Brand New from Sig–Legion 9mm Pistol–Hands On Review

Sig Sauer P229 Legion 9mm

When you hear the word Legion, you might think of a bunch of Roman guys wearing skirts who are intent about perforating people with long spears. Or you might think of rough looking dudes with strange white hats that look like the top section of a wedding cake. That would be the French Foreign Legion. For centuries, the word Legion has referred to very serious people undertaking very serious tasks. It’s with this warrior spirit in mind that the folks at Sig Sauer are releasing Legion.

I don’t refer to it as “the Legion” because Legion is envisioned to be a family of gear and programs targeted at serious people who want serious gear. Initially, the Legion product family will include handguns, knives, holsters, and tactical lights, along with a Legion community that brings together folks who care about hardcore guns and gear. Over time, the Legion family will be expanded to cover other handgun models, rifles, suppressors, and optics.

“We have worked with elite SIG users for years as we have developed the Legion,” said Jeff Creamer, Executive Director and General Merchandise Manager for SIG SAUER, Inc. “We wanted to know what custom features professionals were seeking as factory enhancements. The result is a line of high-performance firearms and accessories that deliver not only what elite users need, but what they want.”

Sig Sauer P229 Legion 9mm

Sig Sauer P229 Legion 9mm

The first guns in the Legion series are a Sig Sauer P229 and P226, both chambered in 9mm. We’ll talk about what’s next in more detail later in this article.

I was fortunate enough to get my grubby little hands on a Sig Sauer P229 Legion 9mm a while back and had to time to study and shoot to see what makes it different. In short, Legion Series guns offer a “custom” gun with modifications that a professional would make or desire, right out of the box. During a pre-launch conference call, one of the Sig team described the Legion series as gear that a Navy SEAL might carry when off duty. That’s the basic idea behind the concept, so let’s take a deeper look at the first Legion handgun from Sig.

What’s Different About the Legion P229 9mm?

The best way to think of the Sig P229 Legion is to envision what a serious shooter might have a custom gunsmith do to their new P229 to make it the ideal carry gun. Let’s take a look at some of the differences. Before we get into details, keep in mind that the overall frame and slide size are the same as standard P229, so holsters will be compatible with the new Legion model.

Starting with the frame, you’ll see a number of enhancements. The Legion model features a more aggressive beavertail than the standard P229 model. It’s not as large as that of Sig’s Enhanced Elite model, as this gun is intended for concealed carry. The front of the grip features checkering rather than the horizontal line texture on the standard P229. Above that, there is a more aggressive undercut like that on Sig’s X5 models. This allows the middle finger of the firing hand to ride higher on the grip. Your middle finger actually ends up into the trigger guard area due to the recessed cut. The last difference is a new checkering pattern on the bottom of the trigger guard. This is done to help keep your support hand from moving during rapid fire. The index finger of your support hand will contact this checkered area when you assume a two-handed grip. It really makes a difference as it helps eliminate the need for support hand repositioning.

Front cocking serrations have been added to the Legion models. The rail is unchanged.

Front cocking serrations have been added to the Legion models. The rail is unchanged.

Checking has been added to the bottom of the trigger guard to help keep the support hand in place.

Checking has been added to the bottom of the trigger guard to help keep the support hand in place.

Moving to the slide, you’ll see the addition of forward slide serrations. While these are a personal preference (I like them), their presence is unlikely to create problems if you choose not to use them for press checks. The only other visible difference on the slide is an engraved Legion logo on the top of the slide, just forward of the rear sight.

Sig has made some tweaks to the controls as well. The slide stop lever and decocking lever have aggressively checkered surfaces instead of the simple grooves on standard P229 models. Both controls are smaller and lower profile. This is another seemingly small change that I really like. Both controls are large enough to operate easily, but now they’re out of the way. If you are right handed, the controls don’t create extra space when carrying inside the waistband. Also, the standard slide stop lever on a P229 gets in the way of my two-handed grip so that I often don’t get a slide lock back on the last round. My thumb tends to ride on the lever which move it just enough to prevent the slide from locking in place. Not so on the Legion. While that may be a personal problem solved, I think a lot of folks will like the smaller and flatter controls. The takedown lever is unchanged as is the magazine release button.

The slide stop lever and decocking lever are lower profile, smaller, and have a checkering pattern.

The slide stop lever and decocking lever are lower profile, smaller, and have a checkering pattern.

The Legion logo is engraved on the top of the slide just forward of the rear sight.

