Guncrafter Industries 9mm CCO–Review

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At first glance, the Guncrafter CCO looks like many other 1911s. It is not.

At first glance, the Guncrafter CCO looks like many other 1911s. It is not.

Guncrafter Industries is hardly a household name. In the wide wide world of guns, the brand is known more for its audacious .50 G.I. rounds than their exquisite level of custom craftsmanship, but that’s the way things go. The .50 G.I. round (more on that below) is something you have to experience. Guncrafter’s custom line of 1911s, though, are revered by their owners, shooters who seem content to keep the secret to themselves.

Not me. When I see a gun that runs like this, I feel the need to stand up and crow about it. I’m here today to preach the Guncrafter faith, and I’m offering as an example this Concealed Carry Officer 1911 in 9mm–easily the best 9mm 1911 I’ve ever fired.

The grip is very thin, which adds to the concealbility, but the checkering is aggressive.

The grip is very thin, which adds to the concealbility, but the checkering is aggressive.

The Guncrafter Industries CCO in 9mm

This is a review, after-all, so let’s get on with it. This process began after SHOT last year. Guncrafter agreed to send us a review gun. At the time, I’d had little experience with the brand, and had never even handled a Guncrafter. For me, the conversation was like one of many I have after SHOT show every year. A few weeks later, we spoke again. This time I was down in central Florida, massacring swine. I barely had any cell reception, and I wasn’t familiar enough with the Guncrafter nomenclature (not that it’s that complicated) to understand the questions I was being asked. So when the CCO arrived a few weeks later, I was just as surprised as anyone.

First impressions are important. The unboxing was a strange experience for me. I’ve seen more than my fair share of expensive 1911s, and most justify their price points by making the guns look like show ponies. Their grips are made of this or that fossilized prehistoric unicorn horn, or their Damascus slides have been etched with the tears of fallen angles.

The serrations cut the glare and can be used as a guide for point shooting.

The serrations cut the glare and can be used as a guide for point shooting.

Not so with the CCO. Every aspect of the gun is meant for service and durability. The Melonite finish is a flat eggshell black. The sights are actually built for concealed carry. The grips are thin. The checkering is aggressive. In all aspects the CCO is a gun that’s meant to be carried. In fact, I’d call its looks modest. Unassuming.

Fit and Finish

So how do you justify the price of a Guncrafter pistol? The first thing you must know is that this isn’t a safe-queen. These guns are meant to be carried, everyday. If you spend this much on a gun, would you carry it? This is a philosophical question. Only you know the answer. My guess is that if you can buy a 1911 in this class on a whim, and do not have to justify it to your wife or husband, then you’d be likely to carry it. If, like me, you spent less buying your latest car than you would buying a Guncrafter, than you may have second thoughts about taking it out in the real world.

Look at the detail here. This is checkering, but it is exceptionally well executed.

Look at the detail here. This is checkering, but it is exceptionally well executed.

Yet that’s what this gun is meant for. It doesn’t need to stay behind to protect the safe. You have plenty of heirlooms to do that. This is meant to be on your hip. The CCO is a gun that is easy to carry. It functions flawlessly. Every aspect of the build is designed for hard, unfailing use. Even then magazines have been tuned to the specific gun.

Pull the slide back, and you’ll begin to see what I mean. It glides with no hitches. There’s no grit in the trigger. It has a clean break right above 3 pounds. The reset is short and crisp. The magazines slide in and out like they’ve been greased, but don’t have any rattle or play. The slide stop is easy to thumb up and down. Even the mag drop button is perfect. It extends a fraction of an inch farther than is typical, which gives you a lever that is easy to find and easy to depress.

The deeper into the gun I got, the more impressed I became. All of the controls are perfect. The function in harmony. And the tolerances are very tight, but so well tuned that the gun (even after hundreds of rounds with no cleaning) can still be disassembled by hand. And the internals are just as well finished as the exterior. I kept looking for something, anything, I could point to as a flaw or a blemish. Nothing. Not one thing. The slide, frame and barrel are milled from forgings. The fire control group is cut from tool steel, and even then most basic controls are milled from bar stock. Nothing is overlooked, and they take no material shortcuts.

