oz.
  • Accuracy guarantee: 1.5 inches at 25 yards
  • MSRP: $3,198.00
The Guardian.

The Guardian.

The differences between the guns are subtle. Grips, sights, length, finish. The Guardian stands out, mainly because of its short barrel and bobtail grip. The Recon’s Blackout finish is a chemical process and not a superficial coating. As all three are made of domestic 416 stainless steel and the Blackout finish can be applied to the Guardian or Defender.

Performance

I’m hard on single action pistols. We regularly get 1911s in the door that never falter. Ever. We’ll put the guns through a pretty typical battery of tests, and run 1,000 rounds through some of them, and they won’t hiccup. So how do you tell if something is actually amiss? The answer is you push them. You get them dirty. You get them really cold. You run them dry. You feed them anything and everything, and run all of your old beat up 1911 mags through the gun. Sometimes, we’ll go so far as to drop the guns in the sand or dirt, rinse them off in puddles, shake them out and put them back on the line.

While most 1911s will run fine under optimal conditions, once you add an element of chaos, they falter. They stovepipe. Rounds nosedive. The mags stick in tight mag wells. I’m going to say something here that is going to piss off a bunch of die-hard 1911 fanatics, but here it goes–I can make a 1911 fail in circumstances that most polymer framed pistols just shrug off like nothing.

This was the one and only malfcuntion of the whole review process, and it was likely human error and no fault of the Guardian.

This was the one and only malfunction of the whole review process, and it was likely human error and no fault of the Guardian.

So after all of the rigamarole about Accuracy X being the most reliable 1911s ever, I had super high expectations for the performance of these guns. Could this be the Holy Grail of 1911s?

In all of the testing, we only had one problem. The Guardian (the shorter bobtail) threw up a live round as the slide dropped on the last round. The picture is included here not as an indictment of the pistol, but as a weird testament of an malfunction that I’ve never seen before–ever–in all of the thousands of rounds I’ve fired from 1911s.

My bet is it was due to a mix of circumstances. The Metalform mag has an oddly shaped follower (photo below). We had no issues with the mags, and found them to be bomb-proof. It was damn cold the day we unboxed these guns, below freezing, and we’d been shooting for the better part of the morning. So my wrist was getting sore and my grip was influenced by the fact that I couldn’t feel my fingers. I think it may have been an odd wrist movement and a loose grip. Maybe the mag. It was so odd that I took a picture of it.

After, and on at least five separate range trips, I tried to replicate the problem. I couldn’t get it to do it again. That was the only problem from three guns. The guns can flat out run. They run dirty. The run cold. I wouldn’t hesitate to carry any one of these three guns, and that’s not a pronouncement I make about most 1911s.

Shooting

No problems to report here. Check the accuracy results. The company guarantees 1.5 inch groups at 25 yards. These guns do exactly what Accuracy X claims they can do, and maybe a bit better. So this section is going to be ridiculously short.

The Guardian.

A full mag through The Guardian form 25 yards.

The Recon.

Eight rounds from The Recon.

The Defender. I dropped that last shot.

Eight from The Defender. I dropped that last shot. The sights on this one allow for better accuracy, but I couldn’t ever get all eight in the same hole!

The Guardian again. My choice, easily.

The Guardian again. My choice, easily. With this kind of accuracy from a short barrel, why not?

Conclusions

Reviews like this are sometimes painfully hard to write. I sit down at the computer with all of my notes, batches of photos, and the guns, and I start plugging away at the draft. When a gun is terrible, the review writes itself. When there’s a philosophy of use at play (like the smallest .380, etc.), the review is easy enough. But when a gun works and does exactly what it promises to do? What then?

Recoil is easy to tame, even with freezing cold hands and a breakdown of good form.

Recoil is easy to tame, even with freezing cold hands and a breakdown of good form.