The Legion logo is engraved on the top of the slide just forward of the rear sight.

The grips are now a two-piece G10 material. They’re aggressively textured and sport Legion Medallions on both sides. The sides and back are textured, but the pattern is shallow so it won’t tear up your hands. It’s plenty “sticky” and does a great job of keeping your gun stable in your hand during fire. Compared to the standard one-piece grips, the new Legion G10 grips add perhaps one-eighth of an inch circumference. As the new grips are two pieces, screws are included (unlike guns with the one-piece grips) so if you add Lasergrips, you already have all the parts you need. When I added Lasergrips to a standard P229, I had to purchase grip screws from Brownells.

The Legion comes with two-piece G10 grips.

The Legion comes with two-piece G10 grips.

There is an aggressive checkering pattern on the front of the grip.

There is an aggressive checkering pattern on the front of the grip.

The Legion has newly designed night sights. Sig calls them XRAY3 Hi Vis Night Sights. They’re different in a couple of ways. The front sight is Tritium powered but surrounded in the sight housing by a green fiber optic circle. This helps the front sight “glow” in daytime use while staying bright when the Tritium kicks in during low light conditions. The rear sights are also Tritium powered, but both rear dots are much smaller than the standard SigLite rear sights. This is another feature I really like. There is no ambiguity at all as to which dots are front and rear in dark conditions. The small rear sights are large enough to be seen but are dwarfed by the significantly larger front sight dot.

The new night sight is a Tritium lamp surrounded by a fiber-optic ring for improved daylight visibility.

The new night sight is a Tritium lamp surrounded by a fiber-optic ring for improved daylight visibility.

The rear sights are noticeably smaller than the front to minimize confusion in the dark and speed front sight acquisition.

The rear sights are noticeably smaller than the front to minimize confusion in the dark and speed front sight acquisition.

The guide rod is now stainless steel, adding a bit of weight up front. The idea is that adding weight under the barrel helps to tame muzzle flip, allowing for faster follow-up shots on target. You might also assume that the steel guide rod will provide an extra layer of durability over time and operation is smoother with the polished steel surface interfacing with the recoil spring.

Note the polished steel guide rod for extra weight up front and to smooth out the action.

Note the polished steel guide rod for extra weight up front and to smooth out the action.

The rear sight body is shaped for one-handed slide rack operation.

The rear sight body is shaped for one-handed slide rack operation.

Saving the best for last, we have to talk about the new trigger. It’s a GrayGuns, Inc. Intermediate Adjustable Trigger that simply rocks. Here’s why. The reset on the new Legion trigger is just about ⅛-inch. My standard Sig P229 resets after about ⅜ of an inch. That’s a huge difference that really helps you control rapid fire strings without pulling off target. The double-action trigger consistently measures eight and a half pounds according to my Timney Triggers gauge. On my standard P229, the double-action trigger consistently pulls at nine pounds. The feel of the double-action press is also noticeably different. On the standard P229, there’s a good bit of stacking towards the end of the motion. On the Legion, the pressure is constant throughout the pull, much like what you would find on a double-action revolver. The single-action press is very similar to the standard P229, with both guns measuring right at four pounds. The only difference I could detect with the Legion single-action trigger press is that the take-up stage is much smoother, probably a result of the extra polishing work inside.

The new custom trigger is fantastic.

The new custom trigger is fantastic.

The MSRP of the P229 and P226 9mm Legion models is $1,428.

Lasergrips?

As this is built to be the perfect carry gun, I decided I wanted to add Crimson Trace Lasergrips right off the bat. Yes, it’s a bit of a shame to take those really sweet G10 grips off, but I insist on lasers on all of my carry guns. Besides, for this article, I wanted to verify fit and function so I could accurately share that information here. Since the controls are tweaked a bit on the Legion model, I wasn’t 100% sure that the standard Crimson Trace LG-429 Lasergrips for Sig Sauer P228/229 would fit and operate properly. The included G10 grips have a small cutout under the slide lock lever and I was a bit concerned that the Lasergrips might interfere.

Even with the new beaver tail and control design, the existing Crimson Trace LG-429 Lasergrips for P229 work just fine.

Even with the new beaver tail and control design, the existing Crimson Trace LG-429 Lasergrips for P229 work just fine.

