6.5 Creedmoor vs. 300 Win Mag: Showdown

This may seem like an odd comparison, but I cannot count the number of times I have been in a gun store listening to either the “gun guru” behind the counter, or the “expert sniper” on the other side talking about how the 6.5 Creedmoor is like a 300 Win Mag without the recoil.  The 6.5 Creedmoor is also touted as a long range big game caliber like the 300 Win Mag.

The 6.5 Creedmoor and the 300 Win Mag are often compared as long range cartridges.

Let’s dive into the ballistics and see how they compare.  To keep things fair we will compare both calibers using bullets with the highest ballistic coefficient (BC) that can be pushed to a reasonable velocity.  Then let’s compare bullets with the highest BC that are recommended for hunting by the manufacturer. We will also use velocities that are obtained with common barrel lengths for each cartridge.

For the 300 Win Mag, the load we will use is a Berger 215 Hybrid Target bullet with a G1 BC of .691 and a G7 BC of .354 pushed to a velocity of 2886 fps.  For the 6.5 Creedmoor, we will look at a Hornady 147 ELD-M with a G1 BC of .697 and a G7 BC of .351 pushed to a velocity of 2700 fps. Each load will be compared at 500 and 1000 yards at an elevation of 2500 ft. and a temperature of 70 degrees with a 100 yard zero.  This standard for atmosphere and sight in will be used for all data.

6.5 Creedmoor/300 Win Mag

Range (yrds.)Drop (in.)Drift 10 mph (in.)Velocity (fps)Energy (ft/lbs.)
50051.4 / 43.812.1 / 10.82139 / 23111494 / 2550
1000295.6 / 252.354.9 / 48.51649 / 1806887 / 1558

As you can see the 6.5 Creedmoor falls short of the 300 Win Mag.  It’s really close. We should also consider recoil and cost to shoot. Let’s look at hunting loads.

First, let’s establish some minimum standards for the energy required to take down a deer and an elk.  For the deer let’s use the longtime standard of a 30-30 Winchester with an average 150-grain flat base bullet at 150 yards, this produces 1000 ft/lbs of energy.  For elk let’s use the old standard of a 30-06 firing an average 180-grain bullet at 400 yards which produces 1536 ft/lbs of energy. I know that there has been game shot at longer distances with each of these cartridges, but those are safe numbers.

The 30-30 Winchester and 30-06 Springfield have been used for big game hunting for over 100 years. There is a lot of data available on effective range of these two cartridges.

A 6.5 Creedmoor with a 143 grain ELD-X bullet going 2700 fps reaches the minimum energy to kill a deer at just over 750 yards, it reaches the minimum energy to kill an elk at 400 yards.  A 300 Win Mag firing a 210 Berger VLD hunting bullet at 2900 fps will have enough energy to kill a deer at past 1200 yards and an elk at just past 900 yards. Obviously, these numbers only take into consideration the energy required and don’t consider whether the shooter is skilled enough or should be shooting those distances. 

Species Max Range 6.5 CreedmoorMax Range 300 Win Mag
Deer (Min Energy 1000 ft/lbs.)750 Yards1200 Yards
Elk (Min Energy 1500 ft/lbs.)400 Yards900 Yards

 

These max ranges are based on the energy required and do not take into account the minimum velocity required to expand bullets.  It also assumes an accurate shooting system (including the shooter) to make long-range first round hits. The 300 Win Mag clearly wins.

Does this mean that everyone should sell their 6.5 Creedmoor and get a 300 Win Mag? NO!  I love the 6.5 Creedmoor and shoot it at long range all the time at targets. I would also not hesitate to take it hunting understanding its limitations.  The 6.5 Creedmoor was designed to win accuracy contests shooting targets. The cartridge and chamber specs submitted to SAMMI are specified for match accuracy.  There are a lot of over the counter ammunition and rifle options that are inherently accurate at long range. The 300 Win Mag was designed at a time when all manufacturers cared about was high velocity with light bullets so that they could advertise speed.  Setting one up for long range accuracy means that you pretty much have to have a custom rifle built and hand load for it.

