We Shoot the New .40 S&W XD-S from Springfield Armory

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Today–January 8th–Springfield is giving 5 away.

To enter the contest, click on this link: https://1950.springfield-armory.com/

I find the XD-S to be the perfect size for easy concealed carry.

I find the XD-S to be the perfect size for easy concealed carry.

Check out the XD-S .40 at Springfield Armory: http://www.springfield-armory.com/xd-s-series/

Buy one on GunsAmerica:https://www.gunsamerica.com/Search.aspx?T=xd-s

With this new XD-S chambered in .40 caliber, Springfield Armory has covered the bases with the most popular self-defense calibers for semi-automatic pistols. Originally available in 9mm and .45 ACP, the new .40 S&W model provides an interesting option for law enforcement and concealed carry users alike.

“While customers appreciate the choice between 9mm and .45 ACP in the XD-S lineup, we wanted to make things easier for our law enforcement users,” says Dennis Reese, Springfield Armory CEO. “Many departments are standardized on the .40 caliber, and we wanted to make it easier to choose the XD-S as a backup to their primary service weapon. Besides, many concealed carry customers prefer to carry the same caliber as their local law enforcement officers, so they’ll appreciate having the option of a .40 caliber model too.”

Springfield Armory XD-S .40 caliber, right side.

Springfield Armory XD-S .40 caliber, right side.

I’ve used the 9mm and .45 ACP versions – a lot. In fact, I wrote a book about these two guns shortly after they hit the market. So how does the XD-S .40 caliber stack up? Let’s take a look.

Springfield Armory XD-S .40 caliber, left side.

Springfield Armory XD-S .40 caliber, left side.

What’s In The Box?

The basic packaging of the new XD-S® .40 caliber includes the gun, two magazines, one additional backstrap insert and the usual gun lock and owners materials.

The basic gun includes a small hard case with lockable catches, a flat base and extended magazine, grip size adjustment and the standard gun lock.

The basic gun includes a small hard case with lockable catches, a flat base and extended magazine, grip size adjustment and the standard gun lock.

One of the magazines has a flush base to minimize overall size. This one holds six rounds of .40 caliber plus one in the chamber. With the flush magazine installed, I can fit my middle and ring fingers on the grip along with exactly one-half of my pinky. Unlike a slightly shorter grip where I have to fold the pinky underneath, I get good support.

The second included magazine is called the Mid-Mag. It’s about ¾-inch longer and adds a seventh round. It comes with a magazine sleeve, so the longer magazine also serves as a grip extension. In the “nice touch” department, Springfield Armory includes a second sleeve whose profile matches the alternate backstrap insert. Whichever backstrap size you choose, there’s a matching grip sleeve, so the extended grip is seamless.

Springfield Armory includes an additional sleeve with the extended magazine that mates perfectly with the second grip size adjustment backstrap.

Springfield Armory includes an additional sleeve with the extended magazine that mates perfectly with the second grip size adjustment backstrap.

A short, one-notch Picatinny rail segment is there in case you want to mount a light or laser.

A short, one-notch Picatinny rail segment is there in case you want to mount a light or laser.

The gun comes in a small plastic hard case and has dual sliding latches, both equipped with padlock holes. Technically, it’s good to go per TSA rules, but the case is not designed to be “break it into pieces and steal what’s inside” proof, so for travel I would invest in a theft-resistant case.

The Quick Tour

The XD-S is a svelte gun. At just 0.9 inches wide, this model is shockingly easy to conceal in any of the available calibers. As you might guess, it’s a single-stack design – that explains its 6+1 and 7+1 capacity.

Overall length is 6.25 inches while height from the bottom of the flush magazine to the top of the sights is 4.25 inches. It weighs 22 ounces empty, so it’s not the lightest compact on the market. That’s one of the benefits of the XD-S however. As we’ll discuss in a bit, these are surprisingly shootable guns for their size.

Like a 1911, all XD-S pistols come with a standard grip safety.

