50 State Legal Pump AR from Troy

Send to Kindle
Buy Now on GunsAmerica
The Troy Sporting Rifle is handsome. It looks like an AR-15, but the more you get to know it the less similar they seem.

The Troy Sporting Rifle is handsome. It looks like an AR-15, but the more you get to know it the less similar they seem.

If you are one of the unlucky few gun enthusiasts who lives in a state with draconian and unconstitutional firearms laws, odds are you may well be aware of the Troy Sporting Rifle, or Pump Action Rifle (PAR). Troy, a company that knows its way around fighting black rifles, has answered the call for a fully functional MSR that delivers uncompromising performance and accuracy, and they’ve packaged it in a form that most of us know and respect. The PAR remains true to its AR-15 roots, and it is 50 state legal.

So what do you give up to stay within the bounds of the law? And what about the rest of us—how does the PAR stack up for those of us who can legally own AR-15s?

Before we get too far in, let’s clear up some confusion. Some early press and comments on this gun implied, mistakenly, that this was simply a pump action AR-15. PAR stands for pump action rifle–not pump AR-15. It is an honest mistake, I think, and one I caught myself making, at least causally. The Troy Sporting Rifle is not, despite the visual similarities, an AR-15. The Troy Sporting Rifle is clearly a branch on the AR family tree—but AR means ArmaLite  Rifle, and this, dear readers, is a Troy. Even if you were to use the relaxed nomenclature associated with the abbreviation AR, (like automatic rifle, or–worse–assault rifle,) you’d still be off.  This is a pump gun meant for sporting purposes. The upper and lower of the PAR are not interchangeable with those of the AR-15; ergo, this is not an AR. This is, however, a truly fine example of a modern sporting rifle. And it will be instantly familiar to those of you who know your way around black semi-automatic modular “assault” rifles built in the style of ArmaLite and hundreds of others.

Sorry. Where was I? Oh yes–this is a Troy. Troy Defense, the firearms manufacturing branch of Troy Industries, makes solid guns, and great add-ons for ARs. From sights to slings to magazines to complete rifles, Troy has industry leading options. The brand is firmly rooted in the duty and service minded gear, so the addition of a truly sporting rifle to their line up is a bit of a surprise.

Folded and locked.

Folded and locked.

But it shouldn’t be. There are rifles meant for fighting and rifles that become part of the fight. The PAR is a rifle that wins. Follow me here. I’m going down a philosophical rabbit hole. The Troy Sporting Rifle is part of a much larger political battle—the fight over what is and what isn’t legal in New York, and in several other states. New York has concocted some unconstitutional laws, and continues to force the bullshit political whimsy of well-armed hypocrats onto law-abiding citizens.

Troy could have easily said “To Hell with New York.” Instead, they produced a viable option. The Troy PAR is an AR styled rifle that has been specially designed to be legal in all 50 states. No matter what laws the reactionary idiots pass, this rifle (at least as of the writing of this review) remains legal. And—here’s the really good news for the victims of these laws—the PAR is truly capable.

I keep imagining a metaphorical poker game where Steve Troy and Governor Cuomo are making bets. “I see your ridiculous attempt to thwart Second Amendment rights,” Troy says, “and I raise you one perfectly legal Troy Sporting Rifle.”

Oh, how I wish it were that easy.

Here you can see just how different the inside of the lower is.

Here you can see just how different the inside of the lower is.

So it is kind of like an AR…

As the Troy Sporting Rifle doesn’t chamber rounds automatically, or cycle its action with the gas of recently fired rounds, it isn’t a semi-automatic rifle. There is no gas system. There is no buffer tube. In order to chamber a round, you have to pump. The operation of the slide is lighter than that of a 12 gauge pump, but can be run with just as much emphasis. What looks like a traditional AR upper and lower is, upon closer examination, not. While much of the gun is based on AR modularity, the upper and lower (which separate like a traditional AR) are dedicated to this very platform. With no buffer tube on the lower, there’s no way these parts could be interchangeable.

Yes, it has many features that make the AR-15 versatile. The stock collapses (or can be fixed, where required). The muzzle device is pinned in place, and welded. It does have a pistol grip. There is a detachable magazine. And it shoots the .223. Yet all of these are moot points, where the law is concerned, because it isn’t a semi-auto. Rather than work around the gas system with a series of whacked out lowers or bullet buttons, Troy has done away with the AR’s most problematic feature. With no gas system to foul, the PAR is arguably more reliable. And the free-floated barrel allows for greater accuracy.

As I’d mentioned, some of the early comments I read implied you could drop this upper onto an existing lower. Not the case. The catch to release the slide is on the bottom of the trigger guard. It takes a minute to find it the first time. The PAR looks so much like an AR that I found myself looking for a bolt drop, or something in its place to release the slide. But once you know where it is, the release is easy to reach and to operate.

The controls work like those on most AR-15s.

The controls work like those on most AR-15s.

The magazine release is in the predictable position, and it functions just as it would on the AR-15. The PAR ships with a 10 round magazine. I hadn’t even considered the practical limitation, as 10 round mag is the same size and shape as a 30 round mag. I felt a bit foolish when I tried to load that 11th round. Then it dawned on me that this was part of the plot. As I live in a free state, I can use 30 round magazines as often as I’d like. But laws are laws, and I’d never suggest that you break them. A ten round magazine is included. Magazines with more realistic capacity work, too.