I removed the flathead grip screws and the G10 grips easily came off in their respective two halves. Adding the Lasergrips was a snap, and it turns out that the Crimson Trace LG-429 grips have a beveled shelf all the way across the top of the left grip. There is no interference with the lower (closer to the frame) placement of the slide stop lever. It rides noticeably closer to the surface of the LG-420 grip panel but works just fine. The Lasergrips shape was also entirely compatible with the new beavertail on the Legion P229. The gun I have is an early production model, so there should be no change from what you can soon buy in the store.

I was a little worried that the new controls might not allow fitting of a Crimson Trace Lasergrip as they do not have the same cutout as the G10 grips, but the Lasergrips worked fine.

I was a little worried that the new controls might not allow fitting of a Crimson Trace Lasergrip as they do not have the same cutout as the G10 grips, but the Lasergrips worked fine.

The new G10 grips are ever so slightly larger around than the standard one-piece P229 grips.

The new G10 grips are ever so slightly larger around than the standard one-piece P229 grips.

Holsters

As the exterior dimensions are the same, you should have no trouble using the P229 Legion with any existing P229 holsters. I carried this gun using a Galco Side Snap Scabbard OWB and a Galco KingTuk IWB holster and fit was perfect.

The Legion fit perfectly in this Galco Miami Classic II for Sig P229 models.

The Legion fit perfectly in this Galco Miami Classic II for Sig P229 models.

On the new front, I had the opportunity to try a new Legion branded OWB holster from BlackPoint, along with a single magazine carrier. The Blackpoint holster is a Kydex shell but uses leather wings mounted on front and back. The belt loops are attached to these wings so that the holster can mold around the curve of your body. Kydex supports the gun and pliable leather provides a comfortable fit. This holster also holds the gun high relative to the belt line, which makes concealment easier. The single magazine carrier is built the same way using leather wings. Two sets of belt loops are included for each, allowing a tight mount with either 1 ½ or 1 ¾ inch belts.

The BlackPoint Tactical holster uses leather wings for comfort and a Kydex shell for durability and security.

The BlackPoint Tactical holster uses leather wings for comfort and a Kydex shell for durability and security.

Shooting the Legion

Not exactly a carry configuration, but addition of the scope really helps for accuracy testing at 25 yards.

Not exactly a carry configuration, but the addition of the scope really helps for accuracy testing at 25 yards.

Earlier I talked about the trigger improvements, and these really show at the range. This gun shoots like a dream. The new G10 grips are sticky, and combined with the lower recoil of the 9mm, this gun stays put in the hand. The three included magazines are 15-round capacity, so you can top the Legion off to 16 total rounds of 9mm.

I can't remember the last time I got a 1.02" group from a production gun at 25 yards.

I can’t remember the last time I got a 1.02″ group from a production gun at 25 yards.

The Barnes TAC-XPD 9mm +P shot a number of five-shot groups under two inches.

The Barnes TAC-XPD 9mm +P shot a number of five-shot groups under two inches.

For accuracy testing, I mounted a Bushnell Elite 3500 2-7x handgun scope on the Legion using a UM Tactical rail scope mount. This provides a perfect sight picture at 25 yards in order to minimize shooter sighting error. For this gun, I did the full group protocol, shooting various types of 9mm ammunition into five-shot groups at 25 yards distance. For each ammo type, I fired five consecutive five-shot groups and calculated average, smallest, and largest group sizes.

Sig Sauer Legion accuracy

As you can see, this is one accurate compact pistol. If I’ve gotten a five-shot, 25-yard group of 1.02 inches before from a production gun, I can’t remember when.

All (6) five-shot groups using Sig Sauer's 124 grain V-Crown load came in at less than two inches.

All (6) five-shot groups using Sig Sauer’s 124-grain V-Crown load came in at less than two inches.

I miscounted on this one and fired six shots, but the group was still just 1.19 inches from 25 yards.

I miscounted on this one and fired six shots, but the group was still just 1.19 inches from 25 yards.

I tested velocity using the same ammo, using a Shooting Chrony Beta Master Chronograph placed 15 feet down range. For each variety of ammo, I fired ten-shot strings through the chrony to measure average, extreme spread from highest to lowest velocity, and standard deviation.

Sig Sauer Legion velocity

The Legion Community

When you buy a Legion gun, you have the opportunity to join Sig’s new exclusive Legion community. The first tangible benefit will be the custom pistol case and model-specific challenge coin that ships to you free of charge. It’s a nice case that holds the gun, all three magazines assuming one is in the gun and the challenge coin. There’s an empty cutout in the case for a Legion knife should you decide to add that to your collection.