Like a 1911, all XD-S pistols come with a standard grip safety.

The magazine release button is present on both sides - no need to swap it from left to right.

The magazine release button is present on both sides – no need to swap it from left to right.

The magazine release buttons are fully ambidextrous, meaning there’s already one on each side – you don’t have to reverse it if you’re left-handed. The slide lock lever is on the left side only, but that’s an administrative control so no matter. Like other XD models, the XD-S .40 caliber has a grip safety that depresses on the assumption of a proper firing grip, kind of like a 1911. Combined with the trigger leaf insert safety, this gun is exceptionally unlikely to “go off” by surprise. That can only happen if you grip it, depressing the grip safety, AND intentionally pull the trigger. With this kind of redundancy, it should be a comforting concealed carry configuration. I have no qualms about carrying this gun in any type of proper holster. In fact, I’ve been carrying this one frequently using a Galco Pocket Protector holster. The slim profile makes it a great pocket gun. We’ll get into some of the carry methods I tested with this gun in a minute.

The barrel is 3.3 inches long, and sight radius is 5.5 inches. The fiber optic tube up front jumps into view with little if any distraction from the low-profile combat rear sight. The notch in the rear sight is flanked by two white dots. By the way, it’s easy to swap out the fiber optic tube. Using a lighter and sharp knife, you can remove the installed red tube and replace it with green if you like.

The XD-S .40 caliber includes a short, single-slot Picatinny rail up front in case you want to attach a light, laser, or bayonet if you’re feeling particularly Rambo-like.

Trigger

The trigger on my sample XD-S .40 had almost exactly ¼” of take-up with 2 ½ pounds of pressure followed by a constant pressure break sequence. The trigger broke every time right at 7 ½ pounds of pressure. The feel is almost entirely grit-free, and the pressure up to the break point is smooth.

Cocking serrations are on the rear of the slide only.

Cocking serrations are on the rear of the slide only.

I find the 7 ½ pound trigger weight ideal for a gun like this. It’s smooth enough to fire accurately with ease and heavy enough to provide an extra measure of safety for deep concealment carry. Obviously, this is a user issue, but I prefer a heavier trigger on a gun I might carry in a pocket holster. The tight confines inside a pocket during a draw make it more difficult to absolutely and positively avoid contact between a finger and the trigger. But that’s just my preference.

Carrying the XD-S .40

I found this gun to be insanely easy to carry concealed. Almost all of the credit for that award goes to its incredibly thin profile. At just .9 inches thick, it’s one of the most comfortable handguns to carry inside the waistband. The small overall dimensions also allow it to work in a pocket holsters, depending of course on the pocket in question. I found myself using three different carry configurations with this little portable gun.

The CrossBreed SnapSlide is a great option for OWB carry. Note the high positioning of the gun relative to the beltline.

The CrossBreed SnapSlide is a great option for OWB carry. Note the high positioning of the gun relative to the beltline.

My most common carry scenario for the XD-S .40 was inside the waistband using an N82 Tactical Original holster. This design features a large back panel constructed of suede, neoprene, and oil-tanned leather. The suede layer is on the inside for comfort but also provides stability from friction. The neoprene acts as a barrier to keep sweat away from your gun and oil away from your body. The gun side is made from leather for durability and smoothness of draw. This holster is ridiculously comfortable with the XD-S. The back panel is large enough to prevent the gun grip texture from contacting your sensitive side parts and the overall thin package disappears with even a tighter cover garment. I highly recommend this combination.

For pocket carry, I’ve been using the Galco Pocket Protector holster. First, ALWAYS use a holster when carrying in your pocket. OK, rant over. The Pocket Protector features a flat and wide base to keep the XD-S oriented vertically even through much of the weight is up high in the full magazine. The rough side out leather provides enough friction to keep the holster in your pocket during the draw, although that is aided by a hook designed into the leather wing section. The hook is designed to catch on the inside of your pocket, thereby preventing the holster from coming out with the gun. The top is reinforced inside to allow for easy gun insertion. Bottom line? This holster works great with the XD-S. Always test your pockets to make sure that the pocket mouth is large enough to draw with a decent firing grip.

