Tennessee Arms Co. Taking Pre-Orders for Hybrid Glock Mag AR Lowers

The Tennessee Arms Company, hybrid receiver specialists, is taking pre-orders for their highly-anticipated pistol-caliber AR lowers. Their new AR-15 lowers are lightweight, affordable and compatible with Glock-pattern magazines.

Called the TAC-9s, these are “small frame” receivers built for 9mm Luger, .357 SIG and .40 S&W components. They have snug but drop-free magwells with ambidextrous magazine release buttons for left- and right-handed use.

The Tennessee Arms Company has been developing the TAC-9 for more than two years. The company has been wildly successful in the lightweight receiver business, proving that the technology and materials are there as alloy alternatives.

A TAC-9 receiver shown here fully stripped. Lowers include the magazine release assembly which is fully ambidextrous. (Photo: Tenn. Arms Co.)

The company is taking pre-orders for stripped receivers (magazine release components are included) for $89, with custom engraving optional for an additional $10. They are also taking orders on complete lowers with MIL-SPEC M4 Carbine parts for $189.

Delivery is expected in the next six to eight weeks. Existing customers will enjoy an additional ten percent off with the discount code “PRIORCUSTOMER” (without quotes).

Like their other lowers, these new receivers are hybrid glass-filled nylon lowers with brass inserts for improved strength and reliability. Additionally, these receivers are heavily reinforced and overbuilt for use with direct blowback uppers.

The buffer extension and pistol grip are molded around threaded brass reinforcements. Not only do these add strength at key locations, they also allow users to install and remove pistol grips and buffer tubes without having to worry about stripping the threads out of the receiver.

See Also: Multi-Mag 9mm AR: Nordic Components Glock- and M&P-Compatible Carbine

Because the bulk of the receivers are polymer, they offer some improved function over conventional cast or milled lowers. The polymer is flexible and can bounce back from hits that would permanently damage an alloy part. And the finish is embedded throughout the material, making these lowers somewhat scratch-proof.

Direct blowback uppers can be hard on lower receivers since they put a lot of stress on the buffer extension. The flexibility of these lowers works to their advantage. With full-auto testing complete, Tennessee Arms is ready to kick off mass production and take orders now.

Shown here fully assembled, ready for an upper receiver. (Photo: Tenn. Arms Co.)

The reduced weight helps offset the added bulk of pistol-caliber AR uppers, which should give these better balance than conventional assemblies.

Tennessee Arms’ lowers are available in a wide range of colors. The receivers are color-matched to Magpul parts. Because they’re a cast hybrid design, they can sell them for considerably less than the bulk of Glock-mag-compatible AR lowers, too.

Everything else is oversized and overbuilt. The magazine well is flared and the receiver sports an integral trigger guard. Despite the added structure the receiver only weighs 7 ounces, stripped.

For anyone still concerned about hybrid receivers today, these lowers come with a lifetime guarantee. If you have any problems with them, the Tennessee Arms Company will be there to help.

{ 7 comments… add one }
  • W Roberts June 17, 2017, 2:20 am

    A 10 MM mid-length or dissipator complete AR would be perfect!

    • loupgarous June 18, 2017, 9:33 am

      Agreed. Back in the late 1970s, when it was still called 10mm Norma, people like Col. Jeff Cooper were saying what a great cartridge the long 10mm pistol round would be in an SMG or carbine. In fact, Heckler & Koch had one of their MP-series made for that cartridge in select-fire and long barreled semi-auto versions (the civilian model was withdrawn owing to reliability issues). The Stoner-designed AR action ought to be more reliable in 10 mm.

  • akjc77 June 16, 2017, 9:28 am

    Yeah I am fully agreeing with last comment, a 10mm version would be your best do all cartridge for a light rifle/pistol gun. The 10mm is a capable cartridge, Uncle Ted Nugent made me a believer, seen him take a buck with 10mm pistol w/ a scope. That round is hard on the wrists in pistol form however and this would be area where it could really shine. I\’d rather have it in 10mm than .45 which I didn\’t see offering for either. I\’m curious too you made it sound like the brass inserts are changeable? So how are they held in?

  • akjc77 June 16, 2017, 9:26 am

    Yeah I am fully agreeing with last comment, a 10mm version would be your best do all cartridge for a light rifle/pistol gun. The 10mm is a capable cartridge, Uncle Ted Nugent made me a believer, seen him take a buck with 10mm pistol w/ a scope. That round is hard on the wrists in pistol form however and this would be area where it could really shine. I’d rather have it in 10mm than .45 which I didn’t see offering for either. I’m curious too you made it sound like the brass inserts are changeable? So how are they held in?

    • Dr Motown June 16, 2017, 9:55 am

      Check out the Kriss Vector…it comes in a 10mm version

  • Gooedowner June 16, 2017, 8:13 am

    It looks theres no last round lock back?
    Is that true?
    If there is one and i missed it i’ll order one tomorrow.

  • Joe June 16, 2017, 6:05 am

    I don’t think using a nine mm piece for hog eradication should be recommended in a gun demo. but hey!! how about a 10 mm version ?

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