I can wax poetic about the experience of shooting. I can talk about how easy the guns are to carry. If you’re a single action fan, you’ll already be sold on this one. I can tell you what sets the guns apart from the others in their class, though when you’re talking about a pattern (like the 1911) with customizable features (like grips, sights, finishes, etc.), what typically sets the guns apart lies deeper in the craftsmanship. But at this price range, the craftsmanship better be damned good. So even that flies out the window.

Accuracy X is making a solid gun. The gun is very well built. The craftsmanship is above reproach. The fit and finish is superb and, like much of their competition, the closer you get to the gun, the better the workmanship looks. The price for this level of performance is also exactly what you’d expect, and right in line with the majority of the high-end shops.

I’m impressed with the company’s dedication to quality. They’re going out of their way to source from American suppliers–down to the ore itself. They’re not just building guns, they’re testing their own designs so the guns evolve as the institutional knowledge builds. And they’re pushing what is already a celebrated design to new levels of unfailing perfection.

Read on. Look through all of the photos below, and watch the videos I’ve linked in at the end. It’s worth it.

There is one more thing that sets Accuracy X apart. Because they’re a small shop, the smiths at Accuracy X can pay very close attention to every detail of construction. There are no corners cut to meet quotas. There is no rushing the process at all. And if there’s ever a problem with the way a gun runs, there’s no corporate bullshit standing between you and an immediate solution.

In the end, at least for me, this review is going to come down to this–as the reputation of Accuracy X continues to grow, these guns are only going to be harder to find. And the price may climb, too. There are just two spokes to this wheel: supply and demand. As demand increases–which it will–Accuracy X can increase supply. This is the typical path, and the one that often leads to lax quality control. My bet is that demand will increase and Accuracy X will keep doing what they’re doing. So now’s the time. Get in on the proverbial ground floor of the Pro Series guns. If our experiences with these pistols is any indication, you won’t be disappointed and the purchase price will be a sound investment.

Editor’s Note: Accuracy X pistols are currently sold through the company. There are not very many on the secondary market, as those who own them aren’t inclined to sell. They’re currently looking for dealers interested in carrying the Pro line of 1911s. If any of you FFLs out there want more information, contact the company and get some details.

The ambi safety on the Recon.

The ambi safety on the Recon requires a bit more room on the grip.

The rear sight on the Guardian.

The rear Novak sight on the Guardian.

The trigger on the Guardian breaks at XX pounds.

The trigger on the Guardian breaks at 4.5 pounds.

The trigger on the Defender breaks at XX pounds.

The trigger on the Defender breaks at 5 pounds.

The top side of the Defender's Kensight sight.

The top side of the Defender’s Kensight sight.

The back of the Defender's sight is a clean, flat black.

The back of the Defender’s sight is a clean, flat black.

The sight from the side.

The sight from the side.

The tactical sight on the Recon is low drag. While I like the back side, I'd rather have a shelf on the front to help in one handed racking.

The tactical sight on the Recon is low drag. While I like the back side, I’d rather have a shelf on the front to help in one handed racking.

The view along the sight radius.

The view along the sight radius.

The rear sight on the Guardian.

The rear sight on the Recon.

The Recon broken down.

The Recon broken down.

The rifling in the Recon's barrel.

The rifling in the Recon’s barrel.

The Accuracy X.

The Accuracy X X.

The Recon in a Bravo Concealment holster.

The Recon in a Bravo Concealment holster. It is perfect for the gun.

The backside of the Bravo Concealment holster.

The backside of the Bravo Concealment holster.

The grips on the defender are very aggressive.

The grips on the defender are very aggressive.

The mags fit flush on the defender.

The mags fit flush on the defender.

The black finish on the hammer adds a nice accent.

The black finish on the hammer adds a nice accent.

The grips on the Guardian are far less aggresive, but they still offer a solid texture.

The grips on the Guardian are far less aggressive, but they still offer a solid texture. They’re cut like a single-cut file.

check out the serial number.  We're getting a very early look at these.

Check out the serial number. We’re getting a very early look at these.

Check out the fit.

