Mossy Oak’s New Dieback Thigh Rig for Hunters – SHOT Show 2017

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The Dieback Thigh Rig is designed to hold tightly to the body with minimal bulk or weight. (Photo: Howlett)

The Mossy Oak Dieback Thigh Rig is made for hunters but borrows ideas and functionality from military- and law enforcement-style tactical gear. (Photo: Howlett)

The main compartment is spacious and has mesh pockets to hold small items such as calls, lights, shells and tools. (Photo: Howlett)

For more information, visit http://www.mossyoak.com/.

Overview

Mossy Oak is releasing a minimalist day pack of a different sort for hunters this year, the new Dieback Thigh Rig. The Dieback Thigh Rig is for when your pockets aren’t big enough — and a fanny pack isn’t happening. Designed for flexibility, the Dieback can be strapped to your leg or carried over the shoulder.

It’s always a challenge for hunters looking to tote the essentials into the field while wanting to keep their load light at the same time. Let’s face it, a tactical-minded sportsman has to be fast and agile. When it comes time to scramble up a rocky slope or slip quietly through brush to get into position for a shot, you don’t want added bulk or weight to slow you down or increase the size of your profile.

Also, for many hunters, a hunt means a short hike down a trail from a parked vehicle and a few hours in a stand or blind. Most hunts arent a long trek into off-the-grid backcountry. A full-size pack is just too big.

For these hunters, Mossy Oak has a new kind of rig that combines design elements from both modern tactical and traditional hunting gear. The Mossy Oak Dieback Thigh Rig replaces the tired fanny pack. It’s an innovative bag that wears tight on the hip and is just large enough to carry the essentials.

The Dieback features a zippered rear pocket large enough for a full-sized handgun or mid-sized binoculars and a larger main pocket with three mesh dividers. These dividers help organize smaller gear items like a water bottle, animal caller, multi-tool, flashlight and other hiking and hunting essentials.

The kit sports webbing on the sides to provide hunters with the ability to expand their pack if needed while maintaining a slim profile. A wide waist belt attaches the bag securely around your waist while nicely distributing the Dieback’s weight. A stout leg strap holds the bottom of the bag against the thigh. This also makes it easy to access sitting or standing.

The bottom of the rig is held tight to the thigh with a smaller belt. (Photo: Howlett)

A third zippered compartment for smaller items. (Photo: Howlett)

Specifications

  • Break Up Country or Bottomland camo patterns
  • Size: 11 inches by 8 inches by 5.5 inches
  • Webbing: MOLLE

Mossy Oak offers the new Dieback Thigh Rig in either Break Up Country or Bottomland camo patterns. The bag measures 11 inches tall, by 8 inches wide and 5.5 inches deep.

Large zipper loops allow a hunter to easily open the main compartment even when wearing bulky gloves. (Photo: Howlett)

The Thigh Rig attaches around the waist with a wide nylon belt that easily adjust to accommodate any size hunter or the amount of clothes they are wearing. (Photo: Howlett)

The rear compartment is large enough to hold a full-size handgun. (Photo: Howlett)

There is also an open mesh sleeve on the outside to rapidly access items such as a call. (Photo: Howlett)

Impressions

This is a great substitute for turkey hunters weary of rocking that bulky turkey vest with too many pockets. In recent years, I’ve almost quit wearing a turkey vest except on truly big country hunts, they are too bulky.

When hunting, I want to travel light, to be able to drop low and move out of sight fast. Many of today’s vests’ seating systems simply make them too wide where they catch on brush. And there is such a thing as too many pockets, making it hard to find the right one in short time.

Availability

Mossy Oak expects to have both versions, Break Up Country and Bottomland camo, available for summer 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.mossyoak.com/.

{ 1 comment… add one }
  • Wriggs January 26, 2017, 9:36 am

    I like the idea however I believe the belting portion that goes around the waste should be built like a belt to avoid cutting into the waist line area. Believe me I carried thigh rigs on 3 deployments and the better the belt the longer you will where it without discomfort.

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