The slide has been milled so that flat serrations point toward the target.

The slide has been milled so that flat serrations point toward the target.

Shooting

So how does a gun like this run? Quite well. I’ve known some whack-jobs who will try to convince you that a gun needs a break in period, or that a gun will wear into a groove that will increase reliability. I’m more accepting of this when low-priced guns are rolling off of assembly lines, but I refuse to accept that a quality firearm needs to be broken in. If it does, it damn-well better get broken in at the factory, before they sell it.

The CCO ran perfectly. The unassuming exterior and flawless interior combine to make a gun that shoots exactly to point of aim. The flat black rear sight has enough real estate to be used for accurate, well aimed shots. Yet it is rounded over for snag-free carry. The front edge of the rear sight has a shelf for one handed manipulation. The front sight is also black, but has a small brass bead. It is this tiny bead that makes the combination good for extraordinary accuracy and fast target acquisition. The bead is small, which makes precise shots easy. It is also brass, and it reflects light. Against the black of the CCO, it is easy to pick up–even in low light.

You want extreme accuracy from a gun you can carry reliably? That's a full mag from 25 yards.

You want extreme accuracy from a gun you can carry reliably? That’s a full mag from 25 yards.

Same drill from a different shooter, the very first time he fired the CCO.

Same drill from a different shooter, the very first time he fired the CCO.

I’ve been carrying the gun now for three months, and I have no complaints. I’ve put more than 1,000 rounds through it. I’ve tried to induce failure. Steel cased Tula? No problem. Hot +P loads? Check. Heavy subsonics? Yes. I couldn’t find an ammo that it wouldn’t run. I couldn’t find a case material it didn’t eject. I shot the gun on multiple range trips, and at a recent training class. I shot it in the rain, wet. I still haven’t cleaned it. It is as accurate today as it was the day I got it, and just as likely to work.

This is what you pay for. The gun works, it is accurate, and every piece of the build is as solid as it can be. It is a finely tuned machine, perfect for those who want single-action concealed carry.

How much does this perfection cost? It varies by the options, obviously. The CCO starts around three grand. Buying a Guncrafter is easy enough. There are a very select few dealers who stock the occasional pistol, but most are ordered directly from Guncrafter. As of the writing of this review, there is one for sale on GunsAmerica (link at top of the review).

There are many more pictures of this gun below, after the next two sections, so keep on scrolling down.

Inside Guncrafter Industries

When I began this review, I was in Virginia. Now I live about two hours from Guncrafter’s shop, which is tucked up in the hills east of Fayetteville, Arkansas. When I say tucked in, I’m not exaggerating. I don’t know what preconceived notions you may have about the Diamond State, but this will probably cement stereotypes. I turned off of a paved road an drove down into a densely wooded gulley and forded a creek. Upstream from the makeshift bridge, a log jam in the creek had been set on fire in an attempt to get it clear. I instantly began a chorus of Smoke on the Water.

As I wound my way out of the bottom land, I found a small collection of buildings parked precariously on a hill side. There were no signs to let me know I was where I needed to be. I drove well past it and turned back around. I rolled down the window and asked a motley assortment of ruffians who were perched up on the porch if they knew where Guncrafter was. Turns out this group of ruffians was also one of the finest collection of gunsmiths I’d ever had the pleasure of watching work. And this humble compound was the Guncrafter shop. Inside, there were guns in various stages of completion, and it all seemed surprisingly relaxed and informal.

The shop is way out in the middle of the hills in northwest Arkansas.

The shop is way out in the middle of the hills in northwest Arkansas. This is the view from the front porch, where we did most of our talking.

Almost all the work is done with files and sandpaper.

Almost all the work is done with files and sandpaper.

Sandblasting in preparation for the finish.

Sandblasting in preparation for the finish.

The shop is guarded by a vicious dog.

The shop is guarded by a vicious dog. Stone cold killer. Compact, too, for concealed carry.

This is what the barrel blank looks like before profiling.

This is what the barrel blank looks like before profiling. I’ve always wanted to shoot one this heavy, just to see what the recoil would feel like.

Every piece of the gun is hand fitted.

Every piece of the gun is hand fitted.

