Inland Manufacturing 30 M-1 Carbine

 

You can now buy a newly manufactured Inland M-1 30 Carbine–we’ll get to that in a minute but before we do some background is appropriate…

The .30 M-1 Carbine was used by the U.S. Military in WWII, Korea, and Vietnam. The carbine was supplied to allied forces and hung around long after Vietnam. I encountered the M-1 carbine in service with the Bolivian UMOPAR counter-drug police in the 1990s. These fun guns remain popular and effective for civilians today.

The idea for the carbine sprang from complaints that the M-1 Garand rifle was too big and bulky for support troops. A small light gun was more convenient for specialists encumbered with heavy weapons, radios or other gear. If you have ever tried to sling a Garand (43.6 inches long and weighing 9.5 pounds) and then use both hands for another task, you understand. This led to a competition in 1941 by major U.S. firearm companies and designers.

The Ordnance Bureau rejected the first carbines designs submitted. As depicted in the 1952 movie Carbine Williams starring James Stewart, Winchester hired David Marshall “Carbine” Williams after his release from prison. Williams had designed a short-stroke gas piston system while serving his prison sentence at a North Carolina facility.

Winchester had produced a full sized .30-06 rifle, the M-2, as a competitor to the Garand. Williams lightened and improved the M-2 by incorporating his short-stroke piston into the design. Major René Studler of the Ordnance Corps believed this rifle design could be scaled down to a carbine and demanded a prototype as soon as possible.

Thirteen days later, Winchester engineers pieced together a crude prototype using the trigger housing from a Winchester M1905 rifle and a modified Garand operating rod. Improvements continued and the M1 Carbine was approved on October 22, 1941. The first M-1 Carbines were delivered in mid-1942, with initial priority given to troops in Europe.

Winchester did the design work, but in 1941, the US was mobilizing for wartime production. Several companies geared up to make carbines. Inland Manufacturing, a division of General Motors was destined to produce nearly 3 million firearms in less than 5 years.

The Inland Division produced 1,984,189 M-1 Carbines, 140,000 M-1A1 folding stock Carbines, 500,000 M-2 full auto Carbines, and 811 M3(T3) night vision Carbines. The original cost of the M-1 carbine was $42.00

T3 infrared carbine US Army Photo

Of the 6,110,730 carbines built during WW2, Inland was the only supplier that made all four types of carbines, producing 2,625,000 or 43% of the total. Inland was the only manufacturer of the M1A1 folding stock, paratroop version, and was one of only two companies that made the M2 version with selective fire.  Inland also was one of two companies that made the M3(T3) carbine with infrared night sight.

The M-3 carbine was first used in combat during the invasion of Okinawa. The scope would be used to detect Japanese units infiltrating at night. The M-3 carbine had no iron sights, it used the M2 infrared night sight and illuminator with an effective range of about 70 yards even in total darkness.

In his book, US Infantryman in World War II, Robert Rush estimates that thirty percent of Japanese casualties inflicted small arms fire during the Okinawa campaign were caused by the M3 carbine.

Fun Fact: Some 240,000 M-1 Carbines were declared surplus in 1963 and sold to NRA members for a $20 each. Today, there is a warehouse in South Korea, filled with M-1 Carbines waiting to come home. Mr. President, we might not be able to build a wall right now, but can we please bring these American carbines back?

Newly Manufactured Inland Manufacturing 30 M-1

You may have missed out on $20 carbines, but the new Inland Manufacturing is making carbines again, in Dayton, Ohio, just two miles from the original WW2 facility.

My Inland M-1 Carbine came from my uncle. It has a 300,000 serial was made in late 1942. Sometime in the 1950’s it was arsenal rebuilt and got some new parts. Adjustable sights, a bayonet lug, and a new safety lever. It went through at least one war, possibly two or three. The stock is dark and dented, it still has the original stock marked with the serial number. The finish on the metal is good, the strength of the parkerization is amazing.