The last configuration I’ve been using is a CrossBreed Holsters SnapSlide molded for the XD-S with a Crimson Trace Laserguard. What I like about this one is the very high mount relative to the beltline. That combined with the short overall length of the XD-S makes for a very easy to conceal the gun, even when carried outside the pants. The large leather backing surface and belt loops separated by six inches make for a very stable rig. Of course, you can order a SnapSlide configured for an XD-S without the Laserguard too.

The Crimson Trace Laserguard is designed specifically for the XD-S. Note how the activation button integrates with the grip texture.

The Crimson Trace Laserguard is designed specifically for the XD-S. Note how the activation button integrates with the grip texture.

I installed this Crimson Trace Laserguard for testing. It worked like a champ and the green laser was clearly visible in daylight conditions at my outdoor range.

I installed this Crimson Trace Laserguard for testing. It worked like a champ and the green laser was clearly visible in daylight conditions at my outdoor range.

One more comment: If you wear pants with cargo pockets, check out the Recluse Holsters TS Cargo model. It’s specifically designed for extra large pockets and will prevent the gun from falling over sideways inside the larger pocket interior. A clever front panel completely hides the outline of your handgun. It’s excellent.

While I didn’t test this configuration, the XD-S would make an excellent choice for ankle carry. The low overall height from the base of the magazine to the top of the slide will make this perfectly compatible with a good ankle holster. I’m not crazy about ankle carry for my primary gun, but the small size of the XD-S would make it an excellent backup option. For you law enforcement officers out there who may be standardized on .40 S&W for your service gun, this might be a good ammo-compatible backup option to consider.

Shooting The XD-S .40 And The Recoil Olympics

Felt recoil is a pretty subjective measure. Generally speaking, using a similar gun, I find that the .40 S&W feels snappier than a .45 ACP, which tends to feel like more of a “push” than a “jolt” to me. Of course, 9mm is tamer than either of the larger bore options.

I tested several common self-defense loads with widely varying bullet weights.

I tested several common self-defense loads with widely varying bullet weights.

As I write this, I happen to have (nearly) matching XD-S pistols in all three calibers. I liked the original 9mm and .45 ACP XD-S pistols so much I bought one of each. I figured this was a great opportunity to report on the subjective felt recoil differences between all three. I shot all three using their flush magazines as I felt that was the most likely concealed carry combination. All three models come with extended magazines that offer more surface area and probably help mitigate the “felt” part of recoil.

The subjective part of this is predictable. The 9mm model is a breeze to shoot well. Recoil is light, and the gun is large enough not to be jumpy in the hand. The .45 ACP is surprisingly shootable. The slower and heavier bullet generates some kick, but it’s more of a push than a sharp snap. The new XD-S .40 caliber feels like it has more recoil than the other two, but I suspect that’s a result of the velocity of the recoil impulse – you feel the force in a shorter amount of time.

The captive dual recoil springs not only help with reliable function, but tame recoil as well.

The captive dual recoil springs not only help with reliable function, but tame recoil as well.

I found that ammo choice made a big difference. The Barnes TAC-XPD ammo with its 140-grain bullet was very comfortable to shoot – there was no sharp kick at all, and it felt closer to a 9mm than a the other .40 rounds. The Speer Gold Dot 180-grain was also surprisingly mild, feeling more like the slow push of a .45 ACP fired from an XD-S. The Winchester PDX1 round had the most felt recoil of the bunch due to its velocity and bullet weight combination.

The rear sight is serrated to minimize glare in the sight picture.

The rear sight is serrated to minimize glare in the sight picture.

The front fiber optic sight is red, but you can easily change it out in a few minutes with a knife and lighter.

The front fiber optic sight is red, but you can easily change it out in a few minutes with a knife and lighter.