Every aspect of the build is done to order. This frame was engraved by XXX and sent back to Guncrafter to be finished.

Every aspect of the build is done to order. This frame was engraved by Mark Swanson and sent back to Guncrafter to be finished.

The Celtic designs end with the dragon's head (appropriately) at the fire breathing end.

The Celtic designs end with the dragon’s head (appropriately) at the fire breathing end.

This may well be the most beautiful rail I've ever seen anywhere. Ever. I'd have to find an incredible light to hang from it.

This may well be the most beautiful rail I’ve ever seen anywhere. Ever. I’d have to find an incredible light to hang from it.

The level of craftsmanship is superb, but still functional.

The level of craftsmanship is superb, but still functional.

While we were there, we got to see a wide variety of models moving through the various stages of production. This is almost always my favorite part of any shop tour, as I can see behind the scenes. I pick up on corners that are being cut, and ways some try to work around production difficulties. It isn’t always good for the manufacturers who invite me in.

But not here. This trip left me wanting to put down my pen and pick up my file. If I can go off on a tangent for a minute–this is what I miss about what I do for a living. When you watch someone file off a thin ribbon of steel, then fit a slide back on, then pull it off and remove an even smaller sliver, then put the slide back on–over and over until it is perfect…. It makes me want to build something. I get that itch. I want to be a part of it. There’s that feeling here, in the Guncrafter shop, that this team is building something that matters. They’re not building ornamental guns that are meant for shelf displays in ornate man caves. They’re building guns that are going to ride on their owner’s hips and defend life and liberty and loved ones. It’s damn inspiring, honestly, and you can see that the people building these guns believe in what they’re doing.

The finished product isn't about glitz and polish, but about functional precision.

The finished product isn’t about glitz and polish, but about functional precision.

The Model XXX.

The Model No. 3.

The Model XXX

The Model No. 2.

The Frag.

The Frag.

It is all about fit. If it isn’t 100% correct, it isn’t going to leave the shop.

The Model XXX

The other side of the Frag–every detail is meant for a life of service.

The square trigger guard is a nice touch that makes the angular lines of the 1911 more apparant.

The square trigger guard is a nice touch that makes the angular lines of the 1911 more apparent.

Sure grip and rapid reloads.

Sure grip and rapid reloads.

A Model XXX

A Model No. 4. For those who like a long slide.

The Model XXX

The Model No. 5

The .50 G.I.

While we’re on it, let’s talk a bit about the elephant in the room. Guncrafter made news with the .50 G.I. This is a big round. The numbers on the .50 GI are interesting. It was designed by Vic Tibbets and Alex Zimmermann, founder and head honcho of Guncrafter Industries, to provide better terminal ballistics while offering felt recoil similar to the .45 ACP. It isn’t supposed to compete with the biggest, fastest magnum loads. In fact, shooters shouldn’t even notice much of a difference.

On the receiving end, though…. Bullet weights range from 300 grains down to 185 grains. And speeds vary accordingly from 700 FPS up to 1,200 FPS. That’s a decent spread. The round hasn’t caught on like some of us would like, though, so finding ammo can be difficult. A box of 20 185 grain solid copper hollow points runs $50.70–which is more a reflection of the price of copper.

9mm, .45 ACP, and .50 G.I.

9mm, .45 ACP, and .50 G.I.

Thre three shells from the bottom.

The three shells from the bottom. The .45 and .50 have the same rim size.

The .50 G.I is a copper bullet that packs a huge punch.

This 185 grain .50 G.I is a copper bullet that packs a huge punch.

The round doesn't move very fast, but it does expand.

That is some serious expansion, and the wings are good and sharp.

Controlled expansion (right), real world expansion (left).

Controlled expansion (right), real world expansion (left).

The business end of the .50 can.

The business end of the .50 can. This is not something you’ll find in Silencerco’s catalog.

A .50 G.I. with a custom Silencerco Ospery in .50.

A .50 G.I. with a custom Silencerco Osprey in .50.

Guncrafter Industries founder Alex Zimmermann.

Guncrafter Industries founder Alex Zimmermann.

More pictures of the CCO in 9mm

The safety is ambidextrous, another sign that this isn't a safe-queen.

