Customized Rimfire For Fighting Dangerous Domestic Terrorists!

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For more information on the rifle, visit http://www.magnumresearch.com/.

To purchase one on GunsAmerica.com, click this link: https://www.gunsamerica.com/Search.aspx?T=magnum%20lite%20%22magnum%20research%22

Eastern_Grey_SquirrelA dangerous terrorist lives right here in our land. Folks, if you don’t know it, our electrical grid is under attack. In fact, not making light of any of the world-wide terrorists attack we have all observed in the last two years, we are facing a relentless threat that is almost always willing to die to take down our grid. This domestic terrorist is not what you might think.

There have been 1,139 successful cyberwar operations as of early 2016. This number represents all of the unclassified attacks, so who is this group of power-hating thugs? Well according to the National Security Agency, it is living right next to you in your yard.

” I don’t think paralysis [of the electrical grid] is more likely by cyber attack than by natural disaster. And frankly the number-one threat experienced to date by the US electrical grid is squirrels.” – John C. Inglis, Former Deputy Director, National Security Agency 2015.07.09

I know you are shocked as this is just nuts (sorry I could not help myself)! Now that I know, I feel that we should learn about our enemy and how to dispatch them.

If you have ever tried to keep one out of your bird feeder you know they are clever. They can defeat just about any attempts to block them from feasting the bird feed. Let us evaluate them as a means to understand them:

  • Memory and abstract thought: Squirrels are quick studies, capable of learning by observation.
  • Communication: Squirrels communicate with each other through vocal and non-vocal methods.
  • Deception: If a squirrel knows they are being watched they will pretend to bury a nut, and wait until they are alone to actually hide it.
  • Long-term planning: Squirrels will gather and hide food for extended periods.
  • Adaptability: They have learned to thrive in urban environments even though they haven’t evolved to live in that environment.
  • Elude and Escape: They will run in random patterns to elude and not bring a predator back to the nest. They will take to trees, circling the trunk and pressing themselves flat to blend in with the bark.
The author started with a Magnum Research MagnumLite MLR22H rimfire rifle. Image courtesy of Magnum Research.

The author started with a Magnum Research MagnumLite MLR22H variant from the company’s rimfire rifle line. Image courtesy of Magnum Research.

The solution has to be equal to the objective. I set to work to construct the ideal gun for the terrorist. My checklist was demanding: .22 caliber, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, light, reliable and accurate. With all of that on my short list, I also knew that I would want to be able to mount a magnified optic.

Knowing what I required, I decided to go to Magnum Research and its MagnumLite series of semi-automatic rimfire rifles. I selected the .22 LR MLR22H variant. The heart of these is the MagnumLite receiver, which is CNC-machined from a 6061-T6 aircraft aluminum forging and includes an integral Weaver type rail for optics. Magnum Research uses a graphite barrel that is super lightweight and give better heat dissipation than steel while being extremely stiff. The bolt is machined from heat-treated 4140 steel. The bolt face has exacting tolerances for accuracy and reliability.

To ensure quick reloads for when facing down a hoard of squirrels, the author fitted the rifle with a Tactical Solutions Performance Extended Magazine Release.

To ensure quick reloads for when facing down a hoard of squirrels, the author fitted the rifle with a Tactical Solutions Performance Extended Magazine Release.

The receiver of the MagnumLite rifle features an integral strip of rail for attaching optics.

The receiver of the MagnumLite rifle features an integral strip of rail for attaching optics.

 

The author equipped the rifle with a Boyds Gunstocks Pro Varmint stock with a higher cheekweld as well as a Sightron scope.

The author equipped the rifle with a Boyds Gunstocks Pro Varmint stock with a higher cheekweld as well as a Sightron scope.

Next, I added a Boyds Gunstock stock for a higher check weld. Optics would be critical; while a red dot would seem a good choice, experience has shown this mission to be more of a sniper operation. I went for the Sightron SII 1.5-6x42mm scope on a set of return-to-zero rings.

The author equipped the rifle with a TriMag system that connects three factory Ruger 10-round magazines together.

The author equipped the rifle with a TriMag system that connects three factory Ruger 10-round magazines together.

The next task was ammunition management. I selected the 10-round Ruger rotary magazine. They prove to be very reliable, but the capacity is somewhat lacking for the legion of terrorists to be dispatched. This problem was solved with the TriMag, which locks three factory magazines into a triangle shape without any modification to the factory magazines. I will confess, to increase the fun factor and in case of mass attack, I added to my kit a pair of Black Dog Machine 25-round magazines.

If you have ever reloaded a 10-22 you know it can take three hands and a trained monkey to complete. Well this would not do for my war on terror. So I added the Tactical Solutions Performance Extended Magazine Release to help make reloading easy and fast.

Practical Applications

Once assembled, it was range time. I selected my ammunition carefully; that being what I could find in my ammo cabinet. I fired the first few rounds, and seeing I was on paper some adjustments to the optic was quickly made then confirmed. Wow, that was just too easy! Now to settle in for some work. Wait, how did I just go through 50 rounds? Ok let’s get down to some work and see what groups this rifle will produce. This gun is super accurate at the 25-yard mark. I would say the hardest part is to stop shooting!

The author sights in his terrorist hunter rimfire on the range.

The author sights in his terrorist hunter rimfire on the range.

Once I knew I had the gun squared away, I prepped for going into the field. To be in compliance with the law in Arkansas, I did a quick check and determined that from May 15th to the end of February, between sun up and sundown, I can take 12 squirrels a day.

