Marine Gunner Dispels Suppressor Myth

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Pop quiz hot shot: Does a suppressor affect the velocity of your projectile?

The answer is yes, but not in the manner you might think.  See, a suppressor actually increases the velocity of your projectile!

Yes, I know there are many Internet commandos that will tell you otherwise but the truth is that a suppressor marginally bolsters velocity.

The 2nd Marine Division Gunner in the video below will show you the difference in velocity between firing with and without a suppressor.

If my math is correct (no guarantees), based on his results, the suppressor he used on his M4 increased the velocity of the bullets by .59 percent, comparing group average to group average.

So, there you have it.  The myth that suppressors slow your bullets is busted.

H/T: U.S. Marine Corps video by Lance Cpl. Timothy Lutz and Cpl. Clarence Wimberly

{ 12 comments… add one }
  • BILLYBOB June 8, 2017, 7:55 pm

    BULLSHIT GUNNY BET YOU CAN\’T GET TO BULLETS OUT OF THE SAME BOX OF AMMO TO HAVE THE SAME SPEED ! TURN THE SUPPRESSOR ON THE BARREL A SEE IF THE BULLET SHOOTS THROUGH THE SAME HOLE !
    MFGS PORT THE BARRELS ON INTEGRATED SUPPRESSORS TO SLOW DOWN THE BULLET TO SUBSONIC ! SUPPRESSORS SLOW THE GAS EXITING THE BARREL ,REDUCING EXHAUST PRESSURE AGAINST THE BARREL !
    SONIC & SUBSONIC ELEVATION TEMP HUMIDITY ! WANTED AMMO THAT SHOOTS THE EXACT SAME SPEED EVERY TIME ! 50FPS = 1 MOA AT 100YD = 10 MOA AT 1000

  • Brent Fagerland May 27, 2017, 8:50 pm

    I have chronographed my 204 suppressed and unsuppressed and the suppressor decreased my fps. So I don’t
    believe that one test proves a point.

  • Michael Salzbrenner May 26, 2017, 2:10 pm

    First, Range, Accuracy, and Lethality are subjective and, at any rate, are not tied specifically to “velocity”. Making the blanket statement that a suppressor INCREASES your “Lethality” is arrogant, presumptuous, and irresponsible. The only thing that can be said for certain is that they lower your “audible footprint”. The videos assumptions are like installing a peep hole into a bay picture window. One set of tests, with one shooter, on one gun, with one type of ammunition, and one type of suppressor doesn’t equal “point proven”. There are a plethora of variables to be considered in such a hypothesis. Barrel Length, Suppressor Design, Action Type, Ammunition Type, Ammunition Load, Ambient Temperature, Humidity, etc. etc. etc. I could go on for hours. To me this is very much “jumping to conclusion” and I use “conclusion” in a very LIBERAL context.

  • OLDVIRGINIA May 26, 2017, 11:37 am

    Some integral suppressors — built in as part of the barrel — actually slow muzzle velocity.

    They have holes along part of the bore, which bleed-off pressures early.

    An integrally suppressed MP5 in 9mm is an example of this.

    • Steve May 26, 2017, 1:59 pm

      yes, but that’s the barrel (or more accurately the holes in the barrel) slowing down the bullet, not the suppressor.

  • Paul Holmes May 26, 2017, 11:21 am

    I agree with the change of velocity as the Marine suggests. I would throw in the fact that some people shoot subsonic ammo. I shoot 9mm 147 grain in my suppressed Glock 26. It is much quieter due to the heavier bullet itself, as the bullet is slower and the range is shorter. But shooting a supersonic bullet smaller grain then the 147 grain bullet (or your normal everyday ammo) that you would use in an unsuppressed gun, any change in velocity this article talks about would be a benefit. Also, I use a lighter weight recoil spring when using the can. I change back to the stock spring when I shoot without the can. I think there are a lot more variables that need to be taken into consideration. But, shooting a non modified gun with a can, I agree with this article. Just have to keep in mind that the gun may not recycle and jam without modding the gun too (spring, barrel, slide, etc..).

  • garyh May 26, 2017, 8:15 am

    This absolutely makes sense as it extends the length of the barrel. A longer barrel usually equals more velocity. I’d think that’s especially the case with the M4 which is velocity deficient due to it’s short length.

    • KEN May 26, 2017, 8:52 am

      Garyh is absolutely partially correct. The suppressor does not have any rifling to aid too its velocity, but it will keep a certain amount of gas pressure contained in a small place for a bit longer. That will help depending on the design of the suppressor. Smaller and longer as too fatter and shorter, but still depends on baffles.

  • Praedor May 26, 2017, 7:56 am

    Of course. They can improve the accuracy by changing the barrel harmonics. They DEFINITELY will change POI, if not accuracy, due to the velocity difference between suppressed and unsuppressed. Also work as nice muzzle brake, reducing felt recoil.

  • Dave May 26, 2017, 6:04 am

    I know for a FACT they do effect accuracy. M110 Rifles are fitted with their own suppressor serialized to each rifle.

    • garyh May 26, 2017, 8:12 am

      The article was about velocity, not accuracy, but since you offered it up, do you have a study or example to share? I’ve not noticed a difference.

      • Leighton Cavendish May 26, 2017, 9:13 am

        Every (good, complete) review of a can I have seen indicates how the can affects POI…and also whether it is consistent…
        it is not a matter of if…but of how much and in what direction(s)…

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