The safety is ambidextrous, another sign that this isn’t a safe-queen.

The flat black of the sight is a favorite of many shooters who like more accuracy than the typical 3-dot sights provide.

The flat black of the sight is a favorite of many shooters who like more accuracy than the typical 3-dot sights provide.

The barrel lug fits perfectly and can be turned by hand.

The barrel lug fits perfectly and can be turned by hand.

The front sight is adjustable, and features a shiny brass bead that shows up well against the flat black of the rear sight.

The front sight is adjustable, and features a shiny brass bead that shows up well against the flat black of the rear sight.

The shelf on the back of the front of the rear sight allows for one handed manipulation--simply catch the ridge on a holster or boot heel and rack the slide.

The shelf on the back of the front of the rear sight allows for one handed manipulation–simply catch the ridge on a holster or boot heel and rack the slide.

The trigger, which is perfect, breaks at 3.5 pounds.

The trigger, which is perfect, breaks at 3.5 pounds.

The magazine is clearly marked, which helps those of us lucky to own 1911s in various calibers.

The Metalform magazine is clearly marked, which helps those of us lucky to own 1911s in various calibers.

The trigger is the only bright piece on the CCO.

The trigger is the only bright piece on the CCO.

The trigger guard has smooth lines.

The trigger guard has smooth lines.

The checeking

The checkering is fierce without feeling sharp.

The hammer

The hammer rides neatly in the beaver tail safety, as it should.

The magazine is well built, and incredibly strong.

The magazine is well built, and incredibly strong.

The magazine release is high, which makes finding it easy and using it even easier.

The magazine release is high, which makes finding it easy and using it even easier.

The thin grips

The thin grips are deceptive. I had no problem holding the CCO, even when it was wet.

At the widest point, the grip is only 1.10".

At the widest point, the grip is only 1.10″.

After a good workout, the barrel is getting a bit grungy.

After a good workout, the barrel is getting a bit grungy.

The match barrel

The match barrel is heavy for a gun this small. But it does its job flawlessly.

xxx

Inside the slide.

Like all guns, the CCO will get dirty.

Like all guns, the CCO will get dirty. This doesn’t seem to get in the way of performance, though.

The guide rod is short, but it works.

The guide rod is short, which was a bit of a surprise.

Well oiled, still, after more than 500 rounds.

Well oiled, still, after more than 500 rounds.

XXXXX

The CCO stayed smooth and flawless as the round count climbed.

The notch in the rear sight is quite deep.

The notch in the rear sight is quite deep, ideal for catching the gleam of the brass bead.

{ 47 comments… add one }
  • Jack Frost May 25, 2016, 11:11 am

    MODERATOR: Sorry bout da first comment! I pushed to go button before engaging brain…

    No doubt that the Guncrafter CCO is a great gun. I have been shooting 1911s since 1949, the military version, S&Ws, Colts, Wilsons and the Guncrafter. The CCO did require some break in; it was so tight out of the box that I had difficulty racking the slide. That difficulty was the result of my loss of upper body strength. Like it or not 85 years will do anything it pleases!! After the first 200 rounds the gun did loosen up enough to rack the slide easily. Being a firm believer in the .45 is one thing but there’s good reason to consider down sizing to a 9mm. The review of the 9mm version didn’t say much about the recoil spring specs of the magazine capacity but did peak enough interest so I’m off to the GI web site.

    The good news is NOT ONE MALFUNTION in the well over 2000 rounds, that beats ANY other 1911 in my experience.

  • Jack Frost May 25, 2016, 11:03 am

    No doubt that the Guncrafter CCO is a great gun. I have been shooting 1911s since 1949, the military version, S&Ws, Colts, Wilsons and the Guncrafter. The CCO did require some break in; it was so tight out of the box that I had difficulty racking the slide. That difficulty was the result of my loss of upper body strength. Like it or not 85 years will do anything it pleases!! After the first 200 rounds the gun did loosen up enough to rack the slide easily. Being a firm believer in the .45 is one thing but there’s good reason to consider down sizing to a 9mm. The review of the 9mm version didn’t say much about the recoil spring specs of the magazine capacity but did peak enough interest to I’m off to the GI web site…

  • Travis Santelmann December 20, 2015, 12:50 pm

    Guncrafter Industries will build the best 1911 you can buy today. I have reviewed alot of 1911’s, and quality is outstanding!
    If you want a reliable 1911 that is not made of injection molded metal parts, then you want a Guncrafter 1911.