To be serious for a minute, the plan was to participate in a unique event that I have been supporting for the last several years. Wings For Our Troops Foundation was born out of their desire to honor CPL Chad S Wade, USMC, who was killed in action while in combat in Afghanistan on December 1, 2010. Wings for Our Troops Foundation provides financial assistance for Marines and Soldiers to get home before or after deployment, as well as in cases of family emergencies should they not have the financial means to do so otherwise.

With a high-power optic, extended magazine and commitment to defend our nation, the author is ready.

With a high-power optic, extended magazine and commitment to defending our nation, the author is ready.

For the last two years my good friend Morgan Holly, with the help of lots of volunteers, organizes and runs a charity squirrel hunt, with all of the proceeds going to support Wings for Our Troops Foundation. This year they raised $7,899.00! Unfortunately I was not able to take to the woods as I was suffering in Las Vegas at SHOT Show. However, my wife and daughter represented (without going hunting). Next year will be a great chance to take on the terrorist for a cause if you are in northwest Arkansas. And, you can do your part to help this deadly and dangerous scourge!

 

{ 12 comments… add one }
  • Newton Revell July 14, 2016, 6:16 pm

    Too much expense for popping the “Prince of the Treetops”. My .22LR Mossberg 146b vintage bolt rifle, holding twenty rounds, is a Squirrel Getter. But Florida squirrels are cagey – first shot they scatter. Wait ten minutes, they get active again – they have short memories. No problem getting my limit for the day. And I paid $25 for the rifle as a rusty ruin. I rebuilt and fully refinished it. It never fails me.

  • Nut Saver July 13, 2016, 12:25 am

    Squirrel Lives Matter
    🙂

    • Cleophus July 13, 2016, 5:48 pm

      No, squirrel “thighs” matter!

  • Joe parente July 12, 2016, 2:09 pm

    Looks great!!!

  • viktor July 12, 2016, 1:33 am

    I’ve sterilized my backyard landscape free of these malicious, destructive “posh rats” with a .22cal Hatsan Model 95 air rifle. I’ve recently migrated over to a Walther Terrus for a lighter more handier option that is more than enough for squirrel hunting distances. $200 for a fancy air rifle, $100 for a more than appropriate scope (UTG 3-9X32), $7 for a tin of 500 crosman premier hollow point lead pellets. Then reign down armageddon on the squirrels. If you can see ’em, they were hit.

    Admittedly, because it’s a break barrel rifle, it’s more a 12-squirrel a day as opposed to the swanky rig in this review which is more 12-squirrels an hour sort of rig.

  • BMaverick July 11, 2016, 1:06 pm

    Well, my boys and I just simple use air rifles and the pointed .22 pellets. Thus, those pesky terrorists don’t flee on a first shot if missed. A head shot though only gives them flesh wounds. An upper belly or front side shot proves to be lethal on average. All done for a cost of under $50.

    • REM1875 July 11, 2016, 6:46 pm

      Where’s the fun in that? I just got a new 45-70 to take on these damned terrorist.
      Gotta go the damned birds are in my squirrel feeders again.

    • Tom Horn July 11, 2016, 7:11 pm

      I’ll second that, Maverick. I call it, “Doinking squirrels.” In the quiet of the woods, all you hear is the spring go, Doink! More fun than a barrel of monkeys.

    • KBSacto July 11, 2016, 8:15 pm

      And, you can shoot the little varmints inside city limits. Probably not a good idea for a 22LR.

      Another option to pointed pellets is to glue tack starter gun caps into flat hollow point pellets for a small impact detonation. A friend of mine does that on his property and says it works.

  • Dan Schoenheider July 11, 2016, 10:33 am

    I had one, beautiful rifle. Lightweight and easy to carry and a dream to shoot. I was not able to find an accurate factory load. I tried everything I could buy at the time Aguila, Ely, Federal, Winchester, Remington and CCI. I tried different weights and speeds. Even tried shorts from different suppliers, subsonic and HV. I missed several squirrel at about 40′ and had some bad shots on others.I couldn’t get a good group past 40′ that you could cover with a quarter. I have a 45 year old Wetherby that I can get great groups at 75yards, the problem with it is I get light hits and misfires because the firing pin spring is too old. I really liked the Manum Research rifle, it just didn’t perform to my shooting. I sold it and now have a Ruger American-bolt action that shoots just like I want it too.

  • Tom Horn July 10, 2016, 4:55 pm

    Nice set-up, Jon. I know some folks down in the Shawnee N.F. who are just deadly against oak tree jihadists with a 10/22. But, I can never seem to shoot accurately from off-hand with the light 10/22. The front sight bobs up and down like I was standing on the deck of a jon boat in a cross wake. On the other hand, I have a scoped Savage Mark II, with a heavy, weight forward barrel, that is such squirrel harvester, that I quit using it. There was just no challenge anymore. Have since gone to a Savage model 42, and my Ruger Mark III pistol (both with 1X red dots scopes), and that has put the fun back in stopping tree rat terrorism.

    Good Luck (or skill) with that. Sorry if this is duplicate post. Didn’t seem to take, the first time.

  • Tom Horn July 10, 2016, 4:12 pm

    Nice set-up, Jon. I know some folks down in the Shawnee N.F. who are just deadly against oak tree jihadists with a 10/22. But, I can never seem to shoot accurately from off-hand with the light 10/22. The front sight bobs up and down like I was standing on the deck of a jon boat in a cross wake. On the other hand, I have a scoped Savage Mark II, with a heavy, weight forward barrel, that is such squirrel harvester, that I quit using it. There was just no challenge anymore. Have since gone to a Savage model 42, and my Ruger Mark III pistol (both with 1X red dots scopes), and that has put the fun back in stopping tree rat terrorism.

    Good Luck (or skill) with that.

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