My carbine is very reliable. I should replace the recoil spring. Even if they replaced it in the 50’s it is overdue a change. The Carbine was not designed to be extremely accurate, but with Creedmoor ammo, I was able to hold a 2-inch group off the bench at 50 yards. It would have been tighter if I was a better shot. At 100 yards, shooting off hand I was able to keep my hits on a half scale silhouette at 100 yards.

The recoil is similar to an AR. The 110-grain bullet moving 2000 FPS has plenty of energy and I would have absolute confidence in it out to 100 yards.

 

The M-1 1945 carbines feature many of the same characteristics of the original Inland Carbines and are manufactured in the USA!

M-1 1945 Carbine Photo by Inland Manufacturing

The M-1 1945 carbine is modeled after the last production model that Inland manufactured in 1945 and features a type 3 bayonet lug / barrel band, adjustable rear sights, push button safety, round bolt, “low wood” walnut stock, and a 15–round magazine. A 30 round mag catch was used to allow high–capacity magazines.

 

SPECS – New Inland Manufacturing M1

Caliber: .30 carbine
Magazine capacity: 15
Barrel length: 18”
Total length: 35.75”
Barrel groove: 4
Twist rate: 1 x 20”
Weight: 5lb 3oz
MSRP: $1139.00

Ammunition

The .30 Carbine round remains a good choice for hunting and home defense.  It gained a reputation for under-performance in Korea and Vietnam which has been attributed to ammunition produced with lower velocities than the WW2 rounds.

The .30 Carbine is twice as powerful as the WW2 .45ACP caliber submachine guns. The M-1 carbine is half the weight of a Thompson submachine gun and provides better range, accuracy, and penetration.  Lighter than the .45 ACP, soldiers armed with the carbine can carry more ammunition. The ammunition was also cheaper to manufacture than 30.06 or .45ACP.  This was very important, especially when making millions of rounds in a wartime economy.

The popularity of the M-1 carbine for collecting, sporting and reenactments have resulted in continued civilian popularity of the cartridge. M-1 carbine Matches began in the 1950s and in 2006, they were reintroduced as part of the National Matches and CMP Travel Games.

Creedmoor Sports is now making .30 Carbine 110 Gr Rifle Ammunition. Made in Anniston, Alabama, Creedmoor’s .30 Carbine Rifle Ammunition combines Starline Brass with Hornady 110 gr FMJ bullets. It is available in 50 count boxes for $37.50. Buy five or more for $35.62 each.

Creedmoor .30 Carbine 110 Gr Rifle Ammunition Specifications:

YardsFPSEnergy ft/lbs.
Muzzle2,000977
1001,601626

Magazines

During WW2, Korea, and Vietnam, the US Government contracted for millions of M-1 Carbine 15 and 30 round magazines. Some were marked and some were unmarked.

The US Government gave away approximately 5 million of the 6 million total Carbines manufactured to other countries. These countries had even more 30 rounders manufactured for their own needs, marked and unmarked. Some of these came from US wartime manufacturers and were high quality. There were also some commercial magazines of varying quality.

KCI USA 30 round M-1 Carbine magazine

Chances are, if you have old magazines around, they have probably seen better days. Since most semi-auto malfunctions are caused by magazines, you should invest in quality. KCI USA is making new high quality 15 and 30 round magazines for the M-1 carbines.

We are in a new golden age of the carbine. Long before AR pistol caliber carbines were conceived, the M-1 carbine was stopping America’s enemies. It remains ready to serve. With new guns, magazines and ammunition, the M-1 is better than ever.

For information about the Inland Manufacturing M-1 1944 model click here.

