Monday Gun Day Giveaway: Springfield Armory Mil-Spec 1911

Check out the specs: http://www.springfield-armory.com/products/1911-mil-spec-45-acp/

Buy one on GunsAmerica: /springfield armory mil-spec

Enter the contest: http://duel.springfield-armory.com/

The matte stainless helps hold back some of the glare.

The matte stainless helps hold back some of the glare.

Looking for a classic 1911 design that evokes the nostalgia of the old Mil-Spec single action? You’ve got a few options. Want one that is also stainless–a gun that can be upgraded the way 1911s have been for generations? You have fewer choices. The best, in my opinion, is the Springfield Armory Mil-Spec. And Springfield is giving one away on Monday, September 14. Want the details? Click here: http://duel.springfield-armory.com/.

The appeal of the Mil-Spec 1911 is easy to see. Fans of the retro blasters break into two distinct camps. The first are those who want a kick-ass pistol that evokes history. The old 1911A1 still inspires passionate feelings in many. And some of us don’t mind the old-school hammer and lack of a beaver tail. The Mil-Spec evokes the way it was. If that’s what you’re into, this is a great choice.

But this specific gun is stainless, which might make it a harder sell for some obsessive history buffs. Still, I mentioned two distinct camps. The second camp won’t care that the gun is stainless–in fact, it would be a strong selling point. These are the shooters who want an entry level gun that they can then come back to over a number of years, making slow modifications, until they build it into whatever they want. And the Mil-Spec is ideal for that. This gun is solid, out of the box. As each small piece is upgraded, the pistol will become even more functional for competition, or daily carry.

The fit and finish is solid. Everything locks up like it should.

The fit and finish is solid. Everything locks up like it should.

Cocobolo grips look good on the stainless, though there are black grips included, too.

Cocobolo grips look good on the stainless, though there are black grips included, too.

Springfield knows their 1911s, and the Mil-Spec has been their entry level gun for a couple of years–ever since the last of the old G.I. models. And they’ve got a reputation for quality. When you begin digging into the 1911s available, you’ll see some pretty broad diversity. Features may not be the first thing you notice, either. Typically it is the price-tag. But there isn’t likely to be any sticker shock associated with the Mil Spec.

After 2011, when everyone released their own single-actions, there were suddenly many more options for American made pistols. Springfield’s Mil-Spec continues to be the best match of American made quality and affordability.

Specs

Mil-Spec 1911 Specs

The Mil-Spec specs…

Shooting the Mil Spec

This is a no-frills 1911, so it won’t perform as well in your hands as some of the more expensive pistols that have been tricked out with extra checkering and serrations. That said, the stainless does have a  frosted, bead-blasted texture that provides a totally functional grip. And the gun shoots like a well made 1911. Ejection is clean. Feeding is reliable. Recoil is easy enough to manage.

And there are some upgrades. One feature that is atypical for a mil-spec is the 3-dot sight pairing. No hump and bump here. For me, this makes the argument that the Mil-Spec isn’t just mil-spec, but a solid choice for daily carry.

Clean ejection.

Clean ejection.

Typical muzzle rise for a 1911.

Typical muzzle rise for a 1911.

And this is the ideal platform for those who want to learn how to run, maintain, and modify a single-action. An example: the Mil-Spec’s trigger could be smoothed out slightly. That’s a great DIY project, if you have a reasonable aptitude with tools. Even as it comes, though, it isn’t a problem. I’d just keep it on the short list of upgrades that I’d make eventually.

With a Springfield 1911, you can guarantee adherence to specs. When you take the gun apart, it will go back together as it should. Aftermarket parts will fit with minimal modification needed. And the materials used in the construction of these pistols will stand up to hard use, regular maintenance, cleaning, and even some of the learning curve that comes from trail and error.

Check out the specs: http://www.springfield-armory.com/products/1911-mil-spec-45-acp/

Buy one on GunsAmerica: /Search.aspx?T=springfield%20armory%20mil-spec

Enter the contest:http://duel.springfield-armory.com/

The trigger breaks cleanly at 4 pounds.

The trigger breaks cleanly at 6 pounds.

The sights are better-than-mil-spec. This is a nod to the fact that this gun is less of an homage, and more of a starting point for daily carry.

