TrackingPoint Review – 70% First Hit Sniper Accuracy at 1,000 Yards!

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Editor’s Note: The first time I fired the TrackingPoint, I was in Nevada, where there is no limit to the available distance. I was with a group of writers at Range Day in 2013, and it was bitterly cold. I’d never touched the rifle. I’d never attempted a shot past 300 yards, with anything. I watched a couple of shooters (following the step-by-step procedure on an iPad), and when it was my turn I took my seat at the bench and saddled up.

I was looking for a steel target on a ridge line more than 900 yards away. It was a 24″ steel plate–I could see that much, but I didn’t know how much elevation dropped, or the exact distance. And I could only estimate the wind which was blowing in my face, but swirling through the canyon between me and the target. It was in the low teens and I wasn’t about to remove my gloves. I sat down, tagged the target, pulled the trigger…then the gun bucked. In less time than it has taken you to read this paragraph, I had my first hit at 900 yards. There was a slight pause, and I heard the gong of that fat .338 bullet hitting steel.

On with the review…

This is definitely not your father’s rifle…but it could be yours.

This is definitely not your father’s rifle…but it could be yours.

Advances in technology continue to make possible incremental improvements in the quality and accuracy of rifles. At the same time, the capabilities of scopes keep improving. Clearer, brighter sight pictures with reticles custom designed for your ammunition make long range shooting much more accessible. But these advancements happen slowly. What Tracking Point has achieved is a quantum leap in long range shooting, so easy to use that a child can make shots out to 500 yards and beyond. WithTrackingPoint’s Precision Guided Firearms,you can take what you learn in an hour or two at the range and hunt at distances well past 1,000 yards.

Scott Calvin, Territory Manager for TrackingPoint, came to Dallas this summer with a couple of their rifles and plenty of ammunition. During his presentation leading up to the trip to the range, Scott said, “Our objective in building this system was to disrupt the market with a 1,000 yard gun that creates a solution, allowing the average shooter to go out and make 1,000 yard shots.” From what I saw, that’s exactly what they’ve done.

Scott opened with a short course on long distance shooting describing the various elements that go into formulating a long distance aiming solution. The biggest variable is bullet drop due to gravity. Next are spin drift, Coriolis effect, Magnus effect, rifle cant, altitude, barometric pressure, humidity, etc. All told, there are about twenty variables to consider. At distances under 325 yards the effect of these forces is minimal for the calibers we’d be shooting. However, the farther out you go, the more dramatically they affect the path of the bullet. At 1,000 yards, according to US Army research, first-shot-hit probability is less than 5%. TrackingPoint’s shooting system has improved that to 70% or better.

The XS1 .338 Lapua Magnum is the biggest and most powerful TrackingPoint Precision Guided Rifle (PGR). The wire on the left side of the scope ties the ballistics computer to the guided trigger.

The XS1 .338 Lapua Magnum is the biggest and most powerful TrackingPoint Precision Guided Rifle (PGR). The wire on the left side of the scope ties the ballistics computer to the guided trigger.

The first thing you need to understand is that these guns aren’t simply rifles with scopes attached. The gun, scope, ammunition, and guided trigger are all integral parts of the rifle system which TrackingPoint refers to as a Precision Guided Firearm. Here’s how it works.

With your game animal in the scope crosshairs, you press a red button in the front of the trigger guard which “tags” your aiming point with a red dot. This red dot automatically follows any movement of the animal up to 10 mph. In other words, you have locked in the aiming point. A computer in the scope instantaneously calculates the shot solution. Then you pull the trigger all the way to the rear.

This is where it gets a little weird. The gun does not fire when you pull the trigger.

Your brain is telling you this isn’t right, but it is. It’s just different. Instead, you get an illuminated crosshair that moves as you move the gun to your tag. The rifle will not fire until the illuminated crosshair crosses the tag, at which time the shot breaks. This guarantees that you are aiming precisely where the computer has calculated you should for a first round hit. It’s a little strange at first but quickly becomes second nature.