Every aspect of the gun is mated together for a perfect fit.

The solid aluminum triggers are a nice touch, too.

The solid aluminum triggers are a nice touch, too.

The checkering on the backstrap stops at the bobtail.

The checkering on the backstrap stops at the bobtail.

The Recon has a flared mag well, but came with a typical 8 round mag. I think it was a simple oversight.

The Recon has a flared mag well, but came with a typical 8 round mag. I think it was a simple oversight.

The finish on the Recon isn't an overlay. It is the product of a chemical reaction...

The finish on the Recon isn’t an overlay. It is the product of a chemical reaction that turns the stainless black.

The Recon's rail.

The Recon’s rail.

The checkering on the front strap is very fine.

The checkering on the front strap is very fine.

Side view of the Recon's frame and slide.

Side view of the Recon’s frame and slide.

Black on black at the back of the Recon.

Black on black at the back of the Recon.

Checkering detail.

Checkering detail.

Backstrap checkering.

Backstrap checkering.

Slide serrations on the Recon are on the rear and the front of the slide.

Slide serrations on the Recon are on the rear and the front of the slide.

The fit is exacting, even on the slide stop.

The fit is exacting, even on the slide stop.

Full length guide rod and matched barrels.

Full length guide rod and matched barrels.

The logo and serrations on the front of the Recon.

The logo and serrations on the front of the Recon.

My OCD wants the bevels on the grip to match the angles on the frame.

My OCD wants the bevels on the grip to match the angles on the frame. But check out how perfectly the outside row of checkering is cut in half. That is good work.

The Guardian's rear sight.

The Guardian’s rear sight.

The front sight on the Guardian.

The front sight on the Guardian.

Having all three on the range .

Having all three on the range .

I love the way the Guardian balances and I'm a sucker for a bobtail grip.

I love the way the Guardian balances and I’m a sucker for a bobtail grip.

The Metal Form mags work well, though the shape of the follower will leave you scratching your head at first.

The Metal Form mags work well, though the shape of the follower will leave you scratching your head at first.

The rounded follower pushes the last round up a bit higher.

The rounded follower pushes the last round up a bit higher.

The oddly shaped follower is one piece of steel, and doesn't tilt.

The oddly shaped follower is one piece of steel, and doesn’t tilt.

The Guardian again.

The Guardian again.

The xx.

The Defender. One round slightly out.

Seven in, one out again.

Seven in, one out again.

The Recon.

The Recon.

Even from the holster, the Recon puts rounds right on the spot.

Even from the holster, the Recon puts rounds right on the spot.

{ 34 comments… add one }
  • Tob May 1, 2016, 10:08 am

    Weel, I got my Recon and sure enough it makes one hole at 25 yards and smaller than 1 1/2″. In fact I covered the 6 rounds hole with a nickel, about 3/4″.

  • Carl Flowers July 31, 2015, 4:06 pm

    The gun is shooting 1.8 inches at 100 yards! I know you say “hell, I’ll use my rifle if I’m shooting that distance!”What if it’s an active shooter situation and since you are not walking around with one over your shoulder, that’s not an option. Your polymer, 500.00 dollar rattle trap that can’t touch the silhouette at that distance! If that is all you have I guess you’d be sh!t out of luck. At least I might have a chance with that Accuracy X or Nighthawk that you all put down.
    I’ve got numerous Kimbers from their custom shop and my best friend has bought 3 nighthawks and is waiting on an Accuracy X Guardian. I love my Kimbers but the Nighthawks are just a step above, I’ve put the lead down range to prove it. Cant wait to see how the Guardian compares to my Super Carry.
    I still don’t know how you can negatively critique something you have never fired… but when accuracy really counts, I’ll take the most accurate “tool” every time. Not everyone can afford one I understand this, but stop bemoaning them just because you can’t. If you ever get ahold to one for keeps, the rattle traps will sit in the safe! That’s what happened to the Glocks I own. Looking forward to trying out that Guardian when it’s finished by the single expert gunsmith at Accuracy X. Haters are always gonna hate! lol

