Factor LED Flashlights — Review

From left to right, the Cossatot XL, the Cossatot 1000, the Mizpah 300.

From left to right, the Cossatot XL, the Cossatot 1000, the Mizpah 300.

I’m not a flashlight guy per se. Unlike some of our writers at GunsAmerica, I don’t geek out over them. To me, they’re a tool that serves a simple purpose: providing illumination in the dark. That’s it. I don’t consider them to be a backup self-defense implement or a distress signal device or a tactical toy or anything but a source of light. I’m also not very picky about flashlights. I take a sorta no-nonsense, one-size-fits-all approach. If I hit a button, and flashlight lights up, I’m happy.

So this is coming from an unbiased perspective. I don’t have any brand loyalties clouding my judgment.

SEE ALSO: GunsAmerica Giveaway: Factor Flashlights

Factor Equipment sent me three flashlights to look at. The Cossatot 1000, the Cossatot 1000XL and the Mizpah 300. Right off the bat I’ll say that I was impressed with these flashlights. Again, I’m may not be a diehard flashlight guy, but I know a quality product when I use one.

Mizpah 300

The Mizpah 300.

The Mizpah 300.

Specs:

  • Performance: Maximum output of 300 lumens. Maximum runtime of 25 hours. Four modes of output, plus Strobe
  • Size: Length: 5.73” Head: 0.75” Diameter: 0.75”
  • Weight: 1.6 oz. (46.3g) excluding batteries
  • Battery: Two AA batteries (alkaline or Ni-MH)
  • Includes: Mizpah 300 flashlight, two AA batteries, user manual, coated steel pocket clip, two spare o-rings, and replacement rubber tail cap
  • PRICE: $36.95

Features:

  • Utilizes high performance CREE XP-G2 LED with a life of 50,000 hours
  • Glass Lens with double-sided anti-reflective coating
  • Body is corrosion resistant, military-grade, CNC machined, aircraft-quality Type III hard anodized aluminum alloy
  • Removable coated steel pocket clip
  • Waterproof to IPX-8 standard, 2 meters for 30 minutes
  • Rubber tail switch operation; turns light on/off and switches modes
  • Recall memory function allows the light to turn on in the last mode used
  • Digitally regulated output maintains constant brightness

The Mizpah 300 was my favorite flashlight of the bunch. It fit my m.o. Small, light, portable (great for pocket carry), versatile and inexpensive. At around $40, you can get a solid EDC flashlight that delivers on all fronts.

There are five different modes. Low (27 lumens), medium (125 lumens), high (181 lumens), blast (300 lumens) and strobe (see chart for details). That alone is useful. I never really thought about the need to regulate the brightness of my flashlight. The binary mindset of two modes: off and on (though “off” technically isn’t a mode) was enough for me.

Mizpah 300 Lumens scale.

But as I began to play around with these flashlights and use them around the house, I learned that having different settings makes a difference. For example, when my AT&T cable and internet went out (like it does so often, I hate AT&T!), I used the Mizpah 300 to illuminate the bottom of my closet where the modem, router, and cable cords reside. What I found was that the high setting was too bright, as it caused a lot of the light to reflect off the metal box and back at me. So, I turned it down to the medium setting and all was well. I had the perfect amount of light for the task at hand. With my old flashlight, I would have had to probably angle it away from the box so that the light didn’t reflect back into my eyes, temporarily blinding me.

The nice thing about the clip is that it is both removable and movable around the light.

The nice thing about the coated steel clip is that it is both removable and movable around the light.  It rotates to where you want it.

The rubber tailswitch. Easy to push!

The rubber tail switch. Easy to find and easy to push.

The Mizpah 300 is extremely user intuitive. I didn’t read the instructions at first, on purpose, to see if I could figure out how to use it. It was easy. No instructions necessary. A full push of the tail switch turns it on. A half push of the tail switch changes the modes. Another full push of the tail switch turns it off. Simple.

The only drawback I found with the Mizpah is that unlike its big brothers, it doesn’t have a rechargeable battery. I like that about the Cossatots. That said, you’re not going to break the bank buying AA batteries and they’re small enough that you can keep a pack or two in your EDC bag or pack.