Links to the loads used

https://www.hornady.com/ammunition/rifle/6.5-creedmoor-147-gr-eld-match#!/

https://www.hornady.com/ammunition/rifle/6-5-creedmoor-143-gr-eld-x-precision-hunter#!/

https://www.natchezss.com/berger-tactical-rifle-ammunition-300-win-mag-215-gr-hybrid-otm-2886-fps-20-ct.html

For the hunting load, I assumed that because there is a factory 215 going 2886 fps that the 210 VLD could be pushed to 2900 fps, but it would have to be a hand load.

 

 

 

About the author: David Kynoch is a long time hunter and shooter. He has successfully competed in NRA Long Range competitions for many years winning state and regional matches. He also competes in 3 gun. Currently he operates a custom rifle business building custom long range hunting and competition rifles.

{ 54 comments… add one }
  • Joe April 24, 2019, 11:15 pm

    7MM-08, 140 grain, is my round
    Before any 24 , 30 caliber round. Deer don’t run at all with this caliber. 300 is great for Elk.

  • Kimberpross April 18, 2019, 11:21 am

    I’ll join the age old arguments, even though the true answer is shot placement. For whitetail, the 25 cal. bullet +/- is optimal. However, I use a 308 win. as my go to gun. This covers the range I can reasonable shoot with ample energy, light recoil and acceptable accuracy for hunting. Ammo is affordable due to military use volume manufacturing and very common. If you are in nowhere Montana and learned you forgot your ammo, you can likely go to the corner gas station or tavern and they will sell you some. They may not have 6mm or 6.5 mm, probably 30-06 and 270 though.

    As for knock down, I harvested a whitetail doe with the 308 at 75 yards with a perfect heart shot (Blew 1/3 of the heart away, and she ran 60 yards before going down. I doubt any caliber with that shot would have different results.

  • Dexter Winslett April 16, 2019, 10:19 am

    I will keep my .300`s thank you.

  • robert Baker April 15, 2019, 10:24 pm

    Why not compare it to a .264 winchester magnum? Much more comparable. Very similar to a 6.5 creedmore but much more velocity.

  • Donald (Donny) Stites April 15, 2019, 4:33 pm

    The Weatherby Mark V 7MM mag has better ballistic than a 6.5 Creedmoor and is more comparable than the 300. I have all three and prefer the 7MM over 6.5 all day!

  • Joe April 15, 2019, 12:27 pm

    I would rather see a comparison between the 300win mag and the 300wby mag. For the everyday shooter the win mag is fine. But I would rather have the wby mag any day. I have both. And shoot both. But if I’m going for big game I leave the win mag at home. It just doesn’t have that reach out and touch you power that the wby. Does.
    I’m not bad mouthing it. That’s just my opinion. And everyone has their own. So happy shooting

  • Tommy Barrios April 15, 2019, 11:53 am

    My brother recently got on the 6.5 Creedmore craze and purchased three of them, two Ruger Americans (one for his son) and one in the AR platform(silenced)!

    He took two deer this season, from which he retrieved the bullets, with the Ruger American with two different 6.5 rounds and BOTH did exceptionally well, WOW, did they ever do their job!

    Venison in the freezer!

  • Tommy Barrios April 15, 2019, 11:34 am

    WHAT is LOST on MOST everyone in this ridiculous argument is a little thing called, “Maximum Transfer of Energy” (well not so little)!
    THAT is the ONLY thing that MATTERS!
    How you get there is all dependent on the bullet size, type of bullet, and the energy behind said bullet at “target range”!
    All that other nonsense about velocities, bullet expansion, foot pounds of energy don’t mean squat IF the bullet does NOT achieve maximum transfer of energy to the intended target! PERIOD!
    It’s simple PHYSICS, once AGAIN!

    • cliff April 18, 2019, 1:15 am

      A perfect example is the Nosler ballistic tip. Most all of the hogs I hit with the .270 ballistic tip dropped in their tracks from that explosive energy transfer.

