Leathercreek Holsters–Handcrafted Old-School Gun Rigs

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When Ruger sent us a New Bearcat to review, we knew we needed gun leather. A revolver without a holster isn’t much fun. Even a diminutive rimfire revolver like the New Bearcat deserves to have its own rig. While it isn’t meant for fast-draw SASS matches, the Bearcat has its place. It would make a fine ranch gun, or backpacker’s gun, but there’s just something unsettling about sticking the naked barrel of a gun down your pants.

leather creek holsters

The holster is scaled to fit the Bearcat, and matches the proportions perfectly.

leather creek holsters

The whole holster is made from two pieces of leather with their split sides sewn together. This new single sheet is then cut and formed stitched up.

The fit and finish on the Bearcat holster is fantastic. The gun fit snugly, and was held in place by the leather cord. Though this sill loosen a bit with time, the holster should mold even more exactly to the revolver’s shape. It isn’t level one retention, but it isn’t likely to come free, either.

leather creek holsters

Up close detail on the stamping. Leather will hold incredibly fine detail.

leather creek holsters

Such primitive technology still works really well. This cord, and the friction of the gun in the holster, is remarkably secure.

These are handmade holsters, which means you’ll see some imperfections. Big companies that make thousands of holsters can afford perfect stamps that crank out flawless basket-weave. The hand stamp process is much more cumbersome and requires a maker to stamp each individual section of the weave. This isn’t complicated, but it can be monotonous. I’ve yet to see a flawless piece of hand-stamped leather, and these human touches are often the sign that it isn’t mass produced.

leather creek holsters

Hand-stamped basket-weave has a recognizable look that isn’t easily replicated by a machine.

The graceful lines of the holster mirror those of the Bearcat's grip.

The graceful lines of the holster mirror those of the Bearcat’s grip.

The Bearcat holsters start at $65 and go up to $130 (which is the full floral holster with a skirt). If you are looking for that personal touch, take a look at Leather Creek.

leather creek holsters

The leather inside the holster will darken up as it is exposed to light and oils from the gun.

leather creek holsters

The retention cord is laced through four holes, which adds enough friction to keep it in place.

leather creek holsters

With the loop around the hammer, the gun doesn’t move much at all.

leather creek holsters

The belt loop is open enough for a two inch belt.

leather creek holsters

The holsters are available in a variety of colors, but the red-hued brown is an ideal accent for the Bearcat’s grips.

leather creek holsters

The loop is angled a bit, which pops the grip of the gun out enough to grab.

leather creek holsters

This small stamp on the back is the only branding you’ll find on a Leather Creek Holster.

leather creek holsters

As the holster ages, this stark contrast between the inside and outside of the holster will diminish, but it will only look better.

leather creek holsters

The edges of the holster have been sanded and finished.

leather creek holsters

The stitching holds together the edges, which have also been glued.

leather creek holsters

The holster is open on the bottom which should allow any dirt or dust to slide right through.

leather creek holsters

The trigger isn’t fully protected, but the Bearcat has a transfer bar safety, so it can be carried with the hammer down on a loaded cylinder.

leather creek holsters

Overall, the holster is well made and handsome. It is a serious addition to a Ruger Bearcat, and one that allows the rimfire revolver to realize more of its practical potential.

leather creek holsters

The prices for a Bearcat holster start at just $65.

{ 4 comments… add one }
  • RALPH W. GUYTON November 15, 2015, 2:48 pm

    El Paso Saddlery will not do custom work, Kirkpatrick will. Send them a picture of what you want,address it to Jason.

  • OFBG August 12, 2014, 8:54 pm

    I cannot completely agree with your comment “These are handmade holsters, which means you’ll see some imperfections. Big companies that make thousands of holsters can afford perfect stamps that crank out flawless basket-weave. The hand stamp process is much more cumbersome and requires a maker to stamp each individual section of the weave. This isn’t complicated, but it can be monotonous. I’ve yet to see a flawless piece of hand-stamped leather, and these human touches are often the sign that it isn’t mass produced.” I have several items from El Paso Saddlery that, while handmade, are as close to “flawless” as I can see. I imagine that Leathercreek’s are equally fine. Just how closely do you look for imperfections?

  • Don August 12, 2014, 6:22 pm

    I have a Heritage Rough Rider in 22lr and 22 wmr . What would it cost for the basket weave holster ??

    Thank You

    Don

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