***Shop GunAmerica for your next M1 30 Carbine***

 

{ 34 comments… add one }
  • Tyler July 18, 2018, 4:06 pm

    I’m glad it was pointed out the new facility is just two miles from the old… Makes a huge difference for authenticity

  • Jim July 17, 2018, 7:34 pm

    I picked up one of the new Inland 1945s. It was actually used but never shot. I have owned a number of carbines over my lifetime. I cleaned the new carbine and shot it with two 25 round mags. Functioned flawlessly. Fired 200 rounds through it with no issues. Bought a 30 round mag hat wouldn’t even seat in the carbine. Did some research and bought two 30 rounders from Keep on Shooting. Loaded 28 rounds in each and they work great. I recommend these mags for any carbine. Great quality and exonomical. I love the M1 Carbine even though I only carried M-14s and M-16s in the Corps. It is part of our history and looks good next to my Garand and M1-A,

    • Jim July 17, 2018, 7:35 pm

      Should have read “two 15 round mags.” Fingers are too dang old!

  • Mike July 16, 2018, 10:30 pm

    I bought one of the new Inland M1 A1 carbines a few years ago when this model first came out. I removed it from the box, cleaned and lubed it then took it and 4 original M1 Carbines to the range. I only used 15 round mags in all of them as the Carbine is well known for having feed trouble from the 30 round mags and my M2 jams on the 30 rounders also. I opened a 660 rd Spam can from 1969 Lake City. Loaded up a dozen 15 rd mags, grabbed the New Inland, shoved the mag in and fired 10 rounds before a jam. By the 3rd 15 round mag, no problem. Every round fed after a short break in. My original M1 Carbine made by Inland jammed a couple of times and then ran another 4 mags with no jams. My New Inland M1 Carbine is excellent and it wii be around for years. BTW, remember, the Carbine was not abdopted to replace the M 1 Garand but to replace sub guns and handguns and it did that job well.

  • Todd July 16, 2018, 9:26 pm

    OK, Let me know if I missed it in one of my three reads but I saw next to nothing about the Inland Carbine currently offered.
    I got a re-hash of well worn history, I got an introduction to the writer’s uncle’s Carbine, some stuff about magazines and ammo but THE ONE THING that I or anyone else who’s been burned by in the past – with Carbine re-pops – is woefully missing.

    IS IT PART FOR PART GI BASED?

    Todd.

  • Tom Lane July 16, 2018, 7:08 pm

    I have a new manufacture Auto Ordnance M-130. I put the type 3 barrel band on it, and the early milled adjustable sight. I can and do use it in military high power matches. It will make cloverleaf holes @ 100 yards. I’ve shot everything from softpoint generic to 1950’s mil surp with it. I get the best results with PPU FMJ. I have 3 KCI mags, one had a problem with the feed lips, but the other 2 work perfectly.

  • Rich C. July 16, 2018, 11:09 am

    I picked up an old Iver Johnson M-1 carbine back in 1980 for $120. It was a little ragged and rough around the edges, but that thing would shoot. I still have it today, and even though I now own an AR15, Mini 14 and Mini 30, That beat up little carbine is still #1 on my list for the sheer ‘fun factor’. It also gives me the same accuracy as the author’s carbine. In fact, it will shoot tighter than both of my Minis all day long….

  • Harold Croft July 16, 2018, 10:59 am

    I was a weapons instructor in the US Air Force during the Korean war at Lackland AFB. The only weapon that the trainees were trained to fire the the M1 Carbine. The last year of my service I was assigned to the weapons shack on the base firing range. I was responsible for the storing, cleaning and maintenance of the rifles. We issued any white from 75 to 225 each day. They were from a mixture of manufactures and all performed at an excellent manner. The most common problem was matching the bolt headspace to the rifles as they were assembled after cleaning. We checked the headspace on every rifle after cleaning and storage. The rifles were staggered so that the same ones did not go out on the range every day. It my opinion that the M1 Carbine is an excellent performer.

