Civilian Bren Light Machinegun – CZ 805 Bren S1 Carbine Full Review

Send to Kindle
The new Bren 805 S1 Carbine from CZ-USA brings U.S. customers a civilian-legal, semi-automatic version of this classic Czech Republic military rifle.

The new 5.56mm Bren 805 S1 Carbine from CZ-USA brings U.S. customers a civilian-legal, semi-automatic version of this classic Czech Republic military rifle.

For more information, visit http://cz-usa.com/.

To purchase a CZ-USA Bren on GunsAmerica.com, click this link: https://www.gunsamerica.com/Search.aspx?T=CZ%20Bren.

Since the early 1900s, the Czech Republic has been in a unique position regarding small arms and their use. The best analogy I can come up with is a banquet. If the banquet represents conflict, then the Czech Republic has always been forced to be the indentured caterer. They have supplied arms, rather successfully, for their occupying minders for decades. With the collapse of the Soviet Union, they were finally freed to turn their very skillful small arms manufacturing to supplying their own armies and other legitimate customers. In addition, the nation also joined the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

This brings us to the subject at hand, which is the Czech Republic’s take on a 5.56 NATO caliber rifle in its 805 Bren. The CZ 805 Bren S1 Carbine is the civilian version of this rifle, and it’s now available in America.

Handy, reliable and fully capable, the Bren S1 Carbine delivers CZ quality to U.S. consumers.

Handy, reliable and fully capable, the Bren S1 Carbine delivers CZ quality to U.S. consumers.

SPECS

  • Chambering: 5.56 NATO
  • Barrel: 16.2 inches
  • OA Length: 39 inches
  • Weight: 8.02 pounds
  • Stock: Side folding, collapsible
  • Sights: Flip-up, two rear aperture sizes
  • Action: Piston driven
  • Finish: Matte black
  • Capacity: 30+1
  • MSRP: $1,999.00

History

The first thing that pops into your head when hearing the phrase “Bren gun” is probably a visual of the iconic British light machine gun. The Bren machine-gun was a licensed version of the Czechoslovak ZGB 33. The name Bren was the English translation of the Czechoslovak city of Brno, Moravia, where the gun was designed by Václav Holek; thus the name. The British version featured a top-mounted curved magazine box, a quick-change barrel, and a unique conical flash suppressor.

A New Take

The military CZ 805 Bren in action with Czech Republic forces. Image courtesy of Ceska zbrojovka, a.s.

The military CZ 805 Bren in action with Czech Republic forces. Image courtesy of Ceska zbrojovka, a.s.

In 2005, a project to modernize the standard rifle of the Czech Republic’s military forces began. Several paths and calibers were explored. One of the projects was designated 805. In 2009, the Czech Republic’s Armed Forces began rifle trials with 27 entries. When the trials were over, there were two contenders left: the CZ 805 and the FN SCAR-L. The CZ 805 was declared the winner, with domestic production being the primary deciding factor.

Having met the needs of the domestic customers, CZ was able to begin taking the steps necessary to comply with 922(r), regarding the importation of rifle parts that are assembled in the United States. Once this hurdle was addressed, Americans finally got to have our turn with this new entry to the gun market.

First Look

My immediate impression of the new Bren was that it is reminiscent of the FN SCAR. After having a chance to actually handle the rifle, I realized that this was not a simple re-hash of the same gun. When I picked the Bren up it felt solid and tight, which is exactly what you want in a rifle of this class. There’s nothing worse than a stock that is loose or rattles with plastic parts that don’t fit tight. The next thing that I noticed was that CZ had avoided some of the most annoying things that companies do today. For instance, when I receive a rifle that does not come equipped with sights or magazines, I get the same feeling that washes over me when I pay big money for an airline ticket … and then get hit with a baggage-checking fee. I’m happy to report that the Bren comes stock with front and rear flip-up sights and two AR-15/M16 pattern metal magazines (which the rifle employs). No nickel-and-dime job here!

The all-black 805 Bren S1 Carbine is all business and quite an eye catcher.

The all-black 805 Bren S1 Carbine is all business and quite an eye catcher.

The Bren utilizes a piston-driven operating system and features a reciprocating charging handle that can be fitted to either side, based on the shooter’s preferences. The adjustable gas block has two different settings, and features gas ports at the front of the rifle for venting excess gas.