  • Andrew Ling May 11, 2015, 8:54 am

    Yes, I ordered a Guardian from Steve Huff. He has dedicated himself in the art of shooting and gun making.
    The products him and his people produce are American quality craftsmanship. Accuracy of the pistols are
    just the bonus. The finished products will merit collection. I will likely shoot a few rounds with it.
    Yes, I also own many other fine, and accurate 1911s. Please keep your criticisms to a civil level.
    The fact that there are cheaper and seemingly better made 1911s are not the issue here.
    The issue is how well we will like the Accuracy X pistols once we owned and tried them.

    • Tob May 11, 2015, 6:53 pm

      Andrew I ordered a 45 cal. Recon from Steve. Hope to get it before too long. The above article interested me. I’m like the writer, but not a blue jeans type, I wear overalls and I do wear a watch, TimeX but I liked his points about the utility of the guns and workmanship on them. The other thing I liked was the time I spent corresponding with Steve and his readiness to furnish me information. I’ll carry it and every now and then shoot at a wild hog.

      • Andrew August 7, 2015, 8:20 am

        Tob, Interesting that you have hogs to shoot! I now wear a 5″ Clark Combat that’s been worn out and updated after about 15 years of normal use. The updating required the replacement of the slide and tuned up to about 3.5 inches at 50 yards. This pistol as the 1918 body and it is still very good with the new Black Diamond ion bonded finish.
        I am sure the Guardian from Accuracy X will be a better carry. 1 inch shorter but better accuracy and function, what more can I ask? Hope you get your Guardian, soon. Mine is nearing completion after about 6 months of waiting.
        Keep me posted how you do when get yours.

        • Tob May 1, 2016, 12:59 pm

          Andrew, I received my Recon and it did shot tighter than 1 1/2″. 6 Round hole was covered by a nickel. About 3/4″ @ 25 yards.

  • bill hock February 17, 2015, 12:52 pm

    You can still find on GB, Colt 70 series NM like new–that will shoot with these gun,but can almost get [2] colts for the price of one of these 3k guns,thats what i shoot,& a PARA P-14 limited from Canada &a couple of KIMBERS one in 10mm &one in45 they will all shoot better than i can for a hole lot less!!—hock

  • Chad Becker February 17, 2015, 3:52 am

    Yeah!! A 1911 for $3,000…again…awesome…really. Why? (rhetorical ). You could, I don’t know, practice and achieve a high level of proficiency with your chosen weapon rather than attempting to buy it. Of course that takes time and dicipline.

  • Frederick the Terrible February 16, 2015, 10:20 pm

    Very nice looking pistols. I have to ask, though, what’s the performance difference between this and a Kimber, Springfield Armory or Para? I can get an accurate Para for less than half of that, with a larger capacity mag. A Kimber Eclipse costs nearly $1000 less, has been around for 13 years and is proven, and comes chambered in 10mm if you want it. And it has a skeletonized trigger. (What kind of high end 1911 doesn’t have a skeletonized trigger?) And the Eclipse is way more pistol than you need for self-defense.

    This may be the best engineered and built 1911 out there, but I still have to ask why I should pay more than 1.5x as much as a Kimber Eclipse for it? If I want a concealed carry ‘officer’ 1911, I’ll go with the Kimber Super Ultra Carry HD, although the first thing I would do is have my gunsmith replace the solid trigger with a Wilson Combat skeletonized trigger. And save over $1200, almost enough to buy an LRCW M4 clone.

    • Tob April 25, 2015, 4:49 pm

      A solid trigger is an option on Wilson CQBs. Over on the 1911 forum their are a lot of pictures with solid chosen.