  • Thomas Gaffey April 15, 2019, 9:42 am

    Basically, I will shoot anything that goes BANG, while I do not have a 300 I do have most of the other firearms mentioned above, 30-06, SKS,.308,.303 Mod 99, 8mm, 5.56, and a 6.5 Creed. I shoot all of them and yes the 6.5 is easy to shoot. Here in CA most of our deer are small black tails and you’re using copper ammo, therefore lighter , flatter and faster. I bought some at a show that cranks 3k fps and groups great, recoil is low. At the other end is my M1 Garand in 30-06 thumping a 180gr at about 2800 fs (hand load) recoil is also low but that’s becuz it weighs 11 lbs. I’d hunt with either, and have, but I’m not happy toting the M1 all day, but most of our shots in CA are 200yds or less.

    • John Bibb April 16, 2019, 3:05 am

      ***
      HI TG–supposedly your load might damage the M-1 Rifle operating rod. The special .30-06 load for this rifle is a 150 grain bullet at around 2700 fps.
      ***
      John Bibb
      ***

  • Dan April 15, 2019, 8:34 am

    I don’t understand all the hype over the 6.5. It was designed originally as a target round. To compare it to a .300 magnum is not logical to quote Spock of Star Trek. The .300 Magnum was designed to be a long range, bigger game (elk and larger) cartridge – good for a lot of African plains critters. To me, the .270 is a better bet for hunting than the 6.5. It was designed for hunting from the beginning – just a necked down .30-06 case. Lighter recoil and able to group different weight bullets into the same point of impact at 100 yards. If I wanted a shorter cartridge, there is the 7mm 08.

  • mtman2 April 15, 2019, 3:55 am

    Yes + the 6.5×55 has killed everything on the planet for 117yrs.

  • chris krupp April 5, 2019, 9:26 am

    The new caliber trend lost it’s charm for me decades ago. Very simply put……It’s all been done before. I own the 6.5 Swede, 6.5 Jap, 6.5 Mann. plus many of the magnum calibers. But at 62, My days of 300 + yard shots are over unless off a rest. Find a capable caliber, The one you shoot well, And stick with it. In a practical application, That works for you. I’m speaking of hunting here. And on any given game, I go for heavier as opposed to lighter calibers, To make a clean one shot kill. Without completely destroying the carcass of the animal. (meatcutter and processor)
    If the 6.5 Creedmoor does it for you? Go for it. But do some research on existing calibers, That were developed near a 100 years ago, And you might find much of the hoopla ? Is pointless.

  • J. Brown April 5, 2019, 7:56 am

    I have never used a 6.5 Creedmore, but shot a 300 magnum, fast super, accurate, and deadly. In my opinion the best reason to own a 300 is that its 30 caliber. If you hand your own ammo, you have an unlimited choice in bullet weight and design. 300 brass and bullets are easy to find, 6.5 Creedmoor I don’t know. I guess if I owned a 6.5, I have as much as I needed. I don’t object to using either caliber, they both serve their purpose and satisfy their owners.

  • Chris April 4, 2019, 10:03 pm

    The whole point of higher BC calibers is improved long range performance. Typically going with a 150 grain 30/06 or .308 traveling at service rifle velocity of 2800fps as the standard, you can take a 7mm or 6.5 of around 140 grains and shoot similar trajectory with less velocity, muzzle blast and recoil. That is appealing to many shooters. Of course you can get the same BC with a 220 grain 30cal. It’s just a noisier, more punishing, and more expensive experience.
    A 6.5 Creedmoor was never intended to be a 300 win mag. It is more efficient than 30 cal cartridges of similar bullet weights though.

  • Chris April 4, 2019, 9:59 pm

    The whole point of higher BC calibers is improved long range performance. Typically going with a 150 grain 30/06 or .308 traveling at service rifle velocity of 2800fps as the standard, you can take a 7mm or 6.5 of around 140 grains and shoot similar trajectory with less velocity, muzzle blast and recoil. That is appealing to many shooters. Of course you can get the same BC with a 220 grain 30cal. It’s just a noisier, more punishing, and more expensive experience.