  • Shawn July 16, 2018, 10:34 am

    I really like the concept of the M1 carbine. I have several in many calibers and one that was built as a pistol.
    Rifles chambered in 30 carbine, 256 Win mag, 5.7 Johnson, 9mm, and 45 Win mag.
    The pistol is in 30 carbine.
    They are fun to shoot and great tool to teach the next generation on

  • Sundance98 July 16, 2018, 9:57 am

    Was lucky enough to acquire two Winchester’s when the Koreans let some go. One early and one late WWII… Those
    South Korean Armorers took excellent care of these items which were used quite effectively during the Korean Conflict too!

  • joefoam July 16, 2018, 8:39 am

    Bought a Universal Carbine a few years back. It has a lot of miles on it and can be fussy about what I feed it. It is light and comfortable to shoot. If I were introducing someone to rifle shooting this would be the one I would use.

  • James Graubard July 16, 2018, 8:26 am

    the new inland is the laughing stock of carbine knowledgeable people. Make sure you save the box so you can ship it back for repair when you find it does not work.

    • Ken P July 16, 2018, 12:32 pm

      James, you need to expound upon your criticism; be more specific. I bought the 1944 version of the “new” Inland carbine. I went to the range with Armscor ammo and it was a circus…one round would shoot and the next would fail to feed. I babied the 50 rounds through it and returned home to clean it. The following range trip I brought Aguila ammo. Although there were a handful of failures to feed, I had better reliability. After another box, the reliability became even better. I had some Armscor left and was going to give it to my friend who has a WWII paratrooper model M1 carbine, but decided to try it again. My carbine ate it all without a hiccup. The little gun just needed to be “broken in” which, admittedly, was a first for any firearm I’ve owned but now it’s virtually 100% reliable…even shot a bunch of surplus ammo through it without a hitch.

  • Bob July 16, 2018, 7:32 am

    The cost for a new Inland is prohibitive for a plinker. You can but a lot more rifle for $1000+. While there are surplus rifles out they are by no means reasonably priced either. Not to mention you don’t really know what you are getting with a surplus rifle.
    But I do like the .30 carbine round and it’s just plain fun and deadly accurate out of my Ruger Blackhawk mounted with a Vortex Crossfire red dot.

    • Jake July 16, 2018, 1:22 pm

      Have you ever fired the Blackhawk at night? I had one decades ago and we would wait until dark as it would put out a muzzle flash several feet long. It was a lot of fun. I wish I still had it. I would recommend reloading ammo with pistol powders that won’t be burning several feet past the muzzle.

  • Mike Rule July 16, 2018, 6:23 am

    Have a Plainfield one. Fun little rifle. Never jams always goes bang.

  • John Bibb July 16, 2018, 4:26 am

    ***
    I bought a new Auto Ordinance M1 Carbine clone from a Wyoming gun shop via internet 5 years ago. Good price–great looking. However–it was a jam-o-matic from the gitgo. Very sticky action–apparently too much parkerizing. It took fine steel wool work and synthetic gun oil to make it a smooth action. Go–No Go Gauge checks showed a good chamber. No chance to test fire it before buying it.
    ***
    A good internet article written by a real expert was a big help. On how to use super fine steel wool to polish the rough feed ramp, bolt nose, and chamber–they had tool marks. Adding a modified B-square scope mount and compact 4X Mildot scope and an under barrel green laser / weapons light made it into a very reliable very accurate weapon. It\’s a joy to shoot now.
    ***
    Beware of the American POOR \”Quality\” bulk Ammo! It has a thicker than normal cartridge case that results in the buildup of a brass \”ring\” where the case head spaces in the chamber. After a few shots the carbine refuses to fire due to the ammo inducing an out of battery problem. The far better Remington, S&B, and Hornady FTX cartridges work perfectly in this firearm. Hundreds of rounds without any misfires, FTF, or FTE failures.
    ***
    It still won\’t work with the 15 round magazine that came with it. Most 15 and 30 round aftermarket magazines are useless. Some Korean made 30 rounders weren\’t too bad. Fulton Armory 30 rounders work great–better quality and stronger magazine springs.
    ***
    I wish I had paid more for the Fulton Armory clone. I learned a lot more about M1 Carbines than I needed to know with this one. Other users didn\’t have problems with the AO clone. Maybe I got a Monday Morning gun? The ones I qualified with in the Army 5 decades ago were worn out–but they never failed to fire.
    ***
    John Bibb
    ***