My favorite part of the PAR (besides its incendiary existence) is the stock. The stock on this is a thing of beauty. It is thin and boxy. A lever rotates a series of blocks inside the stock that lock the extendable stock in various positions. The whole stock breaks at the back of the receiver, and locks onto the front pin. It is ambidextrous and can be made to close on either the right or left side.

The rest of the controls are typically situated for the right-handed shooter. The good news is that the lower is built with modularity in mind. If you would want AR add-on style gizmos, they’ll fit. Did I mention Troy makes a lot of those gizmos?

Shooting the PAR

I ran the PAR with a variety of ammo brands and grain weights. I ran 55, 69, and 77s from Gorilla, 55 grain Monarch steel-cased, and 55 grain Hornady. The 1/7 twist did well with all of the weights, and I had no problems getting the steel cased bulk junk to chamber or extract.

I shot with Iron sights, and I used a couple of different scopes—a NightForce 1-4 and a Weaver Tactical 2-10 x 36. All work equally well—it simply depends on the distance you intend to shoot. For hog hunting or close work, the 1-4 offers speed and easy target acquisition. For longer ranges, more magnification means more precision.

Sighting in the 2-10 was easy enough. I like to sight in under controlled circumstances, and always use a shooting rest. The pump action is the only challenge, there. After each shot, you have to pick it up to work the slide effectively, so it takes more time.

This was the best of the groups from 100 yards. 69 grain Gorilla.

This was the best of the groups from 100 yards. 69 grain Gorilla.

Five shots form the shoulder at 100 yards with 55 grain Hornady. The PAR is as easy to hold on target as any AR-15.

Five shots form the shoulder at 100 yards with 55 grain Hornady. The PAR is as easy to hold on target as any AR-15 and the Nightforce 1-4 is easier to get on target than irons.

The 2-10 was good out to 300 yards, which is as far as I can shoot on the range here. Accuracy at that distance was reliable, once I found the right holdover. I was battling a bit of wind on the day of the long range testing, So I ran heavier loads. The 77 grain bullets held course better. I never did get dead on at 300–but that has much more to do with me than the capabilities of the PAR.

One minute of angle at 300 yards is 3 inches, which I think it is possible with the PAR. The trigger, which breaks at 7 pounds, makes MOA precision difficult. More on that in a minute.

At 100 yards I got what I’d expected. My best group at 100 came in at .42 inches. Even the Monarch did well. The PAR is a contender. The predictable accuracy I’m seeing puts it up there with the best .223s I’ve shot. I haven’t seen this level of precision from any AR-15 in this price range—and very few others. The PAR has an MSRP of $1,099. You would have to cross over into bolt action .223s to find anything that can compete—and then you’ve lost the AR-15 modularity and familiarity. If you do want an AR-15 that delivers like this, you may end up paying much more. But again–even though it looks like I’m comparing apples to apples (at least on the outside), I’m really not. This isn’t an AR, and it isn’t a bolt action, either.

One note on performance–without the gas system, the bullet should have a bit more zip—though the increase would be negligible. The 55 grain Gorilla ammo was breaking 3,000 FPS, while the 77 grain was coming in closer to 2,800.

The trigger breaks clean, but at 7 pounds.

The trigger breaks clean, but at 7 pounds.

But what about that trigger?

My guess is that the trigger will be the first, and maybe only piece shooters want to upgrade. When I look for problems with accuracy, the trigger is usually the most easily identifiable. The PAR has a heavy pull. 7 pounds. I’d like to see 3 pound trigger. As is, the trigger has no creep and no take up. When cocked, the trigger doesn’t move at all—until it breaks, crisp and certain. That part is admirable, but the seven pounds of force is heavy. Even with the rifle in a rest, well braced, the trigger pull will make a difference.

When shooting on the move, or even standing, I found the trigger pull beastly. It was easier for me to get accurate shots off when I tucked more finger into the trigger guard. I caught the trigger in the bend of my first knuckle, instead of on the pad, which is how I’ve been shooting AKs lately. Regardless–it works.

Any Problems with the PAR?

Failures to feed? None. Failures to extract? Not one. The only oddity we experienced in all of the rounds fired was an occasional double-feed from a short shuck when we awkwardly racked the slide over the shooting bench. Running the PAR from a bench rest isn’t graceful, as the pump itself rides in the Y of the rest, and when the trigger is pulled, the catch is released and the pump is free to move.

There is another interesting peculiarity that you may experience when you’re shooting. If you hold onto the pump while you shoot, it will drop when you pull the trigger. If you are hauling back on the forend to stabilize your shot, the slide will rock back the moment you fire. This isn’t a problem, just an odd feeling for those of us who aren’t used to our AR forends moving.

Shuck it like you mean it. Take the slide all the back and all the way forward like you would on any pump shotgun and I guarantee you won’t have a problem. In fact, it locks into place when all the way forward. The magazine seats just like it would in an AR, and that first round presents easily. It doesn’t take any real effort—but there’s a lockup at the end of the stroke, when the bolt is fully seated, at which point the slide locks in place.

The Troy irons are solid. They fold down, or lock up in place. They're not spring loaded, but very easy to stand up.

The Troy irons are solid. They fold down, or lock up in place. They’re not spring loaded, but very easy to stand up.

Why do you need a PAR?

Let’s consider this from a variety of angles. Law abiding “citizens” in some wretched places will find this an easy sell. Hunters who can hunt with .223 or 300 AAC will find the PAR a solid platform to work with. That alone is justification for its existence—if such justification was even needed.