Cossatot 1000

The Cosatot 1010

The Cossatot 1000.  An excellent option for adventurers, hunters, sportsmen.

Specs:

  • Performance: Maximum output of 1000 lumens. Maximum runtime of 100 hours. Four modes plus Strobe, SOS and Rescue Beacon.
  • Size: Length: 5.32” Head: 1.1” Diameter: 1”
  • Weight: 3.4 oz. (97.2g) excluding batteries
  • Battery: One 18650 Rechargeable Li-ion battery (included)
  • Includes: Cossatot 1000 flashlight, 18650 Li-ion rechargeable battery, USB charging cable, holster, user manual, coated steel pocket clip, two spare o-rings, and replacement rubber tail cap
  • PRICE: $79.95

Features:

  • USB Rechargeable
  • Utilizes high performance CREE XP-L LED with a life of 50,000 hours
  • Glass lens with double-sided anti-reflective coating
  • Body is corrosion resistant, military-grade, CNC machined, aircraft-quality Type III hard anodized aluminum alloy
  • Removable coated steel pocket clip
  • Waterproof to IPX-8 standard, 2 meters for 30 minutes
  • Dual switch operation; tactical tail switch provides momentary activation and turns light on/off; side switch changes modes
  • Recall memory function allows the light to turn on in the last mode used
  • Digitally regulated output maintains constant brightness

The Cossatot 1000 (cool name, right? I should note that like the Mizpah, it’s named after a river; though, the Mizpah is a river in Montana whereas the Cossatot is a river in Arkansas) is a mid-sized flashlight that’s just a little too big for the front pocket, but not too heavy to wear on your belt. Thankfully, it comes with a nice nylon holster that easily attaches to your belt.

The side switch.

The side switch.  This is where you adjust the different modes.

The rubber flap to the rechargeable USB port.

The rubber flap or dust cover to the rechargeable USB port.

Operating the Cossatot 1000 is different than the Mizpah. There is a separate button towards the front of the flashlight, the “side switch,” that changes the modes. I think they opted for a two button system instead of just the one button system because of all the various modes that this baby has: Low, Medium, High, Blast, SOS, Strobe and Beacon. Now that’s versatility!

Of all the flashlights, I think this one would be the best for backpacking or camping or hunting.  It provides plenty of light for a variety of situations: examining tracks on a game trail in the pre-dawn hours of an autumn hunt, searching for your tent poles in tall grass after the sun has set, providing a periodic burst of light during a nighttime hike.  Whatever the mission is, the Cossatot 1000 seems equipped to deal with it.

Cossatot1000

The only real drawback I see with the Cossatot 1000 is the dust cover or little flap for the rechargeable USB port. It’s a pain to get it to sit flush in its hole, and if you don’t, it opens rather easily. And, I guess if I’m being really picky, in a pinch, you may confuse the flap with the side switch because they’re made out of the same rubber-like material. Now, this isn’t a huge deal and in no way affects the performance of the light, but I thought I’d make note of it.

Cossatot 1000XL

The Cossatot XL. The big dog of the bunch. This one is the choice for LEOs and those with other tactical needs.

The Cossatot XL. The big dog of the bunch. This one is the choice for LEOs and those with other tactical needs.

Specs:

  • Performance: Maximum output of 1000 lumens. Maximum runtime of 130 hours. Four modes plus Strobe.
  • Size: Length: 5.93” Head: 1.34” Diameter: 1”
  • Weight: 4.7 oz. (134g) excluding batteries
  • Battery: One 18650 Rechargeable Li-ion battery (included)
  • Includes: Cossatot 1000 XL flashlight, 18650 Li-Ion rechargeable battery, USB charging cable, holster, user manual, coated steel pocket clip, two spare o-rings, and replacement rubber tail cap
  • PRICE: $84.95

Features:

  • Utilizes high performance CREE XP-L LED with a life of 50,000 hours
  • Glass Lens with double-sided anti-reflective coating
  • Body is corrosion resistant, military-grade, CNC machined, aircraft-quality Type III hard anodized aluminum alloy
  • Removable coated steel pocket clip
  • Waterproof to IPX-8 standard, 2 meters for 30 minutes
  • Tactical rear switch operation provides momentary activation, on/off, and mode switch capabilities in single tail switch
  • Flashlight’s blast operation ensures that light turns on highest 1000 mode output every start to support tactical operations
  • Digitally regulated output maintains constant brightness

The Cossatot 100XL is the big dog of the bunch. Unlike the 1000, it doesn’t have that extra mode button. Everything is controlled by the tail switch.  From my experience, I actually preferred the two-button system to the one button system.  Using just the tail switch, with the half-button pushes to adjust the through the modes, was a bit more difficult to use than the separate side switch.  More on that in a moment.