  • John Bibb July 16, 2018, 4:23 am

    ***
    I bought a new Auto Ordinance M1 Carbine clone from a Wyoming gun shop via internet 5 years ago. Good price–great looking. However–it was a jam-o-matic from the gitgo. Very sticky action–apparently too much parkerizing. It took fine steel wool work and synthetic gun oil to make it a smooth action. Go–No Go Gauge checks showed a good chamber. No chance to test fire it before buying it.
    ***
    A good internet article written by a real expert was a big help. On how to use super fine steel wool to polish the rough feed ramp, bolt nose, and chamber–they had tool marks. Adding a modified B-square scope mount and compact 4X Mildot scope and an under barrel green laser / weapons light made it into a very reliable very accurate weapon. It’s a joy to shoot now.
    ***
    Beware of the American POOR “Quality” bulk Ammo! It has a thicker than normal cartridge case that results in the buildup of a brass “ring” where the case head spaces in the chamber. After a few shots the carbine refuses to fire due to the ammo inducing an out of battery problem. The far better Remington, S&B, and Hornady FTX cartridges work perfectly in this firearm. Hundreds of rounds without any misfires, FTF, or FTE failures.
    ***
    It still won’t work with the 15 round magazine that came with it. Most 15 and 30 round aftermarket magazines are useless. Some Korean made 30 rounders weren’t too bad. Fulton Armory 30 rounders work great–better quality and stronger magazine springs.
    ***
    I wish I had paid more for the Fulton Armory clone. I learned a lot more about M1 Carbines than I needed to know with this one. Other users didn’t have problems with the AO clone. Maybe I got a Monday Morning gun? The ones I qualified with in the Army 5 decades ago were worn out–but they never failed to fire.
    ***
    John Bibb
    ***

    • PF Flyer July 17, 2018, 9:31 pm

      Thanks for the info John. I had several hic ups too. Mainly the bolt wouldn’t/won’t seat completely. I’ll try the wool.

  • Wordell Fornortener July 16, 2018, 3:14 am

    I’m confused. I’ve read more than one article/opinion/review of the M 1 Carbine that rates it as under powered, not enough knockdown power, not one to use as your primary weapon in combat, not accurate…….sort of a “plinker” weapon.

    Anyone out there able to clarify the true M1stature?

    • Luke July 16, 2018, 8:58 am

      Definitely not a plinker. Gotta’ remember; a lot of those sports writers are comparing this little gun to newer weapons and calibers. Some of the rhetoric is interesting but I wouldn’t let them dictate my choices. I shot my first deer with one of these back in 1964. They’re accurate enough. And, they sure as hell accomplished the task they were designed for; ‘kept generations of Americans from speaking German and Japanese.

    • kimberpross July 16, 2018, 9:34 am

      That topic is fluid on just about every cartridge in one fashion or another. Just like the debate over 9mm, 40 cal. or 45 acp for optimal performance and knockdown, conceal carry, person protection, etc. . Take the M1 Carbine with a few boxes of ammo and practice, enjoy. If you can hit your target where you aim, it is a great tool to have, and fun to shoot. I don’t have a M1 carbine, but own a Ruger Deerfield 44 mag., which looks similar, has a similar action. I love that rifle. It will hold about 2 MOA, light recoil and a fun repeater.