I think the market is wider than that, though. This is a piece of history, really, and will certainly go down as a footnote in the larger political debate about firearm legislation. As such, there will be some collector value somewhere well down the line. I’d own one as a show of solidarity, even if it didn’t shoot as accurately as this one does.

Which brings us to the real market. Accuracy sells guns. This guns shoots sub-MOA groups. That’s enough. There will will always be a market for a rifle that shoots sub-MOA (especially when that rifle sells for $1000 or less).

That the PAR is an AR simulacrum, we can all agree. Most of us have a working familiarity with the AR-15. We know where the safety is. We’ve changed countless magazines. Having any gun with which we are that familiar makes sense—which is why there are so many AR like guns in other calibers. .300, 7.62×39, .308, .30-06, 12 gauge… this one just happens to be a return to the most familiar .223. Instead of creating a new rifle by changing up the caliber, Troy simply changed up the operating system.

The fourth point I’d make may be the least obvious. The Troy Sporting Rifle is a great gun in its own right. The PAR should be considered as a front-runner in a new class of guns. As a modern sporting rifle, this gun rocks. The pump action is nothing new, but it is fast. The familiarity of the platform means there’s almost no learning curve, and the gun shoots straight, consistently. We’d be raving about this gun, regardless–and that’s the true test.

Don’t forget about the political fight–it is still worth fighting–but don’t dismiss the PAR as just another pawn in that game, either.

Sighting in with the 77 grain Gorilla.

Sighting in with the 77 grain Gorilla. I fired one magazine, so there are six shots in the top center hole.

Five shots at 200 yards. My shots were high, but not a bad group for me. 77 grain Gorilla.

Five shots at 200 yards. My shots were high, but not a bad group for me. 77 grain Gorilla. Either two went in one hole or I sailed one so far off that it missed the paper.

Five shots at 100 with Monarch steel-cased 55 grain.

Five shots at 100 with Monarch steel-cased 55 grain.

This is the target from 300 yards. I'd aimed for the orange dot. It took me a few shots to find the hold over.

This is the target from 300 yards. I’d aimed for the orange dot. It took me a few shots to find the hold over.

 

The muzzle device has two baffles.

The muzzle device has two baffles.

Like the barrel says, .223 with a 1/7 twist.

Like the barrel says, .223 with a 1/7 twist.

The stock is solid, and heavier than most plastic stocks, but the length of the barrel still puts the balance point right at the front edge of the mag well.

The stock is solid, and heavier than most plastic stocks, but the length of the barrel still puts the balance point right at the front edge of the mag well.

The PAR breaks open like an AR, but the halves are not interchangeable.

The PAR breaks open like an AR, but the halves are not interchangeable.

The adjustable stock is truly a work of art. Very thin and incredibly stout.

The adjustable stock is truly a work of art. Very thin and incredibly stout.

The angle of the end of the upper is different than that on a typical AR-15

The angle of the end of the upper is different than that on a typical AR-15

The PAR has several attachment points for quick detach sling mounts.

The PAR has several attachment points for quick detach sling mounts.

The forend is milled from aluminum and ribbed for even more texture. You can hold the PAR thumb over bore, on the slide, or behind it.

The forend is milled from aluminum and ribbed for even more texture. You can hold the PAR thumb over bore, on the slide, or behind it.

The Troy PAR is thin. It feels thinner than an AR, but that may be because the PAR lacks a forward assist and the width of the buffer tube.

The Troy PAR is thin. It feels thinner than an AR, but that may be because the PAR lacks a forward assist and the width of the buffer tube.

Push this lever and the stock slides in and out.

Push this lever and the stock slides in and out.

These blocks rotate inside the stock to allow for extension and compaction.

These blocks rotate inside the stock to allow for extension and compaction.

Here they are rotated.

Here they are rotated.

The stock can be switched to fold left or right, and it secures on the front pin that holds the upper and lower together.

The stock can be switched to fold left or right, and it secures on the front pin that holds the upper and lower together.

The latch that holds the stock open is fat and secure.

The latch that holds the stock open is fat and secure.

This side tells you more. I'd like to see a shorter 10 round mag, one that looks less like a 30 round mag--if only to make bench rest shooting easier.

I’d like to see a shorter 10 round mag, one that looks less like a 30 round mag–if only to make bench rest shooting easier.

kk

The PAR has a fluted chamber that will leave racing stripes on your brass.

Because this isn't a semi-auto, it can have a pistol grip.

Because this isn’t a semi-auto, it can have a pistol grip.

Like most ARs, the mag well is beveled slightly. Mag changes happen as quickly as the would on an AR.

Like most ARs, the mag well is beveled slightly. Mag changes happen as quickly as the would on an AR.

The forend is robust, and ideally suited for conversion into a pump action.

The forend is robust, and ideally suited for conversion into a pump action.

This strange profile of the front pin clicks into the stock when it is folded.

This strange profile of the front pin clicks into the stock when it is folded.

The gun comes well oiled, and ships in a well built cardboard carton--which is why the gun looks a bit dusty in some angles.

The gun comes well oiled, and ships in a well built cardboard carton–which is why the gun looks a bit dusty in some angles.

Troy.

Troy.

As this is a sporting rifle, the trigger guard has ample room for winter gloves.

As this is a sporting rifle, the trigger guard has ample room for winter gloves.

The Gorilla ammo did very well from the gun.

The Gorilla ammo did very well from the gun.

Troy's magazines have a distinct scaled texture that is easy to grip.