The selector switch and magazine release are both ambidextrous. Note the colored marking positions for the safety selector.

The selector switch and magazine release are both ambidextrous. Note the colored marking positions for the safety selector.

The selector switch and magazine release are both ambidextrous as well, but my favorite thing about this rifle, both on first blush and after shooting, is the trigger. It is smooth like butter and a joy to shoot.

The stock is side-folding and has four adjustable positions to fit most shooters length of pull. There is a removable cheek piece, which I simply left in place, as it tended to work well and was not annoying no matter how the rifle was fired.

The top of the rifle features a full-length accessory rail, along with a short matching version on the bottom of the forend. The sides of the forearm have two accessory-mounting spots for hanging stuff off the rifle. I counted at least four sling attachment points: Two at the front of the rifle and two at the pivot point of the stock.

The final feature that I noticed is that the Bren has a shell deflector that protrudes immediately behind the ejection port, which should be a great benefit to left-handed shooters.

On the Range

I had three main objectives going into this testing: Verifying accuracy, reliability of the piston system, and ease of use for both left-and-right-handed shooters.

The first hurdle was determining the inherent accuracy that CZ 805 could bring to the table. I decided that an appropriate optic for this task would be the Burris XTR II™ Riflescope 1-5x24mm. I have to say, this scope is just about perfect for where I see this rifle performing well, which is close to medium range.

The author topped the carbine off with a Burris XTR II 1-5x24mm. He felt it would do well with this rifle for close to medium range shooting.

The author topped the carbine off with a Burris XTR II 1-5x24mm. He felt it would do well with this rifle for close to medium range shooting.

This is a rear-focal plane scope, which means that the reticle maintains its size, whether the scope is on one power or five. This Burris also features the ability to eliminate the center of the reticle, making it easy to acquire targets in low light or while shooting and moving with both eyes open on close targets. You get 11 brightness settings that will work with night vision, low light or daylight. One of the things that I particularly liked was that between each setting is an off position, so once you decide where you want the brightness to be it is one click for “off” and one click back to the correct setting. This is a 30mm scope with a huge field of view; even at the full five power setting you still have 21.5 feet at 100 yards.

The eye relief was no issue, as you can set the scope anywhere from 3 ½ to 4 ¼ inches from your eye. Using the full-length accessory rail, I had no trouble finding the sweet spot for mounting.

The stock of the 805 Bren S1 Carbine folds to the side and is adjustable for length of pull.

The stock of the 805 Bren S1 Carbine folds to the side and is adjustable for length of pull.

Reliability and functionality are really two different things that get lumped together sometimes. You can have a rifle that functions well, but as the environmental conditions worsen it becomes more and more problematic. I decided that one of the potential issues would be working with any AR-pattern magazine. In the 1980s, it was proposed that all NATO countries use a STANAG magazine. This objective was never ratified, but the CZ 805 is touted as accepting STANAG magazines all the same. I felt like it would be appropriate to feed it as many different kinds of magazines as I could find, along with a variety of ammunition. This gun ate everything I fed it without complaint; it accepted and ran with six different kinds of magazines without a single hiccup. The Bren also suffered through countless mag dumps with only minimal hang-up.

The 805 Bren S1 Carbine comes with a sturdy pair of folding iron sights. Note the heavy protective wings.

The 805 Bren S1 Carbine comes with a sturdy pair of folding iron sights. Note the heavy protective wings.

The folding rear sight unit features dual apertures and locks solidly into place.

The folding rear sight unit features dual apertures and locks solidly into place.

I tried to recruit as many different shooters, with different physical characteristics, as possible. I made sure to shoot this rifle with 50% of the rounds being fired left-side dominant. I felt that this was going to be critical, as the gun features a reciprocating charging handle.

The Good

There are so many things that this gun does well, but there is one positive feature of the CZ 805 that is absolutely undeniable: It has a wonderful trigger. The trigger on this gun is the best I have ever felt on a military rifle. I have no higher praise that I could possibly offer, nor would I want to modify this trigger in any way.

The carbine feeds from readily available AR-pattern magazines, which is ideal for American shooters.

The carbine feeds from readily available AR-pattern magazines, which is ideal for American shooters.