Scott has gone on several hunts to prove the TrackingPoint long range technology in the field. On one of these hunts there was a beautiful trophy-size Axis buck in front of him. He put the scope on the animal and was easily able to keep a tag on it as it moved around. After several long seconds, his guide started whispering “Shoot, shoot,” as if Scott didn’t know what to do. Instead he lowered his rifle and said, “I can’t. It’s only 92 yards….”

It wasn’t that 92 yards wasn’t within the rifle’s wheelhouse, but it wasn’t going to prove anything either. The TrackingPoint needs to stretch out.

PRECISION GUIDED FIREARM

The scope is the primary component of the shooting system. It fuses the data from all of the sensors into a firing solution through the built-in ballistics computer.

The scope is the primary component of the shooting system. It fuses the data from all of the sensors into a firing solution through the built-in ballistics computer.

So what exactly is a Precision Guided Firearm and how does it work? The system is based on a very precise rifle. To the rifle are added a sophisticated scope and a trigger that’s guided by the computer in the scope. The scope, the most important part of the system, is a 30-35 power digital optic meaning that you don’t look through the scope as in a typical glass optic. What you see is a digital image which can also be viewed simultaneously on the iPad which comes with the rifle. There are also apps to let you see on your cell phone what the scope sees. The image processor refreshes 54 times per second and is stabilized by 3 gyros and 3 accelerometers. (Ever try to hand hold a 35 power optic?) The stability and image quality are fantastic. The scope sends out a short-range WIFI signal to pair with the iPad, cell phone, or whatever other device you may be using. It also records audio and video. Oh, and there’s a laser hard mounted on the barrel of the rifle which shines into the scope to re-zero it every time you turn it on.

The scope is calibrated for the ammunition. TrackingPoint partnered with Barnes to develop ammunition with a guaranteed variation in muzzle velocity shot-to-shot of no more than 10 fps. Consistency in cartridge performance, of course, is one of the keys to accurate shooting. When you buy a rifle, you get 200 rounds of ammunition as part of the package. To buy additional ammunition, the cost is about $8 per round. I have a feeling we’re going to see a lot of TrackingPoint owners using hand loaded ammo.

The combination of the weight of the TP XS1 .338 Lapua Magnum PGR and the effectiveness of the Blackout 90T muzzle brake greatly reduces felt recoil.

The combination of the weight of the TP XS1 .338 Lapua Magnum PGR and the effectiveness of the Blackout 90T muzzle brake greatly reduces felt recoil.

The scope sensor array includes a laser range finder, barometer, thermometer, tilt sensor, etc. In fact, it feeds the ballistic computer everything to make the perfect shot, with the exception of wind data. You still have to input your own wind information. Scott said they could incorporate a sensor to determine wind but it would add too much bulk to the scope and dramatically reduce battery life. That’s likely the biggest reason first round hit probability is less than 100%. Calculating the average crosswind between you and your game is challenging. In fact, the wind at the target may be blowing 180 degrees from where it is at your position. It takes experience to accurately make wind estimates and even the best shooters don’t always get it right. But then again, the type of hunters who are buying these rifles probably welcome the challenge.

The actual firing of the rifle is guided by the scope. Pulling the trigger to the rear arms the gun. When the illuminated reticle crosses the tag, a solenoid releases the firing pin. The lock time, the time between when the solenoid fires and the shot breaks, is very short.

AT THE RANGE

The main power button is on the back of the scope just to the right of the ocular.

The main power button is on the back of the scope just to the right of the ocular.

Scott brought two guns with him, a TrackingPoint XS1 .338 Lapua Magnum and a TP 750 300H .300 Winchester Magnum. The XS1 had a 27” Krieger cut barrel fitted to an Accuracy International AX chassis. A Blackout 90T muzzle brake capped the end of the barrel and we shot off a Harris bipod. The scope zooms from 6 to 35 power for this 1,200 yard rifle which fires the Barnes 300 grain Sierra Open-Tipped XactShot ammunition.