Troy’s magazines have a distinct scaled texture that is easy to grip.

This button releases the slide.

This button releases the slide.

The rear sight folds neatly below a scope, and is there if you need it.

The rear sight folds neatly below a scope, and is there if you need it.

The pump could easily be mistaken for a typical Troy AR forend.

The pump could easily be mistaken for a typical Troy AR forend.

I want a version of this stock to be made for traditional AR-15s. Or better yet, for an AK.

I want a version of this stock to be made for traditional AR-15s. Or better yet, for an AK.

With the Weaver 2-10, the longer ranges open up.

With the Weaver 2-10, the longer ranges open up.

 

{ 79 comments… add one }
  • Hannes Hirschfänger February 16, 2017, 7:44 am

    Thanks for this amazing article and the detailed photos that I thoroughly enjoyed.
    I’m an owner of this beauty for only two weeks now and already had so much fun at the shooting range. I also love all the possibilites this rifle holds thanks to the similarities with the AR15 platform.
    Now your article was of course written from a US point of view, but as a resident of Austria, where nationwide gun laws are almost as restrictive as in CA, IL, NY, and NJ, I’d like to add that the Troy PAR really comes in as a savior over here. I believe this will turn into a real export hit on foreign markets, since the Troy PAR not only complies with most gun laws in the world, but can be considered an upgrade for rifle owners worldwide who are forced to rely on non-automatic weapons. In times when the sovereignty and freedom of Europe is threatened by hordes of illegal immigrants, drug dealers and rapists, a versatile weapon such as the Troy PAR is more than welcome!

  • MikeN August 22, 2016, 7:36 am

    There was mention in the review of the heavy trigger. But no solutions suggested. Aside from stoning the stock trigger/sear, is there an aftermarket solution? Is the fire control group standard such that aftermarket ar-15 options can be used?
    Thanks.

  • REM1875 August 6, 2016, 4:35 pm

    Here is an odd reason to get one- I didn’t see it listed but……..
    I like pump action rifles. I have em in 32-20, 7.62×39, 30 Rem, 35 Rem, 38-40 and 44-40 and all sorts of stuff in between and am looking at a pump 30-30 for my birthday.
    I like pump action rifles. Nothing brings one alive like wracking that action and squeezing one off.

    Hat tip? -like bolt and lever actions, leave the rifle in the shoulder and cock from there. Do not do a TV version of pulling it down working the action and putting it back in the shoulder. I realize some are too hard and you have to do this with them but practice with the smoothest actions you have and work up, you will be surprised. Site picture acquisition will be much quicker. And the second shot is almost instantaneous.

    Oh and I like pump actions……….. so I been eying the troy rifle for awhile. Good article!

  • Doug July 15, 2016, 1:47 am

    Unlucky to live in California, the banner champion state? If we can get this, I think we are Lucky! This is better than an AR15. I want one. Forget AR’s.

  • Bob May 18, 2015, 10:30 am

    Hello people from Troy Industry, I leave in NY and I will love to have somthing similarly in 7.62×39 or in Tokarev round,do you thing it is posible? let me know

  • Jason May 14, 2015, 6:19 pm

    Any hope for a 300blk version in the future. I would find a use for a 300blk version with a threaded barrel.

  • wickedpedia April 19, 2015, 10:37 am

    I picked up this rifle as a novelty item in New York.

    First thing I have to clear up is that the models currently shipping DO NOT have the muzzle break pinned/welded. The barrel is threaded and the muzzle is simply screwed on. You can easily unscrew it and add anything you want that is legal in your state.

    The quality and features are really amazing for the price. The battle sight’s work very well and the rear is easily adjustable. As seen in most reviews of the rifle the folding adjustable stock is a real standout bespoke item. It doesn’t just fold up, it also locks in place folded and shoots without limiting any options when in the right hand configuration. Shooting it from the hip or in front of your stomach is very comfortable and a very unique experience. Lots of fun. If there is one thing I would like to see Troy include is their modular front VGrip. When set in the short position this rifle’s visual features will make liberals soil their underwear. My next suggestion would be to ditch the blocked 30 round magazine and use a blocked 20 round magazine instead. It just allows the rifle to be setup on a bench easier without getting in the way. I picked up 2 Pmag blocked 20’s. They install and drop out with absolute ease. Fitment is perfect.

    Regarding performance I put 200 round through it with zero issue. The tolerances are very tight upon initial use. And you have to be sure not to short stroke the pump. After about 50 rounds everything ticked along perfectly. If you do not choose to add a front VGrip I suggest you try some softer rail guards or some grip tape over the stock ones. With a bear hand the pump just has a very machined sharp feel to it. Softer plastic rail guards on the pump would be nice. With that said none of these gripes effect performance.

    If you guys have any questions post away and i’ll do my best to put the rifle through its paces.

  • ej harb November 15, 2014, 4:57 am

    Not a fan of 223/556 but id love one in 308 with 20-22″ barrel. Pumps are almost as fast as semis with training

  • Josh November 12, 2014, 12:08 pm

    The NY bans you metioned only appliy to semi-auto. This rifle is not semi-auto so its legal.

  • steve November 11, 2014, 6:16 pm

    Not sure how this gun can be legal in 50 states. Its certainly not legal in New York. Flash hider, pistol grip, removable mag, folding stock. SAFE ACT says no, no!

    • TROY November 12, 2014, 9:24 pm

      NY State Legal. We’re POSITIVE.

