Custom Cerakote from Scalpel Arms

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The H&K and Silencerco in Kryptek Typhon.

The H&K and Silencerco in Kryptek Typhon.

http://www.scalpelarms.com/

https://www.facebook.com/scalpelarms

We all have a favorite gun–the rifle you wanted for years, or a pistol you picked up on impulse and still cant get enough of. Once you get it, what else is there? Sure, you should stock up on ammunition and accessories. Then what? Buy a new gun? Maybe. Or look at your other options. Finish that one gun off the right way. Truly make it yours and send it to someone like Scalpel Arms for the 5 Star treatment.

Traditionally it’s been hit or miss with sending your beloved guns to strangers for any type of work. It is a gamble, and one that most just aren’t willing to take. But in this day and age of Facebook and Instagram we now get a chance to really judge and get to know the surgeon who’s will be working on our special little friends.

One such company that is truly making waves in the firearms customization world is Scalpel Arms. Veteran owned and operated, Scalpel Arms is doing more than just changing the way firearms look; they’re also changing the way they are perceived. These aren’t just guns–they’re art.

Scalpel Arms has been called the Cerakote Kings, the Warhol of Weaponry, and the Michelangelo of M-4s. I happen to agree with these statements, but here is a link to some of his work. You be the judge. http://www.scalpelarms.com/Custom_Work.php

For me, it all started when I stumbled upon a picture of a 12” SBS Remington 870 in Battle Flag. I wanted my H&K USP 45 Tactical and Silencerco Osprey coated in a Kryptek Typhon in Cerakote..

Even though it looks like paint, it isn't.

Even though it looks like paint, it isn’t.

Scalpel Arms has made the process of sending your gun in easy. There are 3 steps to follow to make sure your weapon is adequately shipped and pampered. Beyond guidance through there website they are also just a phone call away if you have any unanswered questions or concerns.

  1. Download and complete the order form
  2. If mailing a firearm contact them for a copy of their FFL
  3. Place form/s in package with your project and ship it from a UPS or FedEx center (not the US Mail, and not one of the retail strip-mall shops).

Once your per-disasembled gun arrives the parts are cleaned up and the Cerakote is layered on. If you are unable to dissemble the gun completely they can recommend a gunsmith who can. they can also handle this part of the process for you all together for an added cost. Scalpel Arms advertises a 3-4 week turn around time from when they get the gun. In this industry this is a quick turnaround time. Most custom shops will need a minimum of 6 weeks, and I’ve even heard horror stories of many moons passing before other shops even start work.

As you’d expect, the more custom work you have done, the higher the price will be. But it is easy to see where the money is going. If you look at the Kryptek and see how all of the overlays have to be masked in order to be properly sprayed, you’ll understand.

For my project the bill was a $300 plus shipping. It broke down to $250 for the pistol and another $50 for the suppressor. Think of it as an investment. Not only are you preserving your purchase, in many cases you are actually adding value to the firearm if you ever do decide to sell.

The Kryptek pattern covering the base showed clean, clear lines. The colors are bold but not bright. The pattern flows from the pistol on to the suppressor and makes the two a matching set. The pattern encompasses all surfaces and takes the badass combo and makes them something that I’m beyond proud to own.

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Beyond the clean base layer and crisp pattern there is an over-spray covering the gun that brings the pattern together and almost makes it look organic. The over-spray is subtle but completes the pattern. It breaks up the sharp lines of the gun and suppressor and takes the edge off of any sharp transitions in color.

Beyond aesthetics, the Cerakote offers great protection of your firearm’s metals, plastics, and woods. The ceramic coating bonds to surfaces. It makes cleaning easier and is harder to ding or scratch. There are around 80 colors available and endless patterns/ camouflages to choose from. If crazy patterns aren’t exactly your style, they also offer single colors, and more traditional restoration style refinishing.

Scalpel Arms has a winning formula for weapons customization. They are a Class 3 FFL/SOT and able to work on everything from Glocks to registered machine-guns. If you are considering coating or customizing one of your weapons, give them a look.

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{ 5 comments… add one }
  • Mason Hamilton April 20, 2015, 2:49 pm

    Your article would be far more professional and informative if you had sought out the eng. specs. and standardized testing for this product. As it is there is next to no intelligent and critical information in article to create accurate expectations of how the product (coating) might perform. That said going to the company’s web site I found no such technical information available which would definitely be a red flag for me. You could have just said “Cool” and said as much.

    • DaveGinOly April 20, 2015, 4:33 pm

      Dude, this article is about a single company and the work they do coating guns. It’s not about the coating itself. Such discussions have been had, and can be found on the interwebs, but are obviously beyond the scope of this article. Should every article about a gun coating company and the work they do have all the technical specs of the coating they use, and a comparison of those specs with the specs of every other coating (a discussion about the specifications of Cerakote would be useless without comparing them to the specifications of other coatings)? Obviously that would be absurd.

  • Mason Hamilton April 20, 2015, 2:40 pm

    You describe this a ceramic coating. No offense, but it isn’t possible to put a ceramic coating on plastic under the heat 1200+ degrees required for ceramic coating – most plastics melting at half of that. Consequently, this may be a ceramic material matrix within some plastic/polymer paint/coating matrix where heat isn’t required. Would like to see the abrasion test characteristics.

  • Chief April 20, 2015, 10:54 am

    Oh so many possibilites with the new coatings ,were going to see some nice arms coming our way.

  • Slim April 14, 2015, 7:41 pm

    Your pistol looks awesome. Let me know if you raffle it away LOL.

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