  • Ken Roy April 3, 2019, 11:37 pm

    Did you ever hear of the 6.5 Gibbs? As I recall, it got close to 3100 fps with a 139 gr. Sierra (Match King I think). I had one built with a 722 Rem action and a Shielen 24″ barrel. Low recoil and it would really reach out there. I also had an old model 70 Winchester in .264. The 6.5 Gibbs was extremely accurate. Unfortunately, someone stole it. I’ll bet they had a hell of a time finding ammo for it.

    • Oohrah April 15, 2019, 6:50 am

      You don’t hear too much these days of Rocky Gibbs Wildcats. I still have my 30 Gibbs, and it did take awhile to learn how to fire form the cases. It is a power house over the standard 30-06 that is it’s parent. Like you said, someone will have quite a time figuring out it looks funny not knowing what it is. I found a case full of 4831 some where around 60 grains, with a 180 grain bullets are nice load. Velocity is somewhere around 2900 fps. Sorry some low life got into your personal things.

  • Piwetz James April 3, 2019, 9:01 pm

    I have two huge gun safes crammed with everything from .22 to .416, 99% are safe queens. I’ve been hunting for over 60 years in the US, Mexico and Canada and have three go to rifles for anything I ever care to hunt. My all time favorite is my custom built 220 Swift which has killed a truck load of white tails that never took a step after the shot. For mulies my Browning B78 in 2506 is the perfect ticket and my custom 3006 on a Remington 700 action will take down anything on the continent. I also have a custom built 300 WM which I never use due to the recoil and rediculous overkill for most NA game. The 3006 will do anything the 300 will and is much easier on the shoulder, ears and wallet!

    • david craig April 4, 2019, 10:51 pm

      Enjoy the insane asylum.

    • Grady Poteat April 15, 2019, 11:37 am

      I have to agree with you. I had a 300 Win mag once. Could not tell it killed any farther or any better nor was any more accurate than my 30-06 so I got rid of it. It was just louder, cost more to shoot, and kicked more. I finished my hunting carrier last season after 70 seasons in the woods and more kills than I can remember. I never got the magnum bug nor the fad caliber bug as I found the standard tried and true rounds always worked for me. Never had any use for rounds less than .277 or .284. And I have made shots at distances that most would not try.

  • David Lee Valdina April 3, 2019, 4:31 pm

    It is misleading to talk about energy levels as a way of determining killing power on big game. A bullet needs to penetrate to where the killing takes place. A .220 Swift has lots of energy, but you would not want to use it hunting big game. For years the credit for the largest Elk ever shot went to the .30-40 Krag. My P.H. in South Africa was a big believer in big and slow as the way to go. A heavily constructed bullet getting through the heart or brain will kill reliably. Just my perspective. ps: The 156 gr. 6.5×55 will kill anything on the planet.

  • John Bowen April 3, 2019, 3:11 pm

    The Owners themselves of 6.5 have talked me right out of the 6.5. If I got one I doubt I could generate the man size stories that make the 6.5 the greatest round ever made for squirrels to elephants from 25 meters to 5000.

    Funniest look I get from them is when I asked them if they ever heard of the 6.5×55. The vast majority of them think the caliber had been hidden from man by the shooting gods only to be dropped on them in 2007.

    Me I love my 308 7.62 and the challenges it presents. I want a round that makes me work for success not hands it to me for just buying the latest fad.

    However I must admit as I age I am convinced that my next build that will be started this year will be a 7mm08 it will remove some of the punishment from the shooting and give me a true 1200yd. Round.

  • Patrick K ONeil April 3, 2019, 2:37 pm

    One other thing to consider: throat erosion. The 6.5 creedmoor suffers more erosion faster than the 300 winmag. Longer barrel life for 300 vs 6.5.