Next on my “pros” list would be how solid this gun feels. This is a polymer gun that doesn’t rattle, flex or feel cheap. The fit and finish are just exceptional. The stock can be easily folded by simply depressing one button with your thumb. The length of pull can be adjusted, and when it is, it never rattles or flexes—it simply acts as if it is in the only position it was ever designed to be in.

The controls are easy to operate without being sensitive to accidental engagement—a line that can sometimes run thin. I’ve had rifles with controls that were so stiff they could not be manipulated correctly. I’ve had others that would change position or unleash something they should be holding back due to a stiff wind. This gun is exceptionally engineered in this respect.

Target acquisition was easy while using the flip-up sights, and the rear aperture changed between the large and small settings with ease.

The stock of the Bren Carbine, in addition to folding, can also be adjusted for varying lengths to adjust for body armor, clothing, etc.

The stock of the Bren Carbine, in addition to folding, can also be adjusted for varying lengths to adjust for body armor, clothing, etc.

This gun consistently delivered sub-1-inch groups at 100 yards with the cheapest ammunition I could find to feed it. When shooting fast and hard, the recoil was minimal, allowing for quick second, third and fourth follow-up shots. The muzzle brake topping off the threaded muzzle really did a superior job in making this a flat-shooting gun.

While shooting the CZ 805 both left-and-right-handed, I was pleasantly surprised that I never got that obnoxious blast of gas in the face. This gun actually vents all of the gas forward from the gas block, which I found to be quite pleasant. The ejection of the brass was well-mannered, thrown several feet to the side and slightly forward of the shooter in a neat pile, making retrieving the brass simple.

The Opportunities

The fore end of the carbine comes with Picatinny rail for attaching accessories.

The fore end of the carbine comes with Picatinny rail for attaching accessories.

I titled this section “Opportunities” because I view these points as being less than over-the-top awesome, rather than failures. I think that I could have even titled this “Things That Are Acceptable but Less Awesome Than the Rest of the Gun.”

The selector switch was difficult to operate with my thumb, but it was easy to knife-hand with my fingers from either side of the weapon. The bolt handle was impossible to catch from a left-handed shooting position without switching it to the opposite side; this could be an issue if you were to transition shoulders to clear cover and needed to reload.

The sights on this gun are good when they are folded down or when they are in the upright position, but a significant source of frustration was had by all when transitioning them from one state to the other. The controls were stiff, and the sights were rough while moving between positions. The sights are the one thing I think I would replace on this CZ 805.

When more than a single magazine was fired rapidly through the gun the front of the gas system would begin to smoke, along with the barrel. The gun never stopped running, and I never lubricated or cleaned the gun throughout the 1,000 (or so) rounds I ran through it while testing. The smoking could be something that stops over time, or it could be a permanent condition. I got used to it, but the other shooters always seemed to comment as if it were unnerving to them.

Bottom Line

The bottom line is this: With a $2,000 suggested retail price, I think this gun is a good purchase for someone looking for a top-quality .223 piston-driven gun. I like the fact that it is not a rehash of the gas impingement conversion to piston. I also like the fit, finish, and accuracy, which outperforms other guns in this class and price range in my opinion. The CZ 805 is certainly a gun I would recommend in its category and class.

The author found that the muzzle brake on the rifle was very effective at reducing perceived recoil.

The author found that the muzzle brake on the rifle was very effective at reducing perceived recoil.

The folding mechanism of the Bren S1 Carbine is easy to activate and employ.

The folding mechanism of the Bren S1 Carbine is easy to activate and employ.

The 805 Bren S1 Carbine from CZ-USA gives U.S. shooters a chance to own their own version of an amazing Czech small arm.

The 805 Bren S1 Carbine from CZ-USA gives U.S. shooters a chance to own their own version of an amazing Czech small arm. Image courtesy of CZ-USA.

{ 32 comments… add one }
  • Jimmy Drew August 18, 2016, 11:19 pm

    I just purchased this gun Bren 805 semi auto for $1800.00 and am completely happy with it… it is excellent… will it take the place of my Colt M4A1? No… 😉 But I do love it… I also have FN 17S and love that. BTW the lower is not plastic on my Bren it is on my $2600 FN!!! . I do have a question.. how do we convert the cheek piece on the Bren 805 to left handed.

  • Brian August 5, 2016, 9:45 am

    could you please stop calling it a “machine gun” in the title of the article? I mean its not like the anti gunners don’t have enough to work with.