There were two steel targets set up 300 yards downrange. Unfortunately, that was the longest range available in the Dallas area. To truly test a long range gun, you need to shoot beyond 4-500 yards. A 1,000 yard range would be ideal. Still, this was simply a familiarization outing and the range was sufficient for that. If we get a chance to shoot the system at longer ranges, we’ll be sure to let you know.

The gun was set up on a bench. Getting behind the scope with a sniper wrap on the gun, you acquire the target on low magnification, then use the button on top of the scope to zoom in. The stability of the image was remarkable and made it an easy task to put the reticle on the center of the target. When it’s where you want it, you reach up to the tagging button in front of the trigger and depress the button to tag your aiming point. You’ll see a red dot where you’ve tagged. If you don’t get a good tag or don’t like where it is, you delete the tag and do it again. Once you’re satisfied with your tag, depress the trigger fully to the rear. An illuminated reticle will appear telling you that the gun is armed and ready to fire. The trigger reticle will be below and to the right of the scope reticle making it obvious what the drop and bullet spin drift compensation is. Of course, you don’t really have to concern yourself with that. Just bring the illuminated trigger reticle up to the red tag dot. As it passes over your tag, the gun fires. It’s always a surprise, which is what you want. No flinching here.

You would expect significant recoil from a 300 grain Lapua Magnum round, but it was, in fact, quite mild. The XS1 with the loaded magazine weighs about 25 pounds. The weight combined with the excellent muzzle brake reduced recoil significantly. In fact a young man about 14 or 15 years old was able to fire the gun with no problem. Oh, and he hit the 300 yard target center mass too.

TP 750 300H

You can see the primary controls on the top of the scope. They’re big and easy to use, even wearing gloves.

You can see the primary controls on the top of the scope. They’re big and easy to use, even wearing gloves.

While you probably wouldn’t want to be traipsing around in the mountains with the XS1 on your back, the TP 750 is about half the weight – 12 pounds loaded. It employs a Remington LTR fluted stainless steel 26” barrel with black TriNyte PVD coating married to a Bell and Carlson composite stock. Overall length is 45 ¾”. The TP 750 is rated as a 750 yard rifle firing Barnes 220 grain and 190 grain ammo with a 6 to 30 power scope.

Although the zoom power is a little less on the 750 series, it operates identically to the XS1. Acquire the target, tag it with the tag button, pull the trigger to the rear, line up the trigger reticle with your tag until the rifle fires. Recoil is more pronounced with the lighter gun and lack of muzzle brake but it wasn’t intolerably so. In fact it was quite a bit less than 300 Win Mag in a lighter mountain gun. We weren’t shooting paper so I can’t say it was a tack driver although I know it was. You don’t get the kind of shot repeatability I was seeing, even at only 300 yards, unless you’re shooting a very accurate gun. And at the price point we’re talking about, it better be a tack driver.

PRICE

The 12 pound TP 750 300H in .300 Win. Mag.  You can see the red button on the front of the trigger guard used to “tag” targets.

The 12 pound TP 750 300H in .300 Win. Mag. You can see the red button on the front of the trigger guard used to “tag” targets.

The TP XS1 .338 Lapua Magnum has an MSRP of $27,500. The TP 750 series is $12,995. One of the attendees told me that he was there to buy one for his shooting range. He and a group of his buddies created a range and intended to share the rifle. Split ten ways you’re down in the neighborhood of rifles with considerably less ability. Still TrackingPoint has sold more than 500 rifles. I would imagine that most of the buyers were individuals.

TrackingPoint is introducing a series of TP ARs. The first of these will be offered to their existing customers, then to the general public. The ARs include a .556 chambering, a 7.62, and a 300 Blackout. The 7.62 is a 750 yard rifle while the other two are 500 yard rifles.

TP AR 556 – $9,995

TP AR 762 – $14,995

TP AR 300 BLK – $10,995

CONCLUSION

The TP 300H scope zooms from 6 to 30X.

The TP 300H scope zooms from 6 to 30X.