  • David C Thatcher April 3, 2019, 2:12 pm

    I will use my “Ole Wood Chopper” that’s been around since 1958. You wonder what I’m talking about???? Well it’s the 264 Win Mag I have used it sine 1964 and would not trade it for the little 6.5 Creedmoor, or big brother the 300 Wing Mag. Now anything they can do the 264 Win Mag is up to the challenge The Nosler Trophy Grade ammo is the real ticket, and comes in several Bullet sizes and loads. My favorite is the 130 Grain Nosler . Unless I’m shooting “Ole Grizz” or his Big Brother “Brownie” Those rascals require something bigger than either one of the calibers listed in this article. Just to let you folks know when the 264 was introduced in 1958 it was considered the first long range rifle of it’s day. I still have some ‘OLD” Winchester ammo which was “Factory Loaded” at 3200 Ft (muzzle) , and 3180 FT (energy) Now that’s awful hard to beat!!! The 100 grain load would scare most better to death, 3800 Ft (muzzle)!!!!!!!!!!! Any how you can have the Creedmoor or big brother as far as this ole fart is concerned remember boys ” Windage and Elevation”

  • Blair April 3, 2019, 12:05 pm

    I don’t hunt, or I would probably choose the 300 Win Mag. There’s nothing like shooting steel at long ranges with a 6.5 and basically being your own spotter since the recoil is so low. Not to mention that you can shoot that thing all day long and your shoulder has no idea you were even at the range. Again, for its intended purpose, the 6.5 is an excellent choice.

    • john t. fox April 3, 2019, 2:33 pm

      THE PROBLEM WITH RECOIL WHEN HUNTING IS THAT YOU CAN’T GET BACK THAT FIRST SHOT! THE FIRST SHOT WHEN HUNTING, IS ALSO INTENDED TO BE YOUR LAST SHOT! THE RECOIL CAN SPOIL AN EASY SHOT AND CAUSE YOU TO MISS. SHOOTING A LOW RECOIL RD MAKES THAT FIRST SHOT COUNT EVERY TIME! ME PERSONALLY, I WOULD SHOOT AN SKS 7.62X39MM BECAUSE IT HAS GOOD KNOCK DOWN POWER, YOU CAN SHOOT IT WITH ACCURACY UP TO ABOUT 600 YARDS, AND IT HAS THE RECOIL OF A .22 RIFLE. YOU HAVE TO BE FAMILIAR WITH YOUR HUNTING AREA BEFORE YOU GO HUNTING. THAT WAY YOU KNOW HOW FAR YOUR SHOTS WILL BE, AND THE BEST LOCATIONS TO SHOOT FROM. KNOWING THIS, YOU CAN DETERMINE HOW MUCH GUN YOU NEED TO KILL YOUR PREY. IF YOU ARE AT HIGH ELEVATIONS YOU CAN EXTEND THE EFFECTIVE RANGE OF YOUR RDS. A 7MM REM MAG HAS A LOT OF RECOIL, AND YOU CAN EASILY MISS WITH IT! YOU HAVE TO GET USED TO THE RECOIL BEFORE YOU GO HUNTING. IF YOU KNOW THAT YOUR SHOTS ARE GOING TO BE UNDER 500 YDS, GO WITH THE LOW RECOIL GUN. IF YOU KNOW THAT YOUR SHOTS WILL BE UNDER 400 YDS, THEN CONSIDER AN SKS. 122 GR HP, 124 SP, 154 GR SP RDS WILL TAKE DOWN DEER IN THEIR TRACKS WHILE RUNNING. I WOULD TRY THE 154 GRN SP RD FOR AN ELK UP TO 400 YDS, AT A HIGH ELEVATION..

      • Xman April 3, 2019, 7:38 pm

        Your caps lock button is on.

        • Billy bob April 4, 2019, 10:02 pm

          and youre full of it too – hitting a running deer or stationary deer with an SKS at 500yds… Wow that’d be some feat! Carlos H maybe could do that, but for the rest of us, that’s dreaming.

          • MikeJ. April 16, 2019, 12:53 am

            I shot a raccoon walking across a plowed field in MN with a Rem. .243 at 800 yards. One shot, kinda lucky? I could break a barb wire fence at 200 yards with that rifle. But I was a Marine marksmanship instructor. These days my, high end glass, “sniper” rifle is a 30.06.

  • Buddy April 3, 2019, 11:46 am

    Lets compare bullets for big game.The Berger 215 is not a good bullet for elk.People will continue to use it though.It is a match bullet built for a higher b.c. not intended to be used on elk.The 147 gr eld is a match bullet not designed to be used on elk.Lets compare hunting bullets and the gap will be greater between them.And what muzzle energy have you deemed to be enough for elk?