  • Rick B February 16, 2015, 9:12 pm

    I’de rather buy 6 glock 23’s and would save money

  • Fonz February 16, 2015, 8:43 pm

    Yea, just another “tool” for the tools with too much $$ in their hands. Lol

  • Juan February 16, 2015, 6:17 pm

    I will agree 3000 is wow high for a new gun or any gun at that. The group is awesome but do you need all the rounds to hit at 1.5 of an inch from each other ?! Maybe I’m old fashioned but I am more interested in the rounds to that are still capable of penetrating body armor like the 5.7×28 or even the old retired round 7.62×25. My 90 year old Ortgies can drop all rounds in a 5 inch circle at 25 yards and I am proud. Some of the comments on here are a little rough on a the gun having a failure.. Well hell if you want a gun that is guaranteed to fire 100% of the time then call “I Dream of Genie” ! All guns can fail sorry to say. Also if you need to keep your family safe with better than 1.5 grouping then maybe a revolver would be best for you since failure is your main concern. But then its probably not enough rounds for a guy who needs 15 and 1,, well like a Vietnam Veteran told me, ” Shot Placement” is key.. Well maybe some commenters will design a better than ever, better than John Browning, non failing, 1.5 @100 yard pocket pistol for $1000.00 or less,free delivery in any color and configuration for your happiness, o wait maybe they will just dream and bitch about something they could never accomplish. Great job Accuracy X for taking the time and effort to make a change in stead of just typing complaints in a chair at the computer 😉

  • bill brockmeier February 16, 2015, 1:46 pm

    As an aside about accuracy and not meant as a comparison with the X guns in this review. A while back S&W made the model 52 in .38 Special (wadcutters only). It was guaranteed by S&W to shoot 1.5″ at 50 yards. I have two and they still do. Made a Gold Cup look like junk! S&W made a .45 prototype of the 52 to the same accuracy requirements. For reasons unknown it was decided not to produce it.

  • Russ February 16, 2015, 1:31 pm

    For 1911’s they seam real nice and clean.
    $3,000.00 is too much to spend on a modern pistol, I could buy 5 or 6 others.
    Or an antique revolver. Come to think of it, 1911’s are antiques. LOL.
    Maybe if someone came up with a new design and called it a; 2015′<—-naaa, still too much.

  • Damon February 16, 2015, 1:16 pm

    When I’m brutally honest with myself, I’m forced to admit that the vast majority of modern handguns are more capable than what I am able to produce with them as a shooter. I have astigmatism in my left eye, and a small but uncontrollable tremor in both hands as a legacy of a seriously misspent youth.
    That being said, while I fully support the American-from-the-dirt-forward approach that Accuracy X is pursuing with their firearms, I can’t support it financially. What good is a 6″ MOA handgun to a shooter barely capable of 8″ MOA? Especially when the gun in question retails for enough to purchase 2 or sometimes 3 “lesser” examples from other manufacturers with exactly the same features and configurations?
    I don’t know. Like many previous posters, I wish Accuracy X well, but am extremely unlikely to ever be a customer. Best of luck, gentlemen.

  • ED February 16, 2015, 12:08 pm

    I own a Wilson, 2 Guncrafter Ind, 4 Nighthawk Customs, a Dan Wesson, Colt, Safari and 2 Kimbers. I have owned several others including Armscor. (I have not owned a full custom at $6000 plus.) I can appreciate and see value in each of these guns, whether they are a $400, $1000, $2000 or $3000 plus unit. Obviously, I expect more at $4000 than I do at $400. I’m sure that Accuracy X will find a market share in the semi-custom price range given continued improvement and attention to QC. As eluded to above, time, supply and demand economics and competition among these manufacturers will ultimately set market prices. I look forward to seeing these show up at my local range so I can see them in person. Who knows, I may end up “needing” one.