    When you order a gun from them, you go on a waiting list, they have several guns, hundreds being built at $2,795 to $5,000+ a pop? Im sure guncrafter industries is doing just fine. Maybe even more being built? I have no idea.

    You look anywhere online, and you cannot find a bad thing said about them. Buying a 1911 from them is not a novelty item. It is a very reliable handcrafted fighting pistol. Or whatever you so choose to do with it.

    And since when is $3,000 to much for a pistol? A scar 17 .308 cost roughly $3000 bucks.

    But, a AR-10 .308 can be bought all over for around $1000 bucks too. And everyone who cannot afford one complains that it offers no real world benefit over the AR platform. But, that would be comparing apples to oranges, and this is exactly what everyone is doing with a handbuilt Guncrafter 1911 and a run of the mill ” no pun intended” 1911 or polymer pistol.

    I finally get the chance to own a Guncrafter next month, and I am by all means no rich man, I actually stay in a single wide trailer. And I am quite content with that. I see value in a Guncrafter Industries firearm.

    And this is exactly why I am buying a Guncrafter industries FRAG, With Melonite finish in 5″ goverment size in 45ACP, no added features, just the standard FRAG.

    It took me a year to save up for it, and im more then willing to hand over $3,000 to get it. Obviously if it were free, that would be a dream come true.

  • Rick Gee April 28, 2015, 12:19 am

    If you have the money $3k is not that expensive.. If you don’t, it is an expensive pistol. Price is relative. I traded one much more expensive gun, from another builder, for two less expensive ones. One of the two was a GI # 3 in 50GI. Awesome pistol and one that will be in my normal carry rotation. The gun I traded was nicer looking/fancier, but the GI is an all business weapon. When it comes to self-defense why would you be concerned about the price of the gun if it happens to be the one that you shoot the best with. My life is certainly work more than $3k (at least to me and my family)

  • Doug B. March 30, 2015, 5:44 pm

    I have seven Glocks, three of which I bought, and four I won in matches. I don’t own a CZ because they don’t fit my hand. I have five GI pistols, in 50GI, 45ACP and 9MM and I bought all of them. They are the ones I carry and shoot the most. I sorry if my money offends anyone but I worked hard for it and I’ll spend it on things I think are worth it.

  • pablo February 5, 2015, 6:53 pm

    ilookforpistol

  • pablo February 5, 2015, 6:50 pm

    goodpistol

  • Markwell November 28, 2014, 11:36 am

    Back in the early days of practical shooting folks thought you were nuts for putting $450 into a $100 Colt 1911. Those 1970s dollars represented a lot more value then than $3k does now and was a sunstantial percentage of most folk’s disposable income. What you got for your money then, as now, was enhanced performance and pride of ownership; plus the guns from the majority of the custom builders back then (and there were a lot of them)worked and shot well. We worked hard, then and now, to finance our treasured custom 1911s. For those of you who weren’t shooting in the “70s, The modern striker fired auto didn’t exist then. Modern autoloaders are as reliable and accurate as any handgun ever made but the Custom 1911 has a certain amount of class un-equalled in the modern guns. Who in their right mind would build a barbecue gun on a Glock? ‘Nuf said.
    By the way, I also have a LW 9mm CCO; It is one fine shootin’ iron.

  • Bobby Jenkins November 26, 2014, 5:54 pm

    Thanks for the excellent review. I was not aware of Guncrafter Industries and always like to learn. I don’t understand all the hater’s comments. Some people can and will pay for quality products made in the USA, so don’t bad mouth it just for cost. I think you did a great job of explaining the CCO cost as it takes many hours to hand hone such a quality piece. I shoot a Colt 1911 Gold Cup National Match 70 series in 45-ACP and while it’s a fantastic hand gun, it still has it’s limitations. I would love a chance to shoot the Guncrafter Industries CCO 9mm but at least now I know they exist and maybe someday I’ll get that chance.