    Sometimes we are our own worst enemies.

  • Royal Sloan August 3, 2016, 4:25 am

    Of course, the CZ Scorpion EVO 3 Pistol Rifle is only 9mm compared to that of the offered CZ 805 Bren 5.62 Foreign AR S1 is a lot more powerful with heavier rounds, but both have their counter part, Military Version.Fully.Automatic.

    These guns are all semi auto. You can’t call it an CZ S1 if it’s not fully Automatic.

  • Royal Sloan August 3, 2016, 3:55 am

    Why pay 2G’s for this CZ 805 Bren S1 semi auto rifle when you can get a CZ Scorpion EVO 3 pistol rifle with more options for only $800.00?

    • jb76 August 28, 2016, 9:11 am

      COMPLETELY different platform

  • Richard August 2, 2016, 9:32 am

    All these comments sound like a lot of sour grapes from people who don’t like the cost of quality. Well, to all of you who say an AR is better, have you looked at the cost of a top quality AR? Say from Barrett, LMT, Daniel Defense etc? $2000 doesnt go very far in that market either. The question is really how nice of a machine do you want to own? I have owned and operated a gun shop for 19 years. I have personally owned and handled a LOT or AR’s, and none of them compare to the quality of the new CZ Bren. I just bought one for myself recently and I am blown away by the quality of this rifle. The fit and finish is amazing. The action is the smoothest I have ever operated. Basically this gun addresses all the things that I don’t like about the AR platform. What does it cost to buy a factory AR rifle with a quality side folding stock? Oh, about $1500-$2000. I used to think it was insane to pay high prices for optics until I tried my brothers pair of swarovski binoculars. Now I have a pair, and one of their scopes too because I believe it’s better to have one piece of equipment that is the best money can buy than to have several mediocre pieces. This gun is the same way. If I wanted 3 rattling, loose made AR15’s with rough controls and terrible triggers I could buy them for this price. But instead I chose to save up and get an amazing piece of top notch engineering. And if the choose to call it a Bren, that’s their business, considering they built the original Bren. Have you seen the cost of one of those??

  • loupgarous August 1, 2016, 9:40 pm

    I don’t know how many other people expected a replica of a Brno Enfield “Bren” Light Machine Gun (here’s a picture: http://www.ima-usa.com/original-wwii-british-bren-display-lmg-mki-m-with-mk-2-barrel.html) but I did.

    I don’t know what’s worse – the ‘click bait’ aspect of this headline and story, or the insult to readers’ intelligence. I, and I suspect many other readers, would view a semi-auto replica of the original “Bren gun” as worth $2,000. I wouldn’t even mind if it sacrificed parts compatibility with the original Bren gun to make BATFE happy, and to make the weapon perhaps more user-friendly.

    While the gun actually reviewed sounds like a good high-end semiauto patrol rifle, I don’t think you guys added anything to the article’s usefulness by misrepresenting the weapon as a “civilian Bren machine gun,” Even on technical grounds, this is a battle rifle, while the FN M249 Squad Automatic Weapon semi-auto version you recently reviewed is what most American gun enthusiasts think of as a “civilian machine gun.” The sticklers among us would insist that a “civilian machine gun” is a pre-1986 ban full-auto machine gun legally possessed by a civilian, not a semi-automatic weapon of any sort.

  • Mark S August 1, 2016, 6:02 pm

    There are many high priced AR’s made here in the USA yet people buy them. Those who may need a high quality firearm they will spend the amount asked for. If by the comments in here I guess they all drive economy cars, for they can get you from here to there, and don’t need fast or flashy cars yet no doubt they look for and buy such cars and trucks. So instead of harping on its cost perhaps giving a constructive critique on the evaluation and the rifle. My critique: One comment was correct, the author was incorrect for BREN was taken from the first two letters from BRno and ENfield not an English translation of Brno. While the author went in detail about the scope he used, almost forgot about it being a rifle review, and the various magazines but failed to mention what types/brands of ammo that were used and how they grouped from this rifle. Otherwise it was a decent review, though a follow up review after the rifle has been used in conditions outside of a gun range would be beneficial.

  • Western Star August 1, 2016, 2:43 pm

    Wow, only two grand for that gun? Give me three, one for the wife and daughter ,too. Oh, wait, I built three ARs for that, and spent less than two grand on them, mags, optics and ammo,total.