  • George April 3, 2019, 11:38 am

    BS. I shoot 220 and heavier bullets in my .300WM all the time. It’s a perfect comparison between both rounds on a level playing field. Put any bullet you want in the .300 and it still whips the Creedmoor’s ass at KE.

  • Michael A. Gilliam April 3, 2019, 11:38 am

    I’m glad to see an article finally putting that silly comparison to rest.

  • Ken Miller April 3, 2019, 10:38 am

    I’ve no experience with the 6.5 with the exception of reading online articles as this & others. Thank-you for Your excellent comparison between the technical points of each round. I’m sure any true hunter will take into account personal limitations as well as optics & firearm being used. I feel a 6.5 is a target load for the range & the 300 is the first choice of ethical hunters.

    • Wild Bill April 3, 2019, 12:50 pm

      I own both. The 6.5 is nice as a range round. Low recoil so you can spot for yourself. My 300 Win Mag is a bit of a thumper even in a target configuration.
      About the same as my 338 Lapua. I have a thing for long range shooting . If I had to take a shot on an animal the 300 would be my choice.

  • Mike April 3, 2019, 10:29 am

    Looks like the US has finally realized the utility of the 6.5 bullet. I’ve been shooting various 6.5’s for years. Today I have rifles in 6.5×55, 6.5×54 Mannlicher/Schoenauer, 260 Remington, and 264 Win Mag. The 6.5 Creedmoor is probably a good cartridge, but it is so close to the 260 I have to wonder why it was ever made. Too bad the gun writers didn’t give the 260 the press they gave the 6.5 Creedmoor.

    • Nick April 3, 2019, 5:12 pm

      I completely agree, the .260 Rem will always have the edge over the 6.5 Cre…
      Marketing and the wider use of social media, plus Remington’s parent company dropped the ball a long time ago for customer relations.

  • Keary Ritchie April 3, 2019, 10:13 am

    Yaa, I think you should have compared it to a 180 gn. bullet. I can’t even imagine shooting a 215 gn. slug at that velocity, would be murder on the body. I’m pretty sure the bolt wouldn’t open.

  • Major AW Oliver April 3, 2019, 9:57 am

    Why miss lead the public.
    The 6.5 CM is not an Elk Gun. Most that have hunted these animals a lifetime would agree.
    The Momentum of lager bullets you leave out. The limits you speak of most hunters who would think their wouldbe sniper rifle will get that Elk.
    You for sure outlined the details of what this fine long range target round, the 6.5 was built for.
    At the same time to use the highest BC for a Hunting round measurement seems a bit out of sorts as well. The 180gr. 300win @ 2900-3000fps. load is the most popular Elk load going because at realistic, for most Hunters and conditions, it works. Bullet choices are also key, the Constitution and construction of “Big Game, “like Elk” getter’s” require much more than just hitting an animal. Why, back in the day, Nosler Partitions and now Barns X-bullets, Lead the way. The full sized exit wound with a bone bashing and hydrostatic shock from a large bore, like a .30 cal. Is much more likely to get the human kill. To shoot any animal beyond the “Field” conditions capability is not even addressed. Sir, as one who really appreciates your writing, I just suggest that 90% of Hunters don’t spend the time on Range to shoot 400 yard kill shots on Elk. Your writing stirs, low skilled and inexperienced to take shots out of their skill level. This leaves animals suffering, and gives the antigunners another reason to hate us.
    Please leave all with the facts that “training and experience”, to a high standard is the only way to even think about a 400yd shot on an Elk with most any quality Big game cartridge. 900yrds. 99% should never even think about taking. It can be accomplished but that does not mean it is good advise.