When you enroll in the free Legion Community, Sig will send you this custom case and model-specific challenge coin.

When you enroll in the free Legion Community, Sig will send you this custom case and model-specific challenge coin.

Some of the optional gear available to Legion Community members.

Some of the optional gear available to Legion Community members.

Speaking of Legion knives, Sig has partnered with a number of like-minded companies to create Legion gear. As a Legion community member, you’ll have access to purchase custom knives from companies like Rick Hinderer, Daniel Winkler, Quartermaster, Ernest Emerson, Duane Dyer from Strider, and Zero Tolerance by Kershaw. Other gear companies like Surefire will offer Legion gear in the private section of the online Sig Store.

The Legion program also provides quarterly emails about new gear, programs, and training tips as well as advance information on new Sig guns and related products.

Other Legion Models

The 9mm P229 and P226 Legion guns are first off the line, with a P226 Single-action Only 9mm gun coming later this fall. Sig intends to produce the P226 and P229 models in .357 Sig and .40 S&W too, but the timing of market availability is not yet clear.

 

{ 66 comments… add one }
  • Berretvert13dble June 18, 2016, 3:59 pm

    Whatever! Marketing, juicy business! I gonna to tell you something, the best of sig is the sig 2022, (sig Pro) French gendarmerie and special forces use to it, design in Switzerland and made in Germany. However I have px4 beretta full size, my score at 25yard is not really bad, soft trigger, and soft price, why to spend more!!! Show off probably, same thing about bmw USA, you pay for a German brand while it’s made in South Africa, Golf made in Mexico……

  • Joe schmoe May 24, 2016, 11:35 pm

    Why no photo of the left side Crimson Trace grip? That’s the side that is more critical for fit,

    • Joe schmoe May 24, 2016, 11:39 pm

      Ah the one photo does show enough detail. Still, I’d like to see the entire grip with the CT installed, both sides.

  • Major pain May 24, 2016, 2:17 am

    Great looking and no doubt functioning pistol. The legion marketing ploy only serves to make me question if I will purchase another Sig. Paying top dollar to pay for other high priced, exclusive stuff? How insulting.

    • jaybeaux June 2, 2016, 2:25 am

      I hear ya on the price I have a Sig p250c .40 cal., glock 19 gen 4, fns9, and they all shoot great and are easier to find accessories for and the mags and upgrades are alot cheaper and just as good, I like my Sig but I don’t care if it says legion or not I’ll shoot a target with my guns against anybody,

  • Pearson May 7, 2016, 12:48 am

    What a way to make an Sig owner feel like crap because they choose not to spend over $1400 on one of their products. I’ve owned Sig pistols since 1996 and always felt good about my purchases until now. Just because I don’t own an Legion doesn’t mean that I am not an serious Sig owner or shooter of their firearms as those who do.

    • Gelu Bogdanescu December 22, 2016, 4:40 pm

      You made s good point,but,if you were to BUY A GUN NOW,would you buy a legion series ?? It would help me make my own decision..Thx..

  • Bill March 4, 2016, 7:54 pm

    I have always been a Glock guy. I’ve owned five Glocks and have never had a problem with any of them, but I’ve recently bought the 226 legion and I don’t think I can ever go back to Glock again. After shooting my 226 Glocks feel like holding a block of plastic. The trigger is amazing. Comparing new legion to Glock is about the same as Glock to Hipoint.

  • Jim Raymond February 22, 2016, 9:45 am

    Why spend so much money for a duded up Sig, you can get one of the new Walther PPQ 45 autos for $700′ half what this thing costs, with the best trigger out there, better grip, and in 45acp, 12plus one how can any nine compare.

    • Progunshooter April 1, 2016, 11:11 pm

      I can give you a hundred reasons why but here’s a few, the fact that your seriously comparing a plastic ppq striker fired gun to an all metal & for all intent & purposes competition grade sa/da Trigger shows your knowledge in the field of pistols. 2ndly how about the fact 45acp ammo cost another 10-15 dollars per box over 9mm, & the fact the PPQ 45 is immensely larger than the legion p229 for edc. If I was worried every day the possibility of being stalked or possibly attacked by a say a Lion around the corner alley maybe a Polar Bear I guess Id lug the Big Long Heavy ppq 45 around all day. Fortunately for me at least all I have to worry about is that 1 % chance in my lifetime id have to protect myself or family from a bad guy. I dont know to many bad guys walking through 16 rounds of Critical Defense +P 9mm rounds & if he did I would hand him my gun & let him shoot me. So theres just a few reasons why Id chose the Sig nit to mention comparing the legion to a ppq is like comparing a Cadillac cts to a 1967 studebaker…

  • Jebby January 24, 2016, 10:05 pm

    That gun sure got a purty mouth

  • Jebby January 24, 2016, 10:05 pm

    That gun sure got a purty mouth

  • James December 30, 2015, 1:54 pm

    Just picked up a 229 legion for 1k and small change .will update later on performance. Range day Friday.msrp is misleading .find a local shop and save 400$.