The sights are better-than-mil-spec. This is a nod to the fact that this gun is less of an homage, and more of a starting point for daily carry.

The mag well has the edges knocked off, but it isn't as flared as what you'll find on many carry 1911s.

The mag well has the edges knocked off, but it isn’t as flared as what you’ll find on many carry 1911s.

The arched mainspring housing has straight serrations.

The arched mainspring housing has straight serrations.

I've always been a fan of Springfield's use of the crossed canons, and it looks good on a 1911.

I’ve always been a fan of Springfield’s use of the crossed canons, and it looks good on a 1911.

There's nothing exaggerated about the gun or the markings on it.

There’s nothing exaggerated about the gun or the markings on it.

Nothing exaggerated about the controls, either.

Nothing exaggerated about the controls, either.

The slide serrations have a slight angle--the same lines as the grip.

The slide serrations have a slight angle–the same lines as the grip.

The Mil-Spec is on par with the entry level 1911s, and maybe a cut above.

The 3-dot sights are a welcome addition to the old mil-spec pattern.

Even without the extra serrations and checkering, the pistol is easy to control. This is fast fire from 10 yards.

Even without the extra serrations and checkering, the pistol is easy to control. This is fast fire from 10 yards.

Check out the specs: http://www.springfield-armory.com/products/1911-mil-spec-45-acp/

Buy one on GunsAmerica: /Search.aspx?T=springfield%20armory%20mil-spec

Enter the contest: http://duel.springfield-armory.com/

{ 6 comments… add one }
  • Guy July 18, 2016, 8:24 pm

    I’m a 14 year Army vet I fired 119 a 1 in basics in 1980 I loved it

  • BRASS September 16, 2015, 12:16 am

    I have a stainless Springfield 1911 Mil-spec purchased 1995. I soon upgraded the sights to an adjustable rear and red insert front, trigger, guide rod and recoil spring to Wilson and pit a Houge rubber finger groove grips on it but otherwise, the internals and operational parts are unchanged in twenty years. I must have more than 20,000 rounds through it with no breakage or problems. The bore is turning dark but shoots a fist sized group offhand at twenty-five yards with old eyes.
    A year ago I decided to transition it from a carry gun to a dedicated house gun and had a gunsmith install a Brownells 1913 rail under the dust cover, a stellar job I might add by a nice guy who unfortunately passed from a heart attack not long ago. I will have a new barrel, link pin fitted and change the sights to XS 24/7 Big Dot Tritium sights front and rear as soon as I can find a new gunsmith I like.
    I have used this 1911 as a primary carry gun, a bowling pin gun, range gun, competition league centerfire 25 yard target gun, three gun match gun and even for jack rabbits successfully with H&G #68 style 185 gr. lswc cast bullets in the desert. Great eye hand coordination drills catching up to jacks coming out from behind a sage brush and racing to the next one. I quit counting rounds at 10K and that was years ago.
    I just don’t think you can go wrong with any gun that gives that kind of service. It has no cracks, still looks good and I’m confident will do a stellar job as a desk gun in my home office after a new barrel, tune up with new springs, pins, Streamlight laser/light under it and Federal HST 230 gr. LE JHP ammo in the Chip McCormick ten round and Wilson eight round mags.

  • Larry Laster September 14, 2015, 8:21 pm

    The Springfield 1911 is a pistol that I have always wanted to add to my collection.

  • Bill Duke September 14, 2015, 7:38 pm

    Would really like to own one for home defense.

  • daniel sullivan September 14, 2015, 11:24 am

    would love to own a firearm like this. but, having a difficult time trying to load the contest page. hope this works. thanks

  • Allen Benge September 14, 2015, 4:36 am

    I hate to sound pedantic. gut the artillery pieces crossed in the Springfield logo are cannons. Canon is something pertaining to churh or religious things. such as Pacelbel’s Canon in D. I had an XD-40 until recently, and will have one again. I once had an AMT Hardballer, and I am impressed with the 1911 from Springfield, as I am the M1A rifle. I wanted a system, but could not have both at the same time. For what I got for the XD40 at Cabela’s, I got a Hi-Point .40 S&W pistol and a .40 S&W carbine by Hi-Point. The magazines interchange and the warranty is the best in the land.

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