      • Al November 13, 2014, 7:01 pm

        Just not for NYC (Manhattan or any of the five boroughs). There’s a 5 round limit to magazine, any action.

        • Thomas November 14, 2014, 4:41 am

          Well it takes the standard mag so get a 10 round mag and put in a 5 round limiter in it or just a 5 round mag. I have several because so many states have the 5 round max for hunting.

        • Thomas November 14, 2014, 4:43 am

          Well it takes the standard mag so get a 10 round mag and put in a 5 round limiter in it or just a 5 round mag. I have several because so many states have the 5 round max for hunting.

    • zach February 19, 2016, 12:33 pm

      because it’s not a semi auto it’s a pump the ban only applies to semi autos

    • zach February 19, 2016, 12:33 pm

      because it’s not a semi auto it’s a pump the ban only applies to semi autos

  • A.E. Mashboine November 10, 2014, 10:18 pm

    Your review reveals but dismisses a glaring design problem. A pump action that unlocks when the hammer falls can cause injury or death in the event of a hang-fire. With the action unlocked, a delay in ignition of the propellant can cause the unsupported cartridge case to rupture, sending brass fragments and high pressure hot gas into the action, the shooter, and bystanders. Hang-fires seldom happen, but one is all it takes.

  • Dave Walker November 10, 2014, 9:21 pm

    If you don’t like it, don’t buy it. Bugs was right, “What a bunch of maroons.”

  • jerry kasha November 10, 2014, 4:52 pm

    I’ll take my 750 Remington any day of the week !

  • paul November 10, 2014, 1:35 pm

    Would not be legal in ct. pistol grip, flash hider and folding stock a no no. Also overall length with stock folded illegal!

    • Al November 10, 2014, 2:40 pm

      It would also have been just the ticket for Dr.Petit (in Connecticut) when two ex-convicts carjacked his wife and
      daughters, broke his head with a bat, then raped and slaughtered them during a home invasion – only to have their
      death sentences commuted to life in prison. Unfortunately here in the Northeast, politicians are put in office by a
      welfare gravy train for the biggest taxpayer handouts; and they care nothing about the Bill of Rights. That’s the sad
      reality of city life and life in the Northeast.

    • TROY November 12, 2014, 9:23 pm

      CT legal – because of the pump action. All of those requirements are tied to semi-auto.

  • Mike November 10, 2014, 12:44 pm

    This is an awesome market response to anti gun liberals. Instead of jumping on the ” my rights band wagon” many of the posters on here need to understand that folks in banned states HAVE NO ALTERNATIVE !!! please give them and me a break. We must all support each other even in banned states. Gun owners are gun owners no matter the action type. we are all trying to exercise our 2nd amendment rights. I take umbrage at the “junk” response and the uninformed nature of the comment. Please get an education of the problem before posting ignorant comments on situations you obviously DO NOT UNDERSTAND. Try living in a banned state before you call junk on a market attempt to provide an alternative to NO GUN AT ALL. I HATE ASSHOLES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • jtheripper November 14, 2014, 4:31 am

      Exactly what I wanted to say to that fool. Thank you Mike.

  • Kalashnikov Dude November 10, 2014, 12:00 pm

    Living in Arizona, I wouldn’t have a specific need for one of these. But the rifle looks like it might be interesting to shoot and the .308 version sounds very promising. I have cabinets filled with bolt actions, AR’s and AK’s, pump actions shot guns, semi auto shotguns and, even a few of those old Marlin bolt action shotguns. But nothing quite like this. I’m a gun enthusiast, all kinds. What manufacturers do to comply with laws I don’t agree with, they don’t agree with, has made for a wide and varied selection of firearms to enjoy as far as I’m concerned. That said Illegal laws are illegal. Our 2nd Amendment is a simple concept to grasp. The key being: ” the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed”. There are no more clear words in the English language. I have no time for the muddled, confusing lawyers speak that has found ways to justify all manner of restrictions that any sane person would otherwise define as “infringements”. How have folks managed to write entire books on the matter? Volumes of revised statutes, in every state? And arguments, debates, gnashing of teeth forevermore. Shall not be infringed. Accept anything less and you’ve been scammed. I tell people if they want to have an honest discussion about gun laws in America that is where it needs to start. Then we can see how far this country has gotten away from that simple mandate already. To start the conversation with the current state of things, “gun show loopholes”, background checks, entire “classes” of firearms denied to citizens, is illogical and disingenuous. Don’t even get me started on the demonizing of barrel threads and bayonet lugs. If there’s an anti gunner capable of such a discussion, I have not met him.

  • Gary November 10, 2014, 11:58 am

    In commifornia we also have to comply with a state law mandating 30″ minimum length on centerfires with stock closed. I dont think this gun will meet that so beware unless a fixed stock becomes available. I would love it as a 308 as some states do not allow semis for hunting.

    • TROY November 12, 2014, 9:21 pm

      Perfectly legal for California. CA and MI are the reason for the pinned and welded muzzle device as the length must be measured from the stock folded, without regard to its intent (which is, obviously, unfolded). 308 is coming but with a BattleAx stock and muzzle device options that probably will take it off of the CA roster for compliance.

  • Gordon Adams November 10, 2014, 11:56 am

    I would think our friends in Canada might enjoy this rifle as they to have laws restricting the AR-15 & variants. This firearm is not an AR-15 so might get around their laws & restrictions, I will be interesting to hear from someone up there that would know if that is the case.