  • trini February 16, 2015, 10:21 am

    Ok, I’ve heard most of you not liking the gun. Everyone is entitled to having an opinion, here’s mine Kimbers are overrated the older ones were nice and worth owning ,they were hand crafted one by one but now there mass produced and have lost quality!! Watches are watches Timex,Seiko, time pieces are Rolex, Gotham, Rado, a brietling was originally given and only available when you purchased there car. How can you insult and criticize something you haven’t tried. I’ve owned Colts, Kimbers, Detonics,Ed Brown, and Wilson Combat, did I carry any? No, reason being if you shoot someone your gun will be confiscated, etched with case# put in a property room that is not temperature controlled so your precious name brand gun will rust and marked. Most shootings happen with in 10 feet.and your probably to nervous or scared to take aim! I read the article the company is not new they are known in the competitive shooting circuit, they are new to the 1911 market. I would have to do my research wait for a bit, see how they develop, talk to a few people who actually own one. Try one my self to see how it shoots before I insult and bash on pricing and product. I wish Accuracy X Luck!!! And if any one does purchase one please let me know your opinion thanks

    • JRH February 16, 2015, 11:31 am

      I don’t think most, well maybe some, we’re bashing the gun. It was more a question of cost. You are somewhat correct about the mass produced Kimbers, all four of mine were built in the 90’s with the exception of one that was a factory replacement two years ago, and it works like a Swiss clock.
      I’de like to think Kimber has overcome it’s external extractor fiasco. Mass produced or not, and what gun is not mass produced, custom or not, Kimber was the first company to set the standards for a custom 1911 at reasonably affordable prices, and I can’t help to be partial to the brand.

    • Ivan the Terrible February 16, 2015, 10:29 pm

      I tend to carry polymer pistols, (never Glock), for CCW, for several reasons–they work and if you lose one, you’re not losing $3000. Although I am kind of attached to my Walthers.

  • Dave514 February 16, 2015, 8:44 am

    1.5″ at 25 yd, that’s 3″ at 50.For about the same money I’ll buy a Les Bear that guarantees 2″ at 50 yd. Even with that I might switch oout the barrel and drop in a buddy of mine’s Fred Kart barrel

  • JRH February 16, 2015, 8:42 am

    I wish this start-up company all the best. I personally own a mixed bag of Kimber’s, Sig’s, and S&W 1911’s, and while they are not inexpensive hand guns they come nowhere near a 3k price range but they are all accurate, dependable, and I trust them. I will not keep a hand gun, for carry purposes, that is not dependable.
    At the 3k price range this company will be dedicated to a small niche of shooters to whom cost is not relevant or think it will give them an edge in competition. Just hope there is enough of them to keep them in business.

  • Cobalt327 February 16, 2015, 8:14 am

    Was the comment “Not that they look like your average Filipino Mil-Spec.” really necessary when you’re reviewing a freaking $3K gun??? To imply a Filipino 1911 isn’t on a par w/the $3K X-guns should be a given. For that matter the same could be said for any number of 1911s- including any manufacturer of a ‘Mil-Spec’ 1911. But it seems the Filipino 1911s are singled out for cheap shots more often than other 1911s- 1911s that IMO are inferior to some of the Pilipino 1911s.

    • Gary February 18, 2015, 4:24 pm

      So sorry, but my Citadel Officer size model gives me between 1.5″ – 2″ at 25 yds also for a lot less ($469) all steel and a wonderful well balanced weapon. I can a lot extra stuff for 2500.

  • Roy February 16, 2015, 8:11 am

    I have to agree with the other posts with one more caveat: I do wear a watch – it is my only jewelry so while I am willing to part with a decent amount of cash for a watch, it darn well better look like a decoration it is intended to be if I spend over $1000 to know what time it is (never buy a Rolex, 1/2 of them are fakes anyway – want a nice watch, look at Ball or Brietling). Like my watches, I am willing to pay for quality and looks (must have both). I keep a “dailey wear” watch and if I had to buy a top end 1911 at this price, I want it to have both form and function. That said, I love the write-up (review) and definitely want to handle one of these guns at least once, but for me, the sweet spot would be a gun of this function with a price tag closer to half what they are asking. It would still cost double the guns it looks like, but we would all pay for performance.