  • John S. December 26, 2015, 11:04 pm

    Where can I Purchase this piece, Sig 229- Legion ,With all of the above acoutrements mentioned in this artical ?????????

    *And I do mean all , of the above , With * EXTRA Mag’s ??????????????????????????????????????????????

    I Thank You Much

    J .E.S.

  • steve December 25, 2015, 10:09 pm

    If it had a barsto barrel, maybe it would be worth the money. I am sure the trigger is fantastic , as greys stuff usually is. But, a super accurate barrel would make it real nice, imho

  • Aaron Lackey November 30, 2015, 9:42 am

    Where and how did you order it though? I can read articles on it all day long but how do I purchase it?

  • Willie Gonzalez November 3, 2015, 9:27 pm

    Are the 226 MK-25 and the new Legion have the same size/dimensions? Can I use the same holster for both of them? I just purchased the new Legion. Is my new toy from Sig, I have a 228, 229′ and a 227 and now the Legion.

  • Mateo November 2, 2015, 9:09 pm

    Soon they’ll offer them in rainbow color too. Nothing but smoke and mirrors.

  • Garland October 15, 2015, 7:22 pm

    Great to see a new P229 !!! To bad about the price, thats what I paid for both of the ones I already own. Think they will do a Legion 556r???? Id also like the SAS P229 two tone brought out of retirement…

  • MERX October 14, 2015, 8:05 pm

    It seems a lot like the Elite Dark series which i have the P220 version. If so this gonna be a great series. Hopefully the Elites will still stay around.

  • D.C. October 14, 2015, 6:31 pm

    That is a cool gun

  • Devin Browning October 14, 2015, 10:19 am

    1 Sig or 3 Glock19’s

  • Ernesto October 13, 2015, 8:59 am

    Sig was a good company but new management move in and now it luck off the draw l could tell you lot more but it would take more time

  • Troy October 12, 2015, 11:11 pm

    SIG’s are great; no question. I have a 229 in 40 that i have carried for LE duty for 18.5 of my 20 yrs so far (started with revolver, my S&W 686 that i bought when i turned 21, 2 yrs before starting my career. My 229 has, conservatively, 8000+ rounds through it. I have replaced the recoil spring, and of course i put night sights on it abt 10 yrs ago. It is now on its second set. I bought a used 228 abt 10 yrs ago as a backup in case something breaks. I also have a vintage P220 (West Germany) and a P239 in 357 Sig (nice ccw gun; good ballistics. I like Sig, and i like DA with a hammer. I have a number of 1911’s, and they are great, but tuned 1911’s often seem to need regular tuning. Sigs do not; neither do Glocks or XD’s. I also prefer the more stable, substantial feel of a metal frame, even if it is alloy. You generally will not run into problems limp wristing (awkward positions or 1-handed) like you easily might with a polymer frame gun. Just a few points based on experience. Stay safe!

  • Lee October 12, 2015, 9:55 pm

    Soooo….. you take a regular P line Sig, do nothing but some cosmetic touch, give it a fancy name, and charge out the yang for it…

    Its a business model that pretty much only sells to nostalgia market buyers, and this one will be limited to the die hard Sig fanboys. I’m still trying to figure out the point. Sig does this a lot. I remember the USPSA, the SAS, the Blackwater, the Extreme.

    Bottom line, its not a new gun, its a market ploy. And in three years, they will stop making them, find another way to dress up the same gun, and do it all over. Sig makes a fine gun, but darn, they need to hire some of the guys from recoil magazine, get some fresh talent and outside the box thinking.

    • Gregory Wright January 31, 2016, 12:57 pm

      Yeah, you gotta admit those legions are real pretty.

    • Joe Nobody June 10, 2016, 8:01 pm

      No, the reset on the trigger is much better than on elite or other models. Try running one before you run your mouth.