For some of us, the TrackingPoint system is so advanced that it defies comprehension, much less explanation. TrackingPoint allows a complete novice to make hit on a target at 1,200 yards with just a basic introduction to the rifle. Is this good or bad? The debate is just getting started. The electronic heart of the TP system could be comprimised. Some worry that the rifles could be shut down remotely. And recent applications of TrackingPoint technology have demonstrated other abilities that have some cheering and others sweating bullets. For example, Google Glass can be used to aim the TrackingPoint around barriers, and the rifles have the potential to be linked, so one spotter can set tags for multiple shooters…. Are these possibilities of the platform, or abuses? It depends on your view, and goes well beyond the purview of this article.

Generally speaking there are 4 primary challenges in long distance shooting:

  1. range estimation,
  2. environmental ballistic factors,
  3. human error, and
  4. consistency of equipment.
The eye cup helps improve image visibility while protecting the shooter from getting smacked by the scope. There’s plenty of eye relief. You just have to be aware of how close you are.

The eye cup helps improve image visibility while protecting the shooter from getting smacked by the scope. There’s plenty of eye relief. You just have to be aware of how close you are.

Tracking Point has demonstrated a solution for all four with the exception of one environmental factor – wind. Shooting these guns at distance still requires this fundamental long range shooting skill. That said, the TrackingPoint is more forgiving for hunters than it is for target shooters. With all of the other variables accounted for, the bullet is still likely to produce a solid hit on its intended target, even with slight miscalculations in wind speed.

Their objective was not to replace other rifles, but to add a new dimension to hunting. That they have. Their guns are expensive as most new technology is. However, if it follows the trajectory of other new technology, we’ll see the size, weight, and price come down over time. With $37 million invested in the development of their Precision Guided Rifles and more than 70 patents, Tracking Point has to recover their initial costs. How long that will take is anybody’s guess. In the meantime, they’re the only game in town and they have a fully developed product which offers you a significant edge in your trophy hunts. If you’re planning on spending a tidy sum for a hunt, you might want to give them a call and get behind one of these rifles yourself. You’ll be glad you did.

RESOURCES

TrackingPoint: www.tracking-point.com

Barnes Ammunition: http://www.barnesbullets.com/products/ammunition/

Accuracy International: www.accuracyinternational.com/

Blackout International: http://www.advanced-armament.com/TiTan-QD-Muzzle-Brake_p_496.html

Bell and Carlson: www.bellandcarlson.com/

 

The ammunition, specially manufactured for TrackingPoint by Barnes, is an integral component of the shooting system.

The ammunition, specially manufactured for TrackingPoint by Barnes, is an integral component of the shooting system.

 

Scott Calvin uses the included iPad to coach a shooter. He can see everything the shooter can see through the scope. In fact, you don’t even have to look through the scope to shoot your target. You can simply use the iPad or your cell phone for your sight picture, allowing you to shoot around corners without exposing yourself to enemy fire. But, ah, that’s another topic.

Scott Calvin uses the included iPad to coach a shooter. He can see everything the shooter can see through the scope. In fact, you don’t even have to look through the scope to shoot your target. You can simply use the iPad or your cell phone for your sight picture, allowing you to shoot around corners without exposing yourself to enemy fire. But, ah, that’s another topic.

 

The TP 750 300H has more felt recoil than the heavier XS1, but it’s still a blast to shoot.

The TP 750 300H has more felt recoil than the heavier XS1, but it’s still a blast to shoot.

 

This whisp of a young man had no trouble handling the recoil of the .338 Lapua Magnum. In fact, he scored a bullseye.

This whisp of a young man had no trouble handling the recoil of the .338 Lapua Magnum. In fact, he scored a bullseye.

Scott Calvin presented the key features of each of the TrackingPoint models.

Scott Calvin presented the key features of each of the TrackingPoint models.

Scott Calvin, Territory Manager for TrackingPoint, discussed the many factors that go into a long distance firing solution.

Scott Calvin, Territory Manager for TrackingPoint, discussed the many factors that go into a long distance firing solution.