  • tom November 26, 2014, 4:23 pm

    If I want a the best 45 Auto, I would look at a 1911 design. A 9mm, and I wanted the best I would look for a Belgium Brownie Parabellum, it would be expensive, but you can shoot 9++mm ammo in it that has a lot of knock down power.

  • jerry kasha November 26, 2014, 1:12 pm

    I have one of the original CZ 75’s that came over here with the baked enamel finish,Ihave 2 1911’s all custom made the Cz is far more accurate out of the box than any one of them, and much smoother also, I paid 379.00 for it.

  • Bill November 25, 2014, 6:56 pm

    Ken – love your last comment. Count me as one of the “under wealthy”. Always wanted a Porsche 911 – under wealthy then, under wealthy now. Probably won’t buy a GunCrafters pistol (though if I did would be 10mm – and, yes, have thought about it) because can’t seem to find the time to shoot the guns I now have. And guns, like cars, are machines designed to be DRIVEN!

  • Ken November 24, 2014, 5:08 pm

    Bad mouth a gun because of it’s price…that’s stupid. If you can’t afford one, don’t buy one. I can’t afford a new BMW either but that doesn’t make it overpriced, it just makes me under wealthy.

  • petru sova November 24, 2014, 5:06 pm

    I wonder if they make a high polish old fashioned blued model like Colt used to make during the good old days when you were proud to show off your new gun to your friends. Today when I buy a gun I hide it from my friends, as I am too ashamed to show them that I bought a new made modern pistol.

  • Joe November 24, 2014, 4:27 pm

    Wayyyy overpriced. I dont think that 9mm will shoot better than my CZ-75. Doing a gun all by hand and filing may be gun for a tool and die maker student to get skills or for someone’s hobby. But there is a reason we have CNC machines nowadays. No handbuilt could ever match the precision of a machine and you can always have hand mad finishing in any gun if what you want is a different outlook. If I were rich and ready to hang that thing in a private musesum, maybe, but for the rest of us if not affordable or practical.

    • Mike November 24, 2014, 11:28 pm

      And the companies cranking out mass produced 1911’s on CNC Machines are known for making the most reliable and best shooting 1911s?

      hahahaha!

  • James November 24, 2014, 12:40 pm

    Nice review of a very nice gun. Obviously not for everyone pricewise but for those who have the money it’s gem. The whiney comments really aren’t needed on this forum. The world is full of expensive items and even ordinary Joe’s here and there buy a Martin Guitar or a high Corvette. That’s the American way.

  • Jonathan November 24, 2014, 12:02 pm

    Guncrafter guns are very nice, great quality and over priced.

    BTW I guess everyone has heard that Detonics is now owned by an Indian Tribe in Arkansas.

    • watchdog November 24, 2014, 8:51 pm

      American Indians?

  • russ November 24, 2014, 11:00 am

    I don’t have 3000 but my God—you can buy 5 of my Ruger sr 1911 for that———-I guess it might impress some people that you have a top shelf gun but I would rather spread the money and get a few different guns

  • Tim November 24, 2014, 10:35 am

    I won a Guncrafter GI in 45 ACP from Frontsight in the summer. While is only cost me two raffle tickets ($40) + $25 for a background check, I am really impressed by how nice this weapon is. Never heard of them before I owned one. I am an avid collector and shoot all the weapons I own. This is now my favorite 1911 over my Colt, Springfield, and Sig. I would pay $3000 to keep American craftsmen at work producing exceptional products and having a bucket of production line guns from overseas. If you like quality and the 1911, you might want to check them out.

  • Poor Dude November 24, 2014, 10:17 am

    Really? Shame on people for (a) having money and (b) wanting to spend it on guns? How’s your obamaphone?

    I can’t imagine spending $3k on that either, but I’m sure not going to knock anyone with the disposable income and desire, nor these guys for making a business out of producing such things. Then again, I always was above petty jealousy.