    • Wrex August 2, 2016, 11:27 am

      You could also buy 3 Kiss for the price of one Toyota. So…..

    • James August 11, 2016, 1:16 am

      You built 3 for 2000 plus optics? Now you are just being ridiculous. If you build complete crap you would spend at least:
      LPK-$60.00
      UPK-$20.00
      Barrel-$120.00
      Upper-$60.00
      Lower-$60.00
      BCG-$80.00
      Charging handle-$20.00
      Front sight-$30.00
      Rear sight-$30.00
      Classic hand guard-$20.00
      Carbine length gas tube-$15.00
      Barrel shims-$10.00
      Flash hider-$20.00
      Magazine-$10.00
      Total of $535.00 give or take $50.00
      Let’s say $500 for complete standardized crap.
      $500 x 3 = $1500
      $500 left over for 3 optics? Ok bud. You get what you pay for. I’m all about saving money but I spent $1900.00 on my 300blk pistol build and would do it over in a second. The way I see it, you are getting laid either way but are you that guy sleeping with the fatty that nobody wants or the prom queen who nobody can have? It’s all preference I guess. I like Quality made optics that aren’t made in China. Good luck grabbing three of those for the 500 bucks you have left in the budget.

    • Wile Abcjo February 5, 2017, 7:58 pm

      2k for e AR’s. Lol. You get what you pay for.

  • Cameron August 1, 2016, 2:38 pm

    I’m sure the name of the original 7.62mm Bren was derived from the first two letters of Brno and Enfield conjoined. However, I’m sure you know more about guns than us….;-)

    Cameron
    Scotland

    • Jon Hodoway August 3, 2016, 9:59 am

      Cameron
      You are correct. I should have proof read one more time prior to submitting.
      Thanks for pointing it out.

      Jon

      • Cameron November 26, 2016, 5:08 am

        Still a good video though…;-)

  • Todd August 1, 2016, 1:56 pm

    Excellent review of an otherwise fine firearm giving me lots or reasons to not buy the firearm. At half the cost I’d be passing on it given other options and their inherent versatility and ready parts/accessories support.

  • BobbyDSh August 1, 2016, 1:46 pm

    I was looking for a semi-auto BREN gun…lol!

  • Jason August 1, 2016, 1:05 pm

    The firearms market has, in the last decade, been turned into something like the automobile market. Most people want a good, dependable, run-of-the-mill tool that will work well, function reliably, and do what they want it to do. A Honda Civic or a Toyota Camry. A Glock, low-mid tier AR, a WASR AK, etc. Well, in both markets, you also have high-rollers. People who have the money to buy something truly creme-de-crap. That’s a small minority, however, compared to the Civics and Camrys that you see everywhere. While I understand why the CZ Bren is priced the way it is, and I DO want one, being a CZ fanboy myself, I can’t justify the cost. It sucks but it’s just not going to happen.

    Good review, though! I hope those who do decide to dish out the dough that the rifle is everything they want it to be and more.

  • Tommy Barrios August 1, 2016, 11:55 am

    NOTE to Author and others: PRICE will beat out PRETTY every time!
    Good luck selling a foreign rifle $1000 over what can be found here for UNDER $1000!
    I wouldn’t mind having one but to me that is just another rich man’s/woman’s rifle!

  • Harold Bryan August 1, 2016, 11:09 am

    Sir, thank you for a well written review and the extent you went to ensuring people of different sizes tested the weapon. All too often these days, one or 2 guys test a weapon doing a disservice to the public because not everyone is their size and weight. I just wish we could roll back all the unconstitutional anti-gun laws so that the public had the same weapons and capabilities of the military. This is clearly what out ForeFathers intended. The government should be afraid of us and not the other way around. It appears that other than the sights issue that all agree that this is a great weapon. I would love to have one but it is a ways out of my price range. Thanks again and God bless America and please help the gentleman that was charged with owning an automatic AR-15 even though they found no illegal weapons when they ransacked his home. This man has served our country for years and for the government to treat him as they have is unbelievable. If you didn’t hear, he had loaned the rifle to someone who was interested in buying it. After 800 + rounds, the rifle malfunctioned and two bullets were fired in succession. Someone reported this as automatic weapons fire and the government has railroaded this man with every thing possible in their arsenal. Our government is way out of control and has way to much power. I hope and pray that this man is acquitted or the charges dropped so he can go home to his wife and 3 children. I also pray that America wakes up to the reality that the government has gotten out of control and it is time that We the People take our Country back from these integrity and common sense lacking bureaucrats. Great review and testing on this fine weapon.