 

{ 45 comments… add one }
  • John Barker November 2, 2017, 2:32 am

    Smart thought and incredible innovation I will be intrigued when it is miniaturized scale estimated in light of the fact that labeling an objective when your under anxiety and fire and afterward having the capacity to get an answer snappier would be pleasant. You can even check Amazing gun safes to store your guns.

  • Ryan October 30, 2017, 6:31 am

    We all know that Riflescope is one of the most important appliances of hunting and I am in agreement with this. I have pleased to read the reviews with tracking point. Now, I am keenly waiting for your next post. Thanks and keep it up!

  • Karik January 20, 2017, 2:06 am

    Very detail and impressive reviews with tracking point. 1,000 Yards is a good range to test this monster, thank you mate for offering us this so useful post!

  • ryan percy October 12, 2016, 4:12 am

    No doubt, Riflescope is one of the most important appliances of hunting. And now this TrackingPoint looks really badass, will surely cover review of this on my guns blog some other time.

  • John Anderson August 9, 2016, 5:58 am

    No doubt, Riflescope is one of the most important appliances of hunting. To succeed one should use it. In middle range the TP 750 series are good. Thanks .

  • Todd Farrow July 9, 2016, 4:02 pm

    Ok this is worse than farming these huge rack buck pay your money ,there you have a fake whatever onn your wall (proud moment).Just get someone else to shot it for you .Guess what all this technology is same thing.If you have 1000yds hey its for you but YOU didn’t do it technology did.Where has hunting gone ,great article ,great info and really thanks for putting in on here reall appreciate all the info ,jam packed ,did not go unnoticed. Guess I can’t let that old way which someone older than me thinks same way about just a scope lol.

  • Rick October 28, 2015, 4:40 pm

    Couldn’t agree more with the above,your scope is a vital piece to the puzzle. You can check out some rifle scope reviews

  • George July 17, 2015, 2:33 am

    Riflescope is more important gadget for hunting.
    Please visit-[ http://riflescopecenter.net/ ] to choose a Riflescope for you.

  • Cadfile October 25, 2014, 8:43 pm

    Did you guys forget the 1000 Yd range at Ft Walters in Mineral Wells Texas? I think the national guard has taken it ovet now but if you made an inquirie to the right people out there I think you could get in yo try out that piece of equipment. But watch the wind as it is real squrely out there.

  • joe buffolino October 20, 2014, 7:15 pm

    i think that scope is a little high in price when and if it comes down in price. i will consider buying one but righi to much money

  • Jake October 20, 2014, 2:54 pm

    I can tell you first hand they are impressive to shoot. A project I was part of has two of them. I was the Team Lead for the Tactical team. We bought two of these things. I can tell you that firing them is a strange experience the first few times. It takes some getting used too. Having to first tag the target, then pull the trigger then move the second pip in the sight onto the tag pip is strange because usually when you shoot, you control your breathing and put yourself in a mental state for the shot.. With the Tracking point it throws all of that taught and trained stuff out the window.

    One issue I did find I personally did not like is that at range, there is no way to easily move the second pip onto the tag pip smoothly because of the distance and zoom level needed to even view the target.. I.E. small movement makes HUGE reticle move… and because you have to ‘force’ that second pip onto the first pip WHILE holding down the trigger… well it can be a bit frustrating at long distances. Unlike standard long range shooting where you use your breathing, rhythm etc, to make your shot, the tracking point system does mess with this whole routine.

    The other issue is this is NOT a system for FAST shooting of targets. Getting a sight picture takes time because you have to find the target, tag the target, pull the trigger then find the target again all while trying to make very minimal movement. If you have a stationary target or even a slow moving target under say walking speed or less, this system is good. But if you are in a situation where you have multiple targets that need you to put rounds on immediately, forget it. This is NOT the system to use.

    For my team, the plan for these two we bought was to position them in the sniper post and use them solely for long range sniping defense only. Carrying them around as a field/unit sniper rifle is NOT feasible with the current design. In a fast changing situation, there is just not enough time to turn on the unit, find a good sight picture, tag the target in a spot that is one kill, then pull the trigger and move the second pip to the tag pip. BTW, it is also VERY easy to lose the tag at long ranges… you move the weapon a little too far away and it releases and you have to start over.

