Introducing the New Ruger American Rimfire Long-Range Target Rifle

This new rimfire is for practicing long-range shooting on a budget. (Photo: Ruger)

Buried in a flurry of new releases from Ruger this year is a new rimfire rifle for longer-range shooting. The new Ruger American Rimfire Long-Range Target rifle is built for honing long-range shooting skills on a micro scale.

The Long-Range Target rifle is chambered for .22 Long Rifle and is built like a bench rest shooter only smaller. Weighing in at 8 pounds unloaded without any optics recoil will be a non-issue for this rimfire rifle, even for small and young shooters.

The Long-Range Target is a two-tone rifle with a black barrel and action and a brown stock with black highlights and speckles. The stock is fully adjustable with an adjustable cheek riser and buttstock spacers to set the length of pull.

The stock is modular with interchangeable buttpads, quick-detach sling swivel sockets and M-Lok slots along the 6-o’clock flat of the forend.

It carries and handles like a lightweight bench rifle with its fully adjustable modular stock and vertical target pistol grip. (Photo: Ruger)

It is of course based on Ruger’s immensely successful Ruger American Rimfire bolt-action rifle which accepts standard and many aftermarket 10/22 magazines. The barrel is free-floating as the action uses their Power Bedding system for repeatable accuracy.

The rifle comes with a 22-inch long threaded bull barrel with a .860-inch barrel profile. It has 1/2-28 threads for the most popular muzzle devices and suppressors. With the extra-long barrel and manual action the Long-Range Target will make a fantastic suppressor host.

It comes with a knurled thread protector included along with one 10-round BX-1 flush-fitting magazine and Ruger’s Marksman Adjustable match trigger. The trigger is adjustable between 3 and 5 pounds of pull.

The rifle is optics-ready, intended for use with a scope and not iron sights. It does have an aluminum Picatinny scope rail factory installed.

See Also: Ruger Custom Shop: Super GP100 in 9mm, Koenig 1911s in .45ACP – SHOT Show 2020

And while this is intended for serious work it’s also priced to be competitive. The Long-Range Target comes with a $599 suggested retail price, which means real-world pricing starting around $500 or so in stores and online.

Granted that doesn’t include the optic and possibly a sling or ammo but that is a very attractive price for anyone looking for a specialized .22 that’s good to go almost right out of the box.

If you were thinking about getting a rimfire rifle to practice your long-range shooting skills on a budget, this new Ruger American Rimfire may be too hard to pass up. For more visit the Ruger website.

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About the author: Max Slowik is a writer with over a dozen years of experience and is a lifelong shooter. He has unwavering support for the Second Amendment and the human right to self-defense. His ambition is to follow Thomas Paine, as a journalist by profession and a propagandist by inclination.

{ 3 comments… add one }
  • Scotty Gunn February 15, 2020, 3:08 pm

    It looks interesting, but personally I think it is over priced for what it is. Mid threes would be more appropriate.

  • Will Drider February 14, 2020, 2:35 pm

    Sounds interesting. We need a few range reports on how it performs with Match and bulk ammo. “Long Range” for a rimfire is not universally defined. Most rim fire rifles are accuracy tested at at ranges well below 100 yards. Any review not done under less than optimim conditions or include excuses like “with my old eyes” isn’t worth printing because this gun is about Long Range Target Shooting. I notice the absence of any Ruger claim for accuracy?

    • Bruce Flemings February 15, 2020, 11:05 am

      I was lucky enough to land one before SHOT exposure. I’ve only had it out once so far and it was grouping about 2″ at 100 with cheaper standard velocity match ammo. Like you, I’m bending my head around the new benchmarks for 22LR accuracy at 100 yards. I’m also curious about the accuracy “penalty” allowed for a $400 rifle like this one vs. a $4000+ rifle.

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