Medford Knife and Tool–SHOT Show 2015

Send to Kindle
The back side of the STA Sniper.

The back side of the STA Sniper.

Medford Knife and Tool makes some beefy knives. They’re unique in their agressive geometric shapes, and combination grinds. And these knives are thicker than almost every other knife I’ve ever seen. And the best part, in my humble opinion, is that these knives are built with the end user in mind. The steel selection is based on functionality, not fad, and scales can be removed with a Phillips head screwdriver.

Take this Sniper knife for example. It has several unique features that make it the ideal knife for the gun enthusiast. The hex wrench cut into the handle fits most scope ring bases. The blade on the back end is sized to fit in the turrets of scopes. On the back of the blade, inch long hashes help with basic estimations of size. In the blade itself is a tool for estimating range. The Look Through Range Estimator allows you to gauge distances (roughly) out to 400 yards.

Medford’s knives are not inexpensive. In an unusual twist for the knife industry, the folders (which often require more work than the fixed blades) are more expensive. The Sniper, for instance, is just $400.

Is that a lot for a knife? It depends on your point of view. All of these are made by hand. The materials are worked to perfection, and backed up. These aren’t fancy safe-queens, either. They’re working knives. And if you were to ever need the type of capabilities these knives offer, I doubt you’d complain about the price.

Functional materials and easy maintenance.

Functional materials and easy maintenance. The blade is D2 steel.

One inch hash marks.

One inch hash marks.

The LTRE on the Sniper.

The LTRE on the Sniper.

It has built in tools for adjusting scopes.

It has built in tools for adjusting scopes.

Part of the Medfor philosophy includes fixed and folding knives that are identical, so you can switch between the two without having to learn the habits of a new knife.

Part of the Medford philosophy includes fixed and folding knives that are identical, so you can switch between the two without having to learn the habits of a new knife.

SAme idea.

Same idea. Great idea.

{ 16 comments… add one }
  • steve June 8, 2015, 3:56 pm

    When paying X amount for a handmade , possibly one off , knife or weapon…one must consider the years of learning and tools and time involved…..if its to much…just walk away……! now on the other side some ‘silencers’ I see , that are popped out like beer cans…the price is WAY out of line.

  • Kamakazee Tumbleweed January 29, 2015, 12:51 am

    As a retired knife maker I can tell you with a fair amount of certainty that the material cost for this blade is under $10.00..(they get bulk discounts on this stuff ya know?)…Time involved in profiling, grinding, heat treating and finishing somewhere in the 8 hour range….$400 for a commercially produced knife as ugly and plain jane as this is pretty ridiculous…By the way, if you’ve never tried to sharpen a knife made out of D2, you are in for a special surprise….It’s true, quality costs, but this isn’t quality…Phillips head rivets…..really? That is a direct copy of any cheap Chinese or Pakistani you can usually find at your local carnival or flea market…

  • Ken January 28, 2015, 4:20 pm

    I wonder the price of the knife that ISIS uses to behead our people? I doubt they use more than a $2.00 Pakistan knife

  • Santa Walt January 28, 2015, 2:01 pm

    What kind of finish is on the Sniper shown?

  • Carney January 28, 2015, 12:23 pm

    I do not particularly “like” these knives but I’d never argue with the price! Affordability is relative to one’s pocketbook and personal values. Those two factors control our purchases in everything from weapons to cars to furniture and so on. I took up custom knife making just last year and have a good idea of what this kind of production takes. While there is value in a stamped out mass produced knife that holds an edge, it is NOT the same thing as a knife produced by true craftsmen any more than a Yugo is a Rolls Royce.

  • Carney January 28, 2015, 12:21 pm

    I do not particularly “like” these knives but I’d never argue with the price! Affordability is relative to one’s pocketbook and personal values. Those two factors control our purchases in everything from weapons to cars to furniture and so on. I took up custom knife making just last year and have a good idea of what this kind of production takes. While there is value in a stamped out mass produced knife that holds an edge, it is NOT the same thing as a knife produced by true craftsmen any more than a Yugo is a Rolls Royce.

  • Russ January 28, 2015, 11:55 am

    Nice Knives.
    Steve West’s file/buck style is real good too.
    People have different ways of marketing.
    Guys who make just a few knives and charge the premiums are justified.
    If they wanted to get rich, they would figure out a way to manufacture faster with quality materials.
    They don’t listen to the public or care, and are busy enough thinking small.
    Entrepreneurs, start up your own companies and give the people what they want.
    The doors open for you, you live in America.

  • Barry C January 28, 2015, 11:17 am

    Knives like firearms are personal choice items, and just like firearms customization and quality cost, anyone who has suffered thru a firearm jamming or having to use a seriously inferior product to get a job done realizes the benefits of quality, we all can’t shop at Harbor freight for our gear. I don’t think that is over the top for a custom knife, I certainly would consider it a minimum for a decent scope and look at the time it takes to make one of those. Quality costs, and is a personal preference, I love the feel of a great knife in my hand and ignore comments on its cost.

  • jay orton January 28, 2015, 10:18 am

    I love knives.i just recently killed my esse 5 and had no problems getting a new one.how’s the return policy. The knife is good looking .but I can buy a gun for that.if your going to hold any thing up to look for distance it might as well be a gun.goog luck with that one

  • Steve West January 28, 2015, 10:06 am

    I make my own knive’s out of a file and deer/elk antlers and 1/8 inck brass plate. I was offered 700 dollars for the one I carry when hunting,, I made him one “almost” like mine .

  • Rob62 January 28, 2015, 10:01 am

    Glad there are people who can afford $400 for one of these knives. I can’t. And neither can those folks who I know. Maybe I need to start hanging out in better crowds ?

  • warner Hileman January 28, 2015, 8:12 am

    What sniper would hold up in front of him(0r her) a large shiny object ,such as a knife blade to estimate range to a subject target. Why not put up a red flag instead. HUM

  • philly January 28, 2015, 7:42 am

    $400 for a knife? There is no justification for that price point ever….r&d….yeah right! Unless it’s made of platinum, you are getting ripped off…. but it’s “American made”….so I getting ripped off by an American is better? Puh leeeese.

    • B Ross January 28, 2015, 9:50 am

      $400 is actually not bad. I’ve seen hand made at knife shows going for double that. The raw material for this would be at least $50; the wire EDM for the cut outs might be $30 – $40. Rule of thumb for ‘craft’ business pricing is 10 X materials cost. Try making one from scratch and keep a real record of your time.

    • Joe January 28, 2015, 9:52 am

      It takes up to 15 hours of work to create a good blade. We are not talking pot metal knives from China here. The raw materials probably cost more than a cheap China blade complete and shipped. I know I wouldn’t want to make knives for 15 $ a day. So maybe ripped off is a little harsh.

    • mtman2 January 28, 2015, 10:06 am

      Of course each person has a limit as to priority in any investment.
      Some perfectly made and highly functional knives will service an individual with distinction, reasonably priced.
      But some hand made knives or San-Mai blades are works of art to be treasured, if that’s good for any such person.
      Only justifying that higher price range is a matter of taste and willingness to chance losing it as knives seem to do and
      losing a $300-$600. A collector is another matter ~!

Leave a Comment

Send this to a friend