    One last point, the .300 winmag version of this kicks like a freaking mule. More than one of us got the ole ring around the eye socket. They need to either better cushion the eye piece or make some adjustment to the system because to see clearly (it is an LED screen you are actually looking into inside the scope), you have to have your eye right up to the scope or you cannot see it… Unlike regular scopes where you can adjust things so you don’t get eye scoped, you cannot do that with the tracking point and when it kicks back, let me tell you it hurts like hell..

    • Russ October 20, 2014, 6:07 pm

      good info Jake

    • Matthew August 17, 2015, 12:51 pm

      Crystal clear. I think you are right but anyway the prices are a bit high comparing other brands. 300 grain Lapua Magnum again very impressive. There s another authority website reviewing such high quality website here http://www.progunowner.com/best-rifle-scope-reviews/

  • boomer2010 October 20, 2014, 1:34 pm

    I watched my neighbor hit within 5inch group on target 3 out of 3.
    without 50,000 worth of equipment.

  • Dick Peterson October 20, 2014, 11:42 am

    Wow. So this an advancement of the sport? If so, and if your phone can operate the whole shebang, the next logical step will be to use it remotely from your sofa while eating Cheezy Poofs and drinking Mountain Dew.

    • William Novak October 20, 2014, 12:29 pm

      I agree . Not exactly hunting.

      • Ken October 24, 2014, 9:25 pm

        agreed, not hunting at all. What happens if there is a hunter shooting the same animal and he is only 200 yds away from the animal but there is a small hill between the sniper gun and the 1000yd mark?. bang, the hunter gets his head shot off.,when the poor guy is doing the honest stalk and hunt. If you have to invent the thing, leave it on the range and for the braggers when they go to the bar afterwards

  • John L October 20, 2014, 11:27 am

    I will wait until they get a 100 mile range. That way I can fly a drone with go pro, spot an elk, and take it down from my back yard in Phoenix. Then I can give the gps coordinates to a meat processor for pickup and have the meat delivered to my house. No more snow laden tent and subfreezing temperatures for me. Plus I will save a lot on hunting boots.

    • Russ October 20, 2014, 6:01 pm

      THAT IS FUNNY!
      Thanks John.

  • ben October 20, 2014, 10:56 am

    unfortunately to me it seems like you’re not even a shooter no more all you do is point tag pull the trigger to the cross it back over and then it goes off by itself not when you actually pull the trigger kind of retarded to me .might as well let the computer do the whole thing on the computer mounting system.because that’s basically what it is because if you pull the trigger and it doesn’t go off and it you have to wait till you get the crosshairs over you’re not the one shooting

  • woodguy October 20, 2014, 10:25 am

    Where’s the challenge? Where’s the fun?

  • Dino October 20, 2014, 10:04 am

    When a list of factors that affect distance shooting starts with gravity and distance, but then doesn’t list wind as number two, it comes off sounding like a hard sell rather than an objective look at the pros and cons. Later on when it does mention wind, it makes it sound like that is the only reason the percentage isn’t 100%, again this comes off sounding like a hard sell. This plays to those that don’t understand fire control and ballistic solutions, not to those who make investments in weapon systems. The books by Litz do a much better job of explaining the issues and factors leading to first round hits. The uncertainties in wind play a much larger role than what is being stated here, even if all the factors this instrument measures could be known perfectly.

  • Alleyoop October 20, 2014, 9:36 am

    It’s my opinion that they’re not making this gun for trained snipers to use in war. But instead, are making it for the average Joe that doesn’t have and doesn’t want to be a trained sniper but wants to make a long distance ethical kill. It’s also my opinion that the average Joe won’t be able to afford such a piece of technology.

    • Russ October 20, 2014, 5:58 pm

      Exactly Alleyoop !
      If I were rich I would take 1 right now, maybe 2.