  • Major AW Oliver April 3, 2019, 9:56 am

    Why miss lead the public.
    The 6.5 CM is not an Elk Gun. Most that have hunted these animals a lifetime would agree.
    The Momentum of lager bullets you leave out. The limits you speak of most hunters who would think their wouldbe sniper rifle will get that Elk.
    You for sure outlined the details of what this fine long range target round, the 6.5 was built for.
    At the same time to use the highest BC for a Hunting round measurement seems a bit out of sorts as well. The 180gr. 300win @ 2900-3000fps. load is the most popular Elk load going because at realistic, for most Hunters and conditions, it works. Bullet choices are also key, the Constitution and construction of “Big Game, “like Elk” getter’s” require much more than just hitting an animal. Why, back in the day, Nosler Partitions and now Barns X-bullets, Lead the way. The full sized exit wound with a bone bashing and hydrostatic shock from a large bore, like a .30 cal. Is much more likely to get the human kill. To shoot any animal beyond the “Field” conditions capability is not even addressed. Sir, as one who really appreciates your writing, I just suggest that 90% of Hunters don’t spend the time on Range to shoot 400 yard kill shots on Elk. Your writing stirs, low skilled and inexperienced to take shots out of their skill level. This leaves animals suffering, and gives the antigunners another reason to hate us.
    Please leave all with the facts that “training and experience”, to a high standard is the only way to even think about a 400yd shot on an Elk with most any quality Big game cartridge. 900yrds. 99% should never even think about taking. It can be accomplished but that does not mean it is good advise.

    • David Reed April 3, 2019, 11:08 am

      I think the writer (David) did a good job both literally and scientifically explaining the very complaints you mention. He set a foundation of parameters to compare the two rounds and was very careful not to suggest that long range shots were recommended by skilled or unskilled shooters per the limitations of both rounds. I think he did a very fair comparison. Maybe we read different articles.

  • David Keith April 3, 2019, 9:37 am

    6.5 – Boring. zzzzzzz

  • Gerald Berry April 3, 2019, 9:35 am

    Excellent article. At the preface for the ‘gun counter talk’, my intial thought was. ” How much energy on target do you need at distance?”. And, the science spoke for itself.

  • James Pedersen April 3, 2019, 9:00 am

    I have shot both but for over20 years I have used a 300win mag I am sold on it

  • James Morrison April 3, 2019, 8:46 am

    Excellent comparison article. I respect factual articles that show the numbers. I like both platforms at the range. If I am hunting in Wyoming or Montana, my 700 Remington in 300 Winchester Magnum is the go to rifle.

    • miles v bush jr April 3, 2019, 11:31 am

      Bin shooting 300 for many years at 300 to 400 yards for whitetail.Of course I sand bag.understand your rifle and what it can do.i reload 165gr seirra spitzer BT and don’t think one went more than 30yrds.(wv).

  • Jim Fleming April 3, 2019, 6:41 am

    Thanks for the great side-by-side comparison, David. It was for this reason that I purchased the Weatherby Mark V 6.5-300. It has the accuracy of the 6.5 Creedmoor and the power of the 300 Win Mag… a nice combination! Please consider publishing a comparison of the 6.5–300 WBY with the 300 Win Mag.

    • Brian April 3, 2019, 9:43 am

      Man, 6.5-300…. does Weatherby include a new barrel in each box of ammunition? 😀

      I’m joking of course, but from what I understand a combination of small bore and big powder/high velocity leads to shorter barrel life and I’m curious how real a concern that is for the hunter and occasional paper-puncher.

      • Jim April 3, 2019, 11:03 am

        One of the reports suggested that the Krieger barrel was good for 4000 rounds or so. At $3/round, that will be a long way off… most likely after I am dead and buried!

  • Chick April 3, 2019, 5:44 am

    You lost it when you went to a 215 gr bullet.

    • Brian April 3, 2019, 9:46 am

      What did he lose? I’m not sure what you mean.

      • Heath April 3, 2019, 3:43 pm

        Where he lost it for me is trying to compare 2 different weight bullets. As Major AW Oliver says above. Most people don’t shoot 215 gr. ammo out of a 300 Win … I myself stick to a 185gr which has a higher muzzle vel. as well as flatter trajectory. If you compare apples to apples and not watermelons and bananas here you will see the 300 is far superior to the 6.5 creedmoor. Yes I have both and love shooting them for different things. But to replace the 300 with a 6.5 or even suggest they are similar is ludicrous.

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