  • Daniel October 12, 2015, 9:40 pm

    This sadly appears to be another gimmick from the Sig marketing department. Their current crop of pistols are a very poor reflection of the quality and reliability that made their reputation in the 80’s and 90’s. The original W. German P225, P226, P228, and P220 stand head and shoulders above these “tarted” up models they offer today. If you want a Sig, buy a proper Sig Sauer and have no regrets.

  • JImmy Drew October 12, 2015, 9:40 pm

    I just bought a Sig 227 45 Cal… and absolutely love it… Cost $774.00 at Shoot Straight… I was amazed because it is $200.00 more on line….. anyway, after buying… yeah it was impulse because of my grandson.. and the great price 😉 I read that they have a problem with with the trigger retaining pin breaking…. than I read more and they said it was early models… anyway, no gun is completely free of defects… only shot a couple of hundred rounds so far.. but both me and my grandson and some of our friends love it…… yes I am interested in the Legion…

  • Jeff October 12, 2015, 5:05 pm

    Not sure if it’s $400 better than a M11-A1?

  • Larry Koehn October 12, 2015, 3:54 pm

    I have a Glock 23 I paid 567.00 for. I bought a Lone Wolf ported barrel 125.00, Advantage Tactical sights 95.00 and a Taran Tactical 3.5 pound trigger kit 45.00, for a total of 832.00. Is the Sig worth an extra 600.00 bucks? I don’t think so. Is it tougher or more reliable or more accurate at combat ranges? I don’t think so and I installed those parts on the Glock for a zero dollar labor charge.

    • doug October 12, 2015, 9:17 pm

      Almost all the reason’s i dont buy a block/glock, the other reason is grip angle sucks!!!!

  • Chuck Petersen October 12, 2015, 3:40 pm

    First let me say that I have “3” Sigs. A 229 Stainless Steel Elite, a P229 Elite, and a Stainless Steel P229 in the 357 Sig Version. The other 2 are 9mm’s. My comments would be as follows. Why didn’t you build these new “Legions” with a “Match Grade Barrel”???? The other comment I have is Iam finding the Sigs in general have what I call a “fat” grip which is just slightly a little large for my hand. I now carry for my daily CCW carry a 9mm compact “Sphinx” which is really great.

  • JtothaK October 12, 2015, 2:37 pm

    “…gear that a Navy SEAL might carry when off duty” cough *Glock 19* cough

    • Aaron January 1, 2016, 2:46 am

      Exactly! Not to mention Naval Special Warfare has now approved the Glock 19 to be the Seals new handgun platform citing many reasons, so not only off duty but on duty in harms way they will be issued and carrying Glock 19’s.

  • Dan October 12, 2015, 2:36 pm

    Sig usually makes excellent weapons. I own two, a 1911 and a 229. I believe this new iteration is called a 225-1, evidently performs well for professionals and no surprise there. I won’t be purchasing one due to cost, however I believe the company should have distanced itself from the first p225 name lest somebody get confused. The 225 I owned performed like an over caffeinated Tasmanian Devil. It was the most uncontrolled weapon I ever owned when firing in an offensive or defensive situation, emptying the 10 round mag in under four seconds accurately. It jumped, pushed, and I simply could not keep the weapon under acceptable control. I would never use this 225 again under any circumstance, certainly never a carry weapon.

    I know there are people who will say I probably used the wrong ammunition, wrong grip, wrong etc., and simply wrong operation. As a professional I am an experienced. My sole reason for this diatribe is because no weapon is immune from failure, no company is perfect, and mistakes are made by operator and company alike. I’ve seen both happen. Hopefully when we carry, we use the weapon that we have the most experience with, the one we literally trust with our life, and one that simply works. I do carry my Sig 1911, but I got rid of the 225 quickly. Stop kneeling at the Sig altar and suggest that it is infallible, I’ve experienced their failures and even Sig won’t make the claims that previous contributors have suggested.

  • seank October 12, 2015, 1:54 pm

    As others here have commented, the words Sig and failure are as far apart as it is possible to be in the gun world. All guns have failures. I own six Sig Sauer pistols. I am lucky enough to be a part of a shooting club with sunrise to sunset access and key card entry gate. I can shoot any time there is light. I take advantage of this. I shoot my Sigs. A lot. I have never had even on failure. No failures to eject/extract/chamber. I have had rounds hard or faulty primers that either needed a double strike to fire or needed a type one malfunction clearance. I also own 1911’s, XD’s, etc. The 1911’s are certainly not perfect the ones I own are tight frame to slide fit and this has caused problems; I’ve also had some failure to chamber mostly with 9mm; the 1911 platform was designed around the 45 ACP cartridge. My XD’s have been similarly reliable to my Sigs. Literally no failures. Sigs, noticeably, do no have a super tight slide to frame fit; they gain their accuracy from the barrel lockup, unless the slide to frame fit is extremely sloppy (they are not) that area will cause no loss of accuracy. Because the Sigs have a somewhat ‘loose’ slide to frame fit, they do not exhibit any tendency to jam up.