  • Wade Brown October 20, 2014, 9:25 am

    The report understates how hard it is for shooters, even highly trained shooters, to estimate winds at ranges beyond 600 yards. Imagine you are shooting from an elevated position at an animal and the trajectory of your shot is well above ground for 80% of the flight, what indicators do you have for the wind? No vegetation, dust, leaves, etc. what the system does is not all that hard because the hard part of long distance shooting is understanding the wind. I run a 1,000 yard practice league every Thursday night during the Summer and I can put brand new shooters behind my gun that is zero’ed for 1,000 yards and with estimate for the wind and the vast majority of the them will be in the black first shot. That is a very similar operation to what the author talked about in the article.
    Before bad mouthing the Army’s first round hit rate of 5% at 1,000 yards you need to imagine what the hit rate of those in the article if people were shooting back at them, or if their shooting position was compromised and they were trying to maintain good form while crouched behind a rock for cover. Recall the situation I talked about where the hunter was shooting from an elevated position over clear air a sniper on overwatch may have a very similar situation.

    wade

    • Brad October 20, 2014, 1:10 pm

      Exactly. The wind makes and brakes us all.

      • Methadras October 20, 2014, 3:16 pm

        Actually, my wind can make or break us all. 😀

    • Brad October 20, 2014, 1:10 pm

      Exactly. The wind makes and brakes us all.

    • Brad October 20, 2014, 1:11 pm

      Exactly. The wind makes and breaks us all.

      • David Harvey September 27, 2017, 11:36 pm

        Sure, I also think like you, the wind can ruin everything.

  • Slappy October 20, 2014, 6:20 am

    That’s a lot of glass on top of that gun. If a trained sniper see’s that binocular looking thing chances are they are going to shoot it. Know you gear, shoot your gun and 1000 yards is not an issue with a .308, .300 WIN MAG, or a .338. Send that thing to Iraq where the temps on a roof will get 136 Degrees in the summer. My guess the electronics will not last, then soak it in salt water for a few hours. New is not always better, but it always cost more.

    • Ringo October 20, 2014, 8:55 am

      Agreed, in a covered stationary fixed position (like a shooting range) or building it would probably work wonders. Once the snipers position has be compromised and he has to bug out fast, chances are that he will have to leave that barbell in order to run and save his own life. In wartime or SHTF I would trust my FN Spr .308 with a LR Leupold scope or my .338 LM with a LR Nightforce to do the job. Practice, practice, practice.

      • Dana Fitrakis October 20, 2014, 9:29 am

        I agree on a lot of what you said however the technology is not going away. A PC once filled a whole room in 5-10 years I think this is the same size or just slightly bigger than a good March optic. When this happens it will become widely used and issued. Personally I like shooting distance the good “old fashioned” way and my hit percentage is a hell of a lot higher than 5% it is closer to 70% but that is with a ton of time using my weapon and training and training and studying and shooting a lot. Good idea and great technology I will be interested when it is micro sized because tagging a target when your under stress and fire and then being able to get a solution quicker would be nice.

    • Joe October 21, 2014, 9:15 pm

      I will have to agree with Slappy. If you read most of the articles on these “high end” rifles, you will not see them tested at 110 to 140 degrees. Temps on roof does affect the working of any rifle, weather it cost $30,000 or $3,000. If you are going to sell it for $30,000 then test it!

  • Joe Bob October 20, 2014, 5:39 am

    Would like to see that US Army research data and sure do hope the quoted figure of 5% first shot hit at 1000yds was not after going thru and graduating Army Sniper School.

    • Chris October 20, 2014, 1:43 pm

      Look of Project Whitefeather. That is where the data came from. People’s perception of Snipers having “one shot one kill” is completely overblown in Media and Movies. The real percentage is closer to 5% first shot. Where is snipers skill comes in is how fast they calculate their data, and hit on the second shot.

    • Wayne Russell October 20, 2014, 9:47 pm

      An extremly interesting article on a most exciting rifle … but the glut of practical comments below present a skeptism of hard-nosed real world questions. All precise and insightful points. Adding one more, it seems questionable for variable range targets, from 100 to 1,000 yards; sight, track, and lock are possible, but barrel to target is going to need a ‘smart’ bullet.

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