    • Tim L. October 10, 2015, 10:46 pm

      Well. I just had a quick look on http://www.canadiangunnutz.com/ in case of new developments. We are still waiting… and waiting for the decision re: classification of this firearm, namely Non-Restricted (most long guns), Restricted (some long guns and most hand guns) or Prohibited. It really should be NR and they sure seem to be dragging their political butts on this one. For us Canadians, for any practical real-world use and availability a Non-Restricted gun is the only useable, legal option as Restricted guns (handguns and most AR-types) really are so heavily restricted here.
      As a pump shotgun devotee I’m waiting eagerly too and have high hopes it’ll be classed NR.

  • TC November 10, 2014, 11:53 am

    How quickly can you stay on point with follow-up shots? Being a pump must really limit it’s speed by miles!

    • Mark N. November 12, 2014, 1:35 am

      Depends on your perspective. A Colt Lightning will outshoot any lever action rifle any day when it comes to speed. And I’ve seen more than a couple of shotgun trick shooters put down a serious number of rounds in short order. Will a semiauto be faster? Yes, of course–but this is designed as a “sporting rifle” (or hunting rifle if you prefer) where a high rate of (suppressive) fire is not the object.

  • 4x4moses November 10, 2014, 11:36 am

    I live south of the Mason-Dixon line, where it is legal to own virtually any kind of firearm. Still, I’d like to give one of these MSRs a workout just to see if it lives up to the hype. Troy makes top quality products, so there’s no reason to suspect this rifle will be anything less than top-notch. As for those who say “Don’t buy it because it’s designed to appease the liberal hoplophobes…” GET A CLUE! Some folks can’t/won’t leave their state, even when the constitution-perverting politicians limit their firearms options. For folks who live in those areas, this rifle is a viable option. The haters are no less guilty of attempting to limit firearms accessibility, than the liberal politicians who would ban everything but muzzle-loaders!

  • Bill November 10, 2014, 10:46 am

    Instead of “FOLDING BATTLE SIGHT” it should just say “FOLDING SIGHT”. Some bonehead politician will try to outlaw this platform as an assault weapon because it says “BATTLE”. Don’t give them an inch.

  • criag November 10, 2014, 10:33 am

    Living in Maryland I think it a cool product. Thanks for the article’s good reading.

    • Hogan's hero November 10, 2014, 5:37 pm

      We can still get normal hbar rifles. Or get a lower txed as an other and do a pistol build, no hql necessary 🙂

  • Dottie November 10, 2014, 10:17 am

    I LIVE ALONE AND WOULD LOVE SOMEONE TO COME INTO
    MY HOUSE WITHOUT WARNING. I JUST HAD SOMEONE
    STEAL A MOTOR FROM MY BOAT (I LIVE ON THE WATER)
    NO WARNING SHOT BULLETS ARE TOO EXPENSIVE.

  • Matthew November 10, 2014, 10:00 am

    You can keep it. I refuse to comply with illegal laws. I will not support a product that tries to comply with illegal laws.

    • steve A. November 10, 2014, 10:40 am

      then why do you own any guns at all? if there are laws against newly manufactured fully automatic weapons, so why do you buy semi auto versions of those guns? why do you agree to the background check when you go to buy a gun? it must be nice to live in a state where you have less restrictive gun laws, but not everyone does. if someone in one of those states wants an AR, but doesn’t want to break the law, what gun do you recommend they buy? or are you saying they should buy one illegally on the street? or not buy any guns at all?

      • jtheripper November 12, 2014, 2:52 am

        Excellent point. This rifle is a great opportunity to educate some ignorant people & show how stupid the gun grabbing laws are & get them to admit that they are just reacting to how scary the rifle looks. & expose the the REAL agenda, which is keeping anywhere with a high concentration of black & brown people disarmed. Of course they would like to disarm everyone, but the main focus is on anywhere with a high concentration of black & brown people, like NY, DC, LA, NJ, Chicago, ect, CT got on board cause of they used the school shooting to spew emotional anti gun propaganda. All the places that need their 2nd amendment rights the most, which would probably solve their crime problem… Coincidence? I think not. & I’m not the only one who feels this way. Dr. Ron Paul spoke about this undercover racism, along with a few other very intelligent & brave people.

      • jtheripper November 14, 2014, 4:26 am

        Excellent point. This rifle is a great opportunity to educate some ignorant sheeple & show how stupid the gun grabbing laws are & get them to admit that they are just reacting to how scary the rifle looks. & expose the the REAL agenda, which is keeping anywhere with a high concentration of black & brown people disarmed. Of course they would like to disarm everyone, but the main focus is on anywhere with a high concentration of black & brown people, like NY, DC, LA, NJ, Chicago, ect, CT got on board cause of they used the school shooting to spew emotional anti gun propaganda. All the places that need their 2nd amendment rights the most, which would probably solve their crime problem… Coincidence? I think not. & I’m not the only one who feels this way. Dr. Ron Paul spoke about this undercover racism, along with a few other very intelligent & brave people.

  • IntheStan November 10, 2014, 9:43 am

    This rifle is junk! Its for people who are willing to bend our Constitutional rights. Its like buying a muscle car with a 6 cylinder automatic tranny. Fucking bow down to the liberals instead of standing up for your rights, you dont deserve a rifle. Boycott that piece of shit they call a rifle. Funny you can buy a pump shotgun since forever and now you can buy a semi auto shot gun. Now the liberals want a us to buy pump rifles instead of semi auto. Fucking retards

    • Administrator November 10, 2014, 10:08 am

      Why is it junk because you don’t agree with the political wrangling behind it? If you live in a ban state and you can’t leave because of your living, why does an alternative have to be “junk”? For that matter, why do so many people on the internet feel like they have to be nasty if they have anything to say at all. It is like when you have good headlights the assholes who flash their high beams at you because they are used to shitty headlights. Why can’t some people just have a discussion without being an asshole?