  • nvjim October 12, 2015, 1:52 pm

    Like the concept…would rather have the option to NOT have a rail on a carry gun

  • Ringo Lapua October 12, 2015, 1:38 pm

    I would love to own a Sig Legion but President Obama said on TV that guns are bad and should be banned. What should I do?

    • CWIII October 14, 2015, 7:26 pm

      Hang your targets on your TV!!!

      • loveamerica June 1, 2016, 2:03 pm

        lol. agreed!!!

  • John Lucien October 12, 2015, 12:26 pm

    What the heck is making this north of $1400 when I can get a brand new P229/P226/P200 for around $800-street price, and if I want an Elite with night-sights and a beaver-tail I am maybe looking at $900… I don’t see any improvement on this thing that is worth another $600. Adjustable trigger – Why would anyone what that? I can adjust any SIG trigger for free and the trigger re-set kit to shorten the re-set is like $80… So for $520 more I get what exactly a cool box and a decoder ring to get into a retarded web-site? People, save your $. Don’t get me wrong – SIG’s are great weapons and I love my P229, but you can get them new for $800-$900 with most of this crap on it already. This is just some marketing crap to grab more $ from you. Save you $ and buy a SIG P220 Elite and spend the $500-$600 left over on ammo and/or a back-up weapon.

    • Pohnz1 December 1, 2016, 9:45 pm

      Shop around. Just paid 1138 out tge door here in Pa. SHYDAS GUN SHOP. also Lanco Tactical has em for same price

  • Les October 12, 2015, 11:19 am

    Marketing. At least it doesn’t say “Grip Zone” on it.

  • Scotty Gunn October 12, 2015, 11:08 am

    It looks slick. That being said, $1428 msrp? Ouch.

  • Les October 12, 2015, 10:42 am

    Marketing. At least it doesn’t say “Grip Zone”.

  • Reed October 12, 2015, 10:24 am

    Have 3 different sigs. 220, 229, 239. All have never failed with every kind of fodder I could throw at them. I especially like the .40 cal in 229 & 239 for being able to insert 357 sig and 9mm barrels and shoot like you owned 3 different guns. I use the same .40 mags for all the calibers. I use the correct mags when cc, just in case. Except for the price, they would be my first choice every time.

  • Frank October 12, 2015, 10:08 am

    Wonder how this trigger compares to the Sig SRT? Other than that, can’t see a real need for another model just to add mods anyone can get done.

  • Mike October 12, 2015, 9:35 am

    Sweet looker and shoots tight. I want one

  • Mike October 12, 2015, 9:34 am

    Sweet looker and shoots tight. I want one

  • David October 12, 2015, 9:12 am

    I’d rather see a new P225 replacement, never should have discontinued that!

  • bob October 12, 2015, 8:20 am

    Looks to me like putting lipstick on a pig.

  • Mike K October 12, 2015, 8:16 am

    “Failure” and “Sig” are two words that simply don’t belong in the same sentence. I took two departments and many individual officers and deputies to Sigs and simply NEVER experienced ANY failures of ANY kind. And this is coming from a dyed in the wool 1911 guy. H&Ks, XDs, Glocks and many others are great guns but Sigs are the benchmark for quality and dependability. Short of loading an empty case in a magazine, we couldn’t figure out a way to do a malfunction drill. They just worked every damn time and put the bullet (any bullet in any case)exactly where you aimed it. As much as I love John Browning, if I could only have one gun, it would be a Sig.

    • Rick October 12, 2015, 1:41 pm

      Mike, not everyone’s experience with Sigs is the same as yours. It took me three Sig P220’s to find one that I could rely upon for duty carry. The first didn’t get 50 rounds through it before the take down lever and left grip panel broke. Sent it back to the factory, came back with feeding issues; got rid of it. Next P220 had feeding issues and hold open on the last shot; got rid of it. The last one made it through 500 rounds of test fire and I sent it to Grays Guns for an action job, it’s still running strong after five plus years and has my confidence.