    • Jonathan G. Van Winkle August 1, 2016, 2:23 pm

      Mr. Harold Bryan, I have not heard of this particular event. To start I say I don’t loan out a firearm. I agree with all you stated and wish America could get subjects such as this on main stream tv, don’t hold your breath as I would not either. America after 6.6 years of a Muslum president what can we expect. I must say these are the only two elections that I did vote republican and seems that I will again cast my one vote for the Republican running for President. I also will say in closing I fear it is already written as to the winner and our vote really dosent count! NBC,CBS and ABC gives such a one sided view and has for years, this is the only reason I pay for the second level of Direct TV. I feel Bill and Megan and Sean tell it from all sides, something the main stream do not do. I hope God won’t completely turn his face away from the USA. I do think America is in for a spankin for God, and if it happens I fully understand! Thank you and I enjoy this site. Jonathan Van Winkle Owensboro , Ky

  • George August 1, 2016, 10:44 am

    How is this a review of the Bren Light Machine Gun? This firearm doesn’t have anything in common with the storied and excellent LMG from the 1930’s onwards other than the same name. It isn’t select fire, has no capability for a quick change barrel nor, with that skinny barrel, is it intended to provide suppressive fire while the remainder of the fire team maneuver.

    • Bisley August 1, 2016, 12:23 pm

      The real CZ805 is a selective fire light machine gun (along the line of the M249 SAW, but better), available to military and police, but not us — this is a semi-auto “civilian” version.

    • Dewey August 1, 2016, 10:20 pm

      BS headline. These mall-ninjas wouldn’t know a real Bren LMG if they tripped over one.

  • petru sova August 1, 2016, 10:03 am

    Quote: This is a 30mm scope with a huge field of view; even at the full five power setting you still have 21.5 feet at 100 yards. Quote:

    Actually the invention of the 30mm tube had nothing to do with “field of view” rather it was to increase the range of both windage and elevation adjustments. The “field of view” myth is something that most people still believe to this very day in regards to 30mm tubes v/s 1 inch tubes. Larger lens are also less “optically correct”. Scientists ran into this problem when try to make very large lenses for Space Telescopes that turned out to be inferior to older Space Telescopes that had smaller lenses.

  • Mark Are August 1, 2016, 9:54 am

    A $2000 POLYMER 5.56 rifle? WOW, what a deal! I’ve been playing with the AR 15 platform since the 1980’s when Eagle Arms was Eagle Arms and not Armalite. When PWA and Olympic Arms were about the only other two receiver manufacturers. My 20″ that was custom made into a 16″ carbine back then when no micro gas blocks were available is still running great. I actually shot it 1000 rounds over a period of time without cleaning it figuring that I’d see how long it took to actually act up. When it ate 1000 rounds fine, I figured that was good enough for me. So knowing how that “terrible” direct impingement system works vs a piston system, I’d say to all your readers…unless you have lots of money to blow on an overpriced scope (Millet makes the 1-6 x 24 for under $300 and I LOVE the reticle) and an over priced Tupperware rifle, stick with the time proven $600+ AR design that you can buy from S&W, Ruger, Mossberg, DPMS and LOTS of other companies. CZ-USA needs to join the real world.

  • ToddB August 1, 2016, 9:54 am

    What is with all these vastly overpriced foreign rifles? $2000 for a mostly plastic rifle? $1800 for a run of the mil FN made AR15. $2k for a tavor. Or $1800 for a Baretta rifle? Are they made of moon rocks?

    • jason R August 1, 2016, 7:02 pm

      I’ve said it for a few years now, especially with the rollout of what many term the ‘Gen 3’ battle/assault rifles or “Post AR rifles”. There seems to be some market experimentation going on to ‘normalize’ the idea of the “new gen” $2000 carbine. It’s as if all these manufacturers and their distributors got together and decided to see what the market would bear as opposed to what was right and fair.

  • Chris August 1, 2016, 8:51 am

    This is a very, very good review. Thoroughly enjoyed the read. Thanks very much!

Leave a Comment

Send this to a friend