      • jim November 10, 2014, 10:59 am

        I can see why InttheStan doesn’t like the pump action AR. I don’t think that it has anything to do with the craftmanship of the weapon. The treasonist gun grabbing politicians that currently are in office are the ones that are dividing the people. Their ignorance about firearms is a major security issue. The US could fall victim to a foriegn invasion only because a few libtards are afraid of a black hunting rifle with tactical furniture.

    • Brian Meyette November 10, 2014, 11:09 am

      Another way of looking at the same concept is that the liberals have outlawed certain guns, so guns like this are our way of fighting back. And I think it’s much better to fight back, than to just accept the liberals’ bans. I see it as just the opposite of bowing down to the liberals – this IS standing up for our rights by making new guns that get around their stupid laws. So we both feel the same way about the situation – just different viewpoints of whether this gun is a “knuckling under” or “fighting back” – I see it as the latter. And to me any AR variant is a cool new development and I like it.

    • Ray November 10, 2014, 11:31 am

      What’s the matter, InTheStan? You too stupid to get your point across with out having to resort to profanity. I could understand some street corner thug or a pimple faced teenager trying to act like he is an adult. Calm it down. Talk like you have at least some modicum of intelligence. And what is your problem with this firearm. There are all kinds and designs of firearms out there. If you do not like it, then do not buy it.

      • Lee November 10, 2014, 12:36 pm

        Agree. I’m sure no Saint and I have used bad language many times, however, not in print. All I remember of his post is the profanity. Lee Retired Army Aviator.

    • Mark N. November 12, 2014, 1:30 am

      So are you saying that people in ban states should just give up having an AR style rifle until they can get the laws changed? Or would you prefer that they stand up, get mowed down on felony charges, and lose their gun rights forever? Personally, I follow the first rule of a gunfight–have a gun.

  • Nick D November 10, 2014, 8:30 am

    DOES it take only proprietary mags or will Magpuls, etc. work? Thanks

    • TROY November 10, 2014, 9:16 am

      Not proprietary – any standard magazine will work!

      • Richard February 6, 2015, 6:11 pm

        were can we order this rifle at and when are you cutting the 308 loose in 2015 ?

  • D Hicks November 10, 2014, 7:36 am

    As an old AR fan,good to see one that all most anyone can own all most anywhere.I live in a state where I can legally own all types of firearms.I like my pump action model 62 Winchester .22 but I don’t shoot it much,I like my pump shotguns.I’d like to see the TROY PAR in person, because I’m not really interested in a center fire pump action rifle. The rifle has some good features, like the fluted chamber.Nice article.Thanks

  • Rob November 10, 2014, 7:25 am

    Good review, but reviewer should have emphasized more that it is a .223 rifle and not to use 5.56 military ammo, as we have all been warned over and over. The ammo is not the same.

    • Klyde November 10, 2014, 10:33 am

      The rollmark in the photos shows .223, however,
      Troy specifications indicate this rifle is chambered to accept both .223 and 5.56.
      The ammo is not the same, but this rifle handles both rounds, according to Troy specifications..

    • Brian Meyette November 10, 2014, 11:00 am

      Good point. It’s unclear what caliber it is. It is stamped .223 both on barrel and on lower. Yet spec says .223/5.56mm. What’s stamped on gun seems much less likely to be a typo than what’s posted in the spec. If actually .223, I am curious as to why it would be made in that caliber, thus shutting out the vast inventory of 5.56mm ammo out there. Perhaps reviewer or Troy can clear up what caliber this gun is (and WHY, if .223).

      • Mr Brett November 10, 2014, 7:19 pm

        I’m not an AR expert… I think maybe .223 being a “sporting round” will be more politically acceptable than a military designation, in phobic locales. The “.223” isn’t really a typo as it does accept that ammo in any case. I have heard of 5.56 marked barrels actually not using the 5.56 spec but the.223 spec instead, that wouldn’t be good.

    • Lee November 10, 2014, 12:30 pm

      Really? The 5.56 and .223 ammo is not the same? I really want to learn. Military brass used to be thicker brass so one had to decrease the “Max” powder charge when reloading and the primer pocket had to be reamed to accept the new primer. Other than those “differences” I notice no difference. I always understood that 5.56mm is .223inches. Lee, Retired Army Aviator.

      • Kent Masrshall November 10, 2014, 5:32 pm

        Of course the .223 and 5.56 are NOT the same. It happens that some rifles will take both (safely), but if someone takes the trouble to look up the relevant specs for both cartridges, including reloading data, it will be obvious they are NOT the SAME. Close, but not the same. This is the kind of thing we argue about, and throw insults back and for? C’mon, people…….

      • Kent Masrshall November 10, 2014, 5:32 pm

        Of course the .223 and 5.56 are NOT the same. It happens that some rifles will take both (safely), but if someone takes the trouble to look up the relevant specs for both cartridges, including reloading data, it will be obvious they are NOT the SAME. Close, but not the same. This is the kind of thing we argue about, and throw insults back and forth? C’mon, people…….