  • Doc Peay November 24, 2014, 10:13 am

    Wow, the bubbas sure get bent out of shape when you do a review on a gun out of their price range, huh? It’s a hand-fitted 1911, people! Wilson Combat are kits guns and cost more than this. 1911 aren’t like Glocks, Walthers, and Rugers. Yes, they are more expensive, but if you are a shooter, you probably know what the fuss is about. I myself can’t afford a Ferrari, but I don’t write angry comments when Car and Driver does a review on one. “Get a 96 Chevy and put some retreads on it, and spend the rest on gas!”

    • Eric November 24, 2014, 4:06 pm

      Your comment about Wilson Combat is absolutely incorrect. In fact, Alex Zimmerman came from Wilson Combat and use to be part of their R&D team. Wilson Combat builds their 1911s to very similar quality and tolerances as Guncrafter Industries. They are not kit guns. Wilson Combat makes every piece of their 1911s in-house from the best materials you can get your hands on. There is a reason their parts are called “bulletproof” and many, many people, even custom 1911 gunsmiths, use Wilson Combat parts in their guns. Their magazines are also top-of-the-line and Guncrafter even ships their guns with them (I know, 2 Wilson Combat magazines came with my GI CCO .45). Get your info straight before you spread misinformation to those less-informed please.

  • Eli November 24, 2014, 9:54 am

    I really hate when people slam on a product just because they wouldn’t buy it. Having shot several of Guncrafters pistols, I can tell that they compare to the best customs you can get from Wilson Combat, Nighthawk or Les Baer. Buy any of those custom guns and your going to spend anywhere from 2500 to 7000 dollars. I’m not talking about their regular production line stuff, but the custom orders that get the same level of fit and finish as Guncrafters puts into theirs. You also have to realize that because they aren’t selling 100,000 pistols every year, that they are going to charge more for the ones they do sell. I will buy a Frag once I get done paying off the wifes new truck and finish putting my daughter thru college. This is not a RICH mans gun. It is a hand made custom firearm. Yes it costs a lot more than a off the shelf Colt. But I have seem Kimbers sell for more than 2000 dollars and that is a production gun with very little hand fitting. It comes down to the individual, some people will find the price outrageous, will others will find it reasonable. I find it outrageous when people pay more than $60,000 for a pickup that should cost around 40K. It is what it is. To each his own. You can say you wouldn’t (or couldn’t) spend that much on a pistol without coming off like an ass and slamming a pistol you’ve never held or fired. I own more than 2 dozen pistols from various manufacturers, including one of Guncrafters 50gi conversion kits for the Glock 20/21. I can’t justify the expense of buying one today, but I will in the future, and that’s my choice.

  • Barry November 24, 2014, 9:43 am

    What’s wrong with wanting an expensive 1911. Guns are to be enjoyed and if you want to buy one for 3k, it’s your business. It’s capitalism, we don’t all have to drive the same car!

  • Josey88 November 24, 2014, 9:28 am

    I sold my 1911 to get my HK45C …. best decision I ever made and never looked back .
    Are you kidding ? $3000 for a 1911 9mm ?

  • Lt. Donn November 24, 2014, 9:07 am

    I read your article with a great deal of interest and humor….you are kidding right?…3 grand for a 1911 style 9mm?? are these folks nuts?…no, actually the only folks who are nuts are those that would purchase it!
    Get a good Gen-3 Glock, a Kydex holster, a Wilderness Instructors Belt, 6 magazines, a 1,000 rounds of practice ammo and put the rest of the 3 grand in your children’s College Fund

    • Cerillius November 24, 2014, 10:46 am

      ^^totally missed the point

  • Doug November 24, 2014, 8:47 am

    Hand made in the USA and pure quality. Nice review. Great company.

  • yakstone November 24, 2014, 8:34 am

    I think GI makes an outstanding model and though the price is high, you do get what you pay for.
    When is the last time you needed 19 rounds?
    Top quality fire arms that are hand fitted cost money and may not be for everyone. For those that can appreciate a well made piece, GI will not disappoint.