    • John Bibb July 16, 2018, 1:35 pm

      ***
      HI WF–recent tests show that the M1 Carbine round is effective and penetrates lots of cold / frozen layers of clothing. Seems like the Frozen Chosin G.I’s had problems with congealed oil at the far below freezing temperatures there. Lots of jamming problems–wiping off all oil at normal temperatures was needed.
      ***
      Also–that was open mountainous territory. IIRC the maximum effective range for this round was 175 yards. The bullet drop is more than for the flat shooting M1 rifle .30-06 round. The carbine round also is more prone to cross wind problems. Seems like the troops were shooting beyond the range capability of this round. They missed the enemy troops at long ranges.
      ***
      Hornady makes an excellent FTX round that provides far better bullet expansion–the FMJ rounds required by the Hague and Geneva Conventions for Military use don’t expand at all. The far faster and heavier high power .30-06 FMJ round does a lot more high speed damage than the intermediate power carbine round does.
      ***
      John Bibb
      ***

    • Rick July 16, 2018, 5:37 pm

      There were many complaints about the M1 Carbine during WW2, but there were also many positive reviews. Audie Murphy the most decorated servicemen in WW2 carried the M1 Carbine which as the stories go saved his life on occasion. I think , as with most things, it’s personal preference. If a GI had a bad experience with the Carbine rumors started. They were also made primarily for Officers, tank crews,, artillery men etc. Front line troops sometimes looked down on them as less manly than the Garand.

    • Paul R Labrador July 17, 2018, 5:54 pm

      Underpowered compared to what? A .30-06? Sure, it’s definitely underpowered compared to that. But that’s not its role. The weapon was designed for close range self-defense out to 200-300m. While 300m is stretching it’s legs a bit, it is still plenty effective inside 200, and definitely more effective at those ranges than any pistol. There are a lot of dead bad guys who could attest to that. Had the round had a tad more oomph, it would have been considered the first true assault rifle.

  • Michael A. Brodine MSgt Ret July 15, 2018, 8:57 pm

    Near 20 years in USAF used the M-1 & M-2 cabine which we replaced with M-16 in later years. Liked the little weapon so well I’ve owned 2 of my own. I have to tell the truth and a big drawback as I see it. If I was shooting against an enemy I’d never pick that.30 carbine amo, it’s not a manstoper by any my standard. It’s a great plinker but with my life in the balance give me a .223 M-16. I would like a M-1 in 7×39 cal., that would be great. PS today my personal carbine is Ruger mini-14.

  • GunOwner July 15, 2018, 3:45 pm

    The wall? Leave your economically ignorant politics out of it. Does Cabela’s build a wall in front of their store cause they only have a limited amount to sell?
    Stick to guns, bro.

    • srsquidizen July 16, 2018, 7:49 am

      They just jack the price up sky high and people still buy them. So do all the stores–not picking on Cabela’s. Since lots of Americans would happily pay high prices for these authentic pieces of history that aren’t just functioning replicas, they’d be lining up to buy them. Mr. President you are leaving money on the table. Not like you to do that. Bring back those guns!

    • DIRTSAILOR67 July 16, 2018, 7:57 am

      Lighten up, Francis.
      I am pretty sure it was meant to be a joke, not a political statement.

    • Joe Mannix July 16, 2018, 8:17 am

      Does Cabelas build a wall in front of their store? NO, you IDIOT, they have a locked door and a burglar alarm.

    • Patriot July 16, 2018, 8:51 am

      hey “Gun Owner”,,get a life you whinny anti Trump snowflake,guns are probably to dangerous for you to have anyways,so go back to the basket weaving sites,and leave the gun forums to real patriots,

    • Simmerjet July 17, 2018, 6:45 am

      Triggered?

    • Simmerjet July 17, 2018, 8:02 am

      Gun owner- Triggered?

  • Mike D July 14, 2018, 10:09 pm

    I’ve always liked the M1 Carbine, having spent many afternoons shooting my father’s Universal M1 growing up in the 1970’s. I was able to pick up a surplus CMP rifle a few years ago. It’s barrel is dated 6-44 the weapon shoots great 74 years later. No problems putting bullets on target out to 200 yards.

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