Like the Cossatot 1000, it’s a mid-sized light that actually fits in the same exact sheath. It’s also rechargeable.

Cossatot1000XL

The XL is designed for tactical and law enforcement applications. At the front, there is a removable strike plate over the light. I suspect if you needed to, the strike plate could be used to, you guessed it, strike an assailant.  I didn’t actually try this out on anyone or anything, but from the look and feel of it, I bet it would hurt.  It seems to packs quite a punch.

You can see how the XL fits into the sheath.

You can see how the XL fits into the holster.

The XL’s memory setting always reverts back to blast mode, which is key for LEOs who want to surprise and maybe visually impair a suspect. From this vantage point, the single tail switch makes sense.  You don’t want to have to find a side switch during an encounter to return the light back to blast mode.

As with the Cossatot 1000, the XL also has the same dust cover issue.  Again, it’s not a big deal but it is something I noticed.

The front of the Cossatot 1000.

The front of the Cossatot 1000. No strike guard.

The front of the XL with the strike guard. It looks like it packs quite the punch. I know I wouldn't want to get hit with that.

The front of the XL with the strike guard. It looks like it packs quite the punch. I know I wouldn’t want to get hit with that.

Factor Offer

Since their new on the scene, Factor is offering a cool special. It’s a 30-day trial period. As they say, “Buy it. Try it. Use it. Abuse it.” And, “If you are not happy with your purchase, send it back to us for a full credit of your purchase good toward any other Factor Product.”

It’s a tempting offer. If you’re not happy with what you bought, you can get something else for around the same price.

You can see the blue light indicator that the flashlight needs to be charged.

You can see the blue light indicator that the flashlight needs to be charged.

The button securely fastens the flashlight holster around your belt.

The button securely fastens the flashlight holster around your belt.

I should note that it’s not a money-back offer. Meaning, once you buy it and try it, there’s no getting your money back. You can get another product, but not a refund. This might rub some of you the wrong way. And I understand. Yet, I also recognize that Factor is a burgeoning company, and money is undoubtedly tight right now. So, it only makes sense that they are more circumspect with their trial offer.

The Company also has an “oath” to promise you “satisfaction on all of its products” and a “Limited Lifetime Warranty on all of its products against defects in materials or workmanship.”

All three for a side by side comparison.

All three for a side by side comparison.

Conclusion

Depending on what you need a flashlight for —  EDC, backpacking/camping/hunting, tactical/LEO — you have several great options with Factor.  These flashlights are well designed, well built and easy to use.  As mentioned, they’re also affordable.  So, if you’re intrigued by what you see don’t be afraid to pick one up and give it a whirl. And if you do, or if you have experience with these flashlights, please tell us about it in the comment section below.

Nice.

A nice flashlight.  Make sure you enter to win one in our giveaway!

{ 5 comments… add one }
  • Michael Glaros May 27, 2016, 7:41 am

    Good review

  • Tommy May 16, 2016, 3:28 pm

    I didn’t see a price on the 100XL, or did I just miss it?
    I only but LED flashlights nowadays. I have discovered that the light delivered is
    brighter and the batteries last longer. I’d love to own any of these Factor lights.
    Thanks for the good review.

  • Franke May 16, 2016, 12:03 pm

    I really agree with the comment about the two button light. I have a number of lights, and really hate having to cycle through all of the modes “Just to turn it OFF”. Might just go buy one more to have that feature for my Carry Light.

  • Earl T. Saylor May 16, 2016, 9:56 am

    Great info site sure would like to win a flash light , I’m a light geek

  • bob king May 15, 2016, 11:50 pm

    love led flashlights

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