    • hANNAbONE November 24, 2014, 10:06 am

      “…when was the last time I needed 19 rounds…?”
      Ya know – I’m not sure – but I can tell you that IF I need them in my CZ SP-01, I KNOW they are there.
      That’s comforting beyond a +$3000 – non-real-world piece of iron.
      I’ll stay with my CZ P-01 9mm – my 75B 9mm – my SP-01 9mm…They all shoot lights out @ 25 yards and they combined cost less that 1/2 the cost of this featured handgun.
      I choose to spend wisely and pack a punch if need be – having one on my hip, one in my car and one under my pillow makes a ton more sense than having “1”.
      YMMV
      hANNAbONE

      • Robbins H Gray November 29, 2014, 3:05 pm

        What makes you think I have one. I probably have a dozen or so 1911 45 acp’s in this price range. And the ones I shoot the best shoot really well at 25 yards.

  • dave hickman November 24, 2014, 8:26 am

    Wealthy people that can’t drive buy 1000 HP Bugatti Veyrons. Wealthy people that can’t pick buy priceless handmade guitars. Wealthy people that can’t shoot well…….you get my drift.

    • Dave November 24, 2014, 9:36 am

      Good point. But race car drivers (the really successful ones) also buy expensive sports cars. They have an appreciation for quality and performance that most of us can’t comprehend.

    • Dave November 24, 2014, 9:37 am

      Good point. But race car drivers (the really successful ones) also buy expensive sports cars. They have an appreciation for quality and performance that most of us can’t comprehend.

    • singlemom November 30, 2014, 12:40 am

      I do not have money, but I do like accuracy and trust in what I protecting my family with…. if you have never shot one how can you judge?

  • Mike November 24, 2014, 7:57 am

    I agree with the Bill above and I also have a CZ SP01 Tactical that will shoot the lights out on that 1911, – carries 19 rounds 1/6th the price and three times the rounds. With the shape of the economy today I am really surprised that company is surviving. As far as the 50GI round talk about overkill and simply a novelty for those people that have that much disposable income they can lavish it on the likes of a handgun – shame on them, and shame on you for publishing this rubbish…!!!

    • Tom Driscoll November 24, 2014, 10:29 am

      Wow! Sounds like sour grapes to me. I’ve got $1500 or so tied up in a factory nickel plated Desert Eagle with custom grips (.44), and never blinked an eye. I’m not wealthy by any means, but I know what I like. I don’t go the casino or play golf so I have a few disposable bucks from time to time. Looks like a piece of art work to me and I don’t think 3K is outrageous for a weapon like that. However, I’m not too sure about 50GI but a .45 would sure be sweet.

    • Tahoejohn November 24, 2014, 12:28 pm

      I have the .50GI slide conversion for the Glock 20/21. Ammo is easy to reload and they sell Bullets, Shells and the die set.

      I love shooting it. I paid about $700 for the conversion sitting on a Glock21 lower.

      FYI

    • Robbins H Gray November 29, 2014, 3:01 pm

      Really. If I show you the church’s, schools, wells, and orphanages I build can I keep my gun.

  • Bill November 24, 2014, 4:15 am

    I’m sorry, but $3,000? Ridiculous. I wouldn’t swap then even up for my Cz-75, at 1/6 of the price. There are times that rich people’s toys are really absurd.

    • Don Myck November 24, 2014, 10:29 am

      I agree, give me a Colt or a Kimber any day.

    • Don Myck November 24, 2014, 10:30 am

      I agree, give me a Colt or a Kimber any day.

    • Dave Hicks November 30, 2014, 3:31 pm

      I like my CZ 75 also,I live in Arkansas,and I like American made firearms I can/t afford one of these

    • Vince November 17, 2015, 9:42 pm

      I’m not a gun snob and a regular working man, but these Guncrafters are totally worth it. I thought the same as you guys until I examined one. It’s handbuilt from the best materials and made to precise tolerances. I own Colts and if I took one and had it customized, it would cost MORE than the Guncrafter does new. Take a new gun and refit the slide/frame, manufacture/fit a match barrel, fit a quality beavertail, refit the bushing, remove and replace all the cheap MIM and cast parts with barstock, add an undercut and checker the straps, add the serrations to the slide top, trigger job, sights, 100 round test fire. I own them all- CZ-75,s Kimbers, Colts, Springfield Armories, HK’s, Performance Center S&W’s, BHP’s etc. This gun is in a completely different league.

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