  • Conservative Paul February 16, 2015, 8:07 am

    Just what the US needs, more over priced 1911’s…… After owning a Rock Island Armory I realize now that a well made, reliable 1911 doesn’t need to cost more than $1000. Foolish pricing for a company that nobody has even heard of, but then again there are more millionaires in the world than ever before.

  • Kimber February 16, 2015, 6:59 am

    Looks nice but I like having the options of a double stack mag for a lot less cash.

  • David McDaniel February 16, 2015, 6:38 am

    Love this. Can I order one commander chambered in 9mm with the black finish?
    Thank you.
    David

  • Bob Goodheart February 16, 2015, 5:52 am

    Nice pistols but 3 grand for a hand gun you have to have more money then brains i can put a new barrel and balance
    a browning high power mark 111 for about 1100. dollars and shoot right there with best in the business every day of
    the week i guess there gun smith have to stay busy.

    • Bob Dani February 16, 2015, 10:17 am

      My thoughts exactly … I’ve owned them all. And the STI’s I’ve purchased works as well or better than I can shoot.

      This is just another very expensive 1911, that milled from the same metals, same final steps in finishing parts, and now trying to gain market share, at a very high price tag.

  • Roger W. Hamilton February 16, 2015, 5:12 am

    I have been a Kimber owner/lover since 1997 and I also have a Para LDA. My Kimber digests just about any type of ammo. The only time I’ve ever had a stove pipe was due to limp wristed shooting. How does your 1911 stack up to Kimber? Your weapon seems a bit expensive.

  • Donald Conner February 16, 2015, 4:22 am

    1.5″ is the best this $3,000 gun will do? And you found faults with it? For $3, you ought to get a finely crafted piece of machinery that is faultless. I believe Bill Laughridge at Cylinder and Slide can teach them the right way to fit and finish a gun. Bill is more emeritus now. But 20 years ago he built my Combat Elite with a Bar-Sto barrel and other assorted goodies. What I was most impressed with were these things: (1) he told me what I didn’t need and why, and what I did, and why, right down the science of physics and mass vs. weight concerning the trigger, where a less principled person could have seriously run up the tab; and (2) I supplied a paper bag of mixed ammunition of just about everything (3 bags nested, actually) I could find on the shelves, 5 of each. I don’t remember how many in total, but he did comment: “Goood God, Don, you’re serious aren’t you?”. Damn right, serious as a heart attack That gun was for defending myself and my wife. It had to feed everything. Just reach in the bag and load whatever you grab in random order. I did the very same thing when I got it home. Well over 100 rounds and nary a hitch or bobble. And quite a few dollars, which my wife questioned. Same reply: this thing has got to use anything you can stick in it, and I do mean anything. My father was a master machinist in the 30.s, 40’s, 50’s, and early 60’s. If it was a machine tool he could operate right to the limits of it’s abilities. Most was long before the days of CAD/CAM. He truly believed that perfect was just barely good enough. Maybe too much of that rubbed off on me. But for $3 grand, I do not expect glaring problems, unacceptable accuracy included.

    Respectfully

    Donald Conner

    • Bob Dani February 16, 2015, 10:17 am

      My thoughts exactly … I’ve owned them all. And the STI’s I’ve purchased works as well or better than I can shoot.

      This is just another very expensive 1911, that milled from the same metals, same final steps in finishing parts, and now trying to gain market share, at a very high price tag.

  • don magic juan February 16, 2015, 3:06 am

    Its a beautiful gun! But at $3000? I know it’s nice but I can’t get excited about a brand I’ve never heard of at that price range when I know I can buy a Wilson combat or nighthawk custom or les baer or ed brown ext. In that same range and I know what I’m gonna get. Not to mention, STI is building fantastic 1911s for $1000 less than most of the competition. Am I wrong? Are any of you readers gonna go drop $3000 on one of these accuracy x guns? Sorry to be negative, but show me a premium 1911 for $1000-$1500 and then we’ll talk!

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