      • Mark N. November 12, 2014, 1:25 am

        5.56 has a different shoulder and is loaded to a significantly higher pressure. 5.56 does not seat properly into a .223 chamber, and the higher pressure can result in nasty Kabooms. However, .223 does fit into a 5.56 chamber and there is no risk of overpressure. The one exception is a rifle with a .223 Wylde chamber, which is rated to the same pressure as 5.56 but has a tighter chamber than the 5.56 resulting in greater accuracy.

  • michael November 10, 2014, 4:28 am

    Do they have any plans for a 308 version? I hope so!

    • Steve November 10, 2014, 9:09 am

      A .308 version would be welcomed by me also. How about going to multi platform like the AR?
      Great self defense weapon.

    • TROY November 10, 2014, 9:19 am

      Yes! Planning to ship in early 2015.

  • Mauritius November 10, 2014, 4:27 am

    No thanks, but I’m sure this would work great on a mother and her child.

    • Steve November 10, 2014, 9:05 am

      As would a car, knife, crow bar, bat, and so forth you ignorant liberal traitor.

      • Schmucky November 10, 2014, 11:25 am

        He’s talking about Ruby Ridge…

    • Brian Meyette November 10, 2014, 10:53 am

      When I make a comment, it first says “awaiting moderation”. If comments are being moderated, why the heck would an inane troll post like this be approved?

      • Mr Brett November 10, 2014, 7:05 pm

        …and it’s even inappropriate from a common-sense, technical standpoint. The feds wouldn’t use a Pump Action Rifle…

  • C. Hickson November 10, 2014, 3:29 am

    Two things I’m curious about, Dave… OK, and maybe a third. Unless I missed it, why no comment (or photo) regarding the bolt? Second, why a fluted chamber on a manually cycled rifle? Third’ish… flutes for crud accumulation – issues with cases sticking… a unique chamber otherwise?

    • What I know November 10, 2014, 11:33 am

      The fluted chamber is so slide doesnt open during firing!

      It helps lock the round in the chamber, during firing,
      if the round or bolt is not completely in battery, and fires,
      this keeps the bolt from flying in you face.

      When the casing swells, during firing it holds the round in place
      in the chamber, after firing the case shrinks and releases from the
      chamber.

      A very safe way to keep the gun from blowing up
      when something goes badly wrong!

      Like shot stroking a pump gun, and anyone who has shot a pump
      shotgun, any length of time, know, about miss feeds, double feed,
      or not getting the slide all the way in battery, when you are excited!!

      Its well thought out for slide guns, there is a lot less in this, gun
      to stop the bolt from leaving this gun, than other AR’s.

      H&K has used something like this for years and their guns WORK!

    • Gunsmith November 11, 2014, 1:36 am

      H&K use “fluted” barrels because there rifle, model 91 & clones, do not use a gas blow back system or a rotating bolt. Instead, when the round is fired, the force from the round pushs the bolt carrier back on 2 bearings. The flutes allow gas to leak around the expended shell to push the shell back, easing in the extraction process. On a bolt action rifle, you rotate the bolt out of the chamber by hand to extract the spent shell. The bolt carrier has a heavy spring that helps pop the shell out of the chamber when you rotate bolt after the spent round. On most semi-auto’s and automatic’s that use a rotating bolt the gas from the spent round is redirected to the bolt by a gas tube or a piston to push the bolt carrier back. As the bolt carrier is forced back it rotates the bolt, unlocking it from the chamber.
      From looking at what pictures they did post, it’s clear that they use not gas system of any kind. With at in mind, I would venture to say they ran into a problem of spent rounds that would not release from the chamber because the shells expanded in the chamber. I also would venture to say that they eliminated a rotating bolt carrier due to the fact that they installed a bolt lock button. It would be redundant to have a bolt lock and a rotating bolt that locks in the chamber. So the flutes would be necessary in extracting the spent round from the chamber.

      • Harvey August 20, 2015, 9:59 am

        The rifle uses a standard AR bolt and cam pin, it rotates. The flutes are entirely not needed. And how do I know this fact? Because I have rebarreled several PAR’s with conventionally chambered AR barrels without any issues.

  • Al November 9, 2014, 9:43 pm

    Already illegal in NYC: Any long gun that can accept an ammunition feeding device with a capacity of more than 5 rounds – any action or caliber. It doesn’t matter that it’s not semi-auto; liberals impart guilt by association and will find any way to implicate that weapon as a tool of criminality.

    • roger November 10, 2014, 6:13 am

      They made the Pump AR back in 1994 during the Semi auto ban too. Would not be worth the money unless you are in a ban State. Too much when an AR can be had for $600.

      • Lee November 10, 2014, 12:04 pm

        Where can I get an AR 15 for $600? I live in Colorado. Thanks.

        • Joe November 10, 2014, 1:38 pm

          Fort Worth, Texas

        • Daniel November 11, 2014, 10:49 am

          Core 15 has a sweet rifle I bought for $587, also omni hybrid (reinforced polymer lower) is a rifle for under $500. Just keep in mind you get what you pay for 🙂

        • DM February 6, 2015, 9:37 am

          Denver guns and ammo fairly frequently

        • JACK SMITH November 23, 2015, 1:46 pm

          S&W A/R 15’s are selling on many websites for under $600.00 and some even under $500.00 . I got mine for 4.96.00 last year and began shooting right out of the box and have never had a charging problem, misfire or failure to feed or eject. Good hunting.

    • jim January 4, 2015, 8:54 pm

      nyc yes not in other paets of ny

Leave a Comment

Send this to a friend