      No matter what the brand all firearms are mechanical devices and are subject to failure, some by design others through neglect. Every brand has it’s fans, but none is exempt, not Sig, Glock, H&K, Beretta, Ruger or Smith and Wesson. I’ve seen all of these brands top of the line products fail often brand new out of the box.

    • dave October 12, 2015, 5:55 pm

      Well, I have owned 8 Sig Sauer pistols. Not SIG like they call themselves today (which they are not – not even the “Legend” P210 clone attempt is a real Swiss SIG) but Sig Sauer (designed by SIG and made by JP Sauer and Son in Germany). All of mine were made in West Germany by Sauer; some were Browning BDA’s, and the only Sig Sauer that I ever had issues with whatsoever was from a Sig Sauer American made 556 classic RIFLE. I have owned P220’s, a P225, 226’s, a P228, and a P230. One failure to feed. One. Out of thousands and thousands of rounds. No other breakages, stoppages, or misfires. None. I loaned one P220 in .45ACP to the Idaho State Police SWAT for new sidearm trials back in the mid-late 80’s. They used the hell out of it. No failures at all. That’s my experience with these handguns.I like the idea behind the Legion. I’d love to have that P229. Even so, Rick is right. No gun make or model is without flaw or fault and some, regardless of make, are just turds.

    • John Griffin October 20, 2015, 7:58 pm

      Sig Sauer mk25 best I have ever owned your right never jams it’s my carry gun.

  • Peter D October 12, 2015, 6:50 am

    I’d like to thank you for this enjoyable review, of what should prove to be an excellent carry pistol. The review was both easy and fun to read, and the photos were excellent! A couple of minor points crossed my mind. First if you wanted to wring to most accuracy out of this weapon, why not mount a 36 power scope with 1/8th. inch target dot and shoot from a ransom rest? Yes, a ridiculous statement. I’d much rather see the effectiveness of the open sights, used by a fairly competent shooter, shot offhand. In my mind, the only accuracy data I’m really interested in, is how the weapon performs, in the manner it was intended to be used. Next, regarding the ammunition used to test. The only one you tested that I’ve seen available in my area is the American Eagle. Here we generally see Federal Hydra-Shok, Hornady, Remington and Speer loadings. Perhaps a minor point, but one more to my interest. Again, thanks for an enjoyable and informative read!

  • graham October 12, 2015, 6:28 am

    All they had to do was make it SAO and they would have had a perfect gun.
    It would have joined my 220 and 226 in SAO.

    • Tom McHale October 12, 2015, 10:09 am

      They are making an SAO option, check the article above, will be available in November time frame.

    • JothaK October 12, 2015, 2:41 pm

      “All they had to do was make it SAO and they would have had a perfect gun.”

      “They” already do. It’s called a Glock 19, the gun that most on and off duty SF guys carry anyway.

  • Gregg Kielma October 12, 2015, 6:07 am

    When will the gun be available for purchase in the Bradenton, Florida 34219 area?

  • Steve October 12, 2015, 4:41 am

    Sure would like to help you but i have two sigs, 238 & 938. Never once had a miss fire. I find that hard to believe as i shoot minimum once a month. Best guns i have ever owned.

    • Mike Workman October 12, 2015, 6:41 pm

      Ditto. And they are so easy to hide. I can put one on each side of my leather vest without bulging. They are so light, I hardly notice them. Plus, they operate so slickly, I never think of having a mifire. The night sights are a major plus that don’t comes standard on most handguns. Same as on my P227, the go-to-war gun. The night sights rule the dark.

  • Cznut October 12, 2015, 2:53 am

    A CZ custom shop 9mm will cost less and still out shoot a sig legion

  • Mr. James October 6, 2015, 9:19 pm

    Having some extreme desirers to buy into the Sig line of auto loading hand wares. I’m a huge fan of H&K USP and favour there newer striker line but something has signalled me towards Sig. What is it that has changed in me ?.Some outside suggestions from users who have had explainable failures are being sought..

    • Randy October 14, 2015, 6:52 pm

      I can’t help either. I have a 226, 229, 239, and a 320. The only problem I have ever had is with my big thumb touching the slide lock and stopping the lock back on the last shot. I moved my thumb 1/16″ and no more problems. No fails to feed, stove pipes, or fail to extract. NOTHING. This looks like a sweet gun, but I will wait on the .40.

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