So that’s how it felt to me. Doing some fancy math, I calculated the recoil energy of each gun with a representative load for its caliber. Keep in mind that foot-pounds of recoil energy is just one component of what recoil “feels” like and that recoil energy varies with each bullet weight, velocity, and powder charge weight combination for any given gun. Here’s what I figured:

XD-S 9mm: 5.10 foot-pounds (124-grain bullet at 1,150 fps)

XD-S .45 ACP: 8.15 foot-pounds (230-grain bullet at 790 fps)

XD-S .40 S&W: 6.92 foot-pounds (180-grain bullet at 920 fps)

The bottom line is that ammunition choice matters. If you go with an XD-S .40, try some different types of ammo with different bullet weight and velocity combinations to see what you like, and more importantly, what you can control.

The takedown lever rotates up when the slide is locked back. This allows removal of the slide, barrel and recoil spring assembly.

The takedown lever rotates up when the slide is locked back. This allows removal of the slide, barrel and recoil spring assembly.

Accuracy And Velocity Testing

The XD-S .40 caliber features a 3.3-inch barrel, so I wanted to see what type of velocity I would get from a variety of self-defense loads. I chose these four: Hornady Critical Duty 175-grain, Barnes TAC-XPD 140-grain, Speer Gold Dot 180-grain, and Winchester PDX1 165-grain. To get average velocity figures, I set up a Shooting Chrony Beta Master Chronograph 15 feet down range and calculated average velocities for each load.

AmmunitionAverage Velocity (feet per second)
Hornady Critical Duty 175-grain956.6
Barnes TAC-XPD 140-grain966.9
Speer Gold Dot 180-grain922.1
Winchester PDX1 165-grain949.3

For accuracy testing, I mounted a Crimson Trace Laserguard to the XD-S. The Laserguard is a custom-built unit specifically for the XD-S that attaches to the front rail and connects to an instinctive activation button on the front side of the grip via a trigger guard liner. The laser gave me a near perfect sight picture on targets placed 15 yards down range. For each ammo type, I fired multiple five-shot groups and calculated an average group diameter.

AmmunitionAverage Group Size (five-shots at 15 yards)
Hornady Critical Duty 175-grain1.855 inches
Barnes TAC-XPD 140-grain1.95 inches
Speer Gold Dot 180-grain1.265 inches
Winchester PDX1 165-grain1.355 inches

I got the best group of the outing with the Winchester PDX1 Defender loads. Those left a single, irregular hole with all five holes interconnected. The Speer Gold Dot 180-grain load turned in a single hole four-shot group with one flyer. What was interesting was that point of impact was consistent for all four ammo types with the average group centers being within an inch of each other. At self-defense ranges, your choice of ammo isn’t going to be a factor in terms of the sights matching up with the point of impact.

I got consistent groups with all ammunition tested, but this five-shot group of Winchester PDX1 Defender was the tightest of the day.

I got consistent groups with all ammunition tested, but this five-shot group of Winchester PDX1 Defender was the tightest of the day.

Closing Thoughts

The interesting thing about Springfield Armory’s XD-S pistols is that they are well suited to serve as a primary carry gun and as a backup to a larger pistol. Most compact guns in 9mm, .40 S&W, and .45 ACP are notoriously un-fun to shoot. Small and light generally does not go well with heavier recoil of full-power calibers. I’ve always found the XD-S platform to be surprisingly comfortable and controllable – in other words, easy to shoot well. It’s big enough to handle, but small enough for easy concealment.

A chamber status indicator can be seen and felt if a round is present and chambered.

A chamber status indicator can be seen and felt if a round is present and chambered.

Chamber indicator when a round is loaded.

Chamber indicator when a round is loaded.

The XD-S .40 S&W model is certainly snappier than the 9mm, and feels a little bit “sharper” in terms of felt recoil, but that’s the case with any handgun chambered in that caliber. Physics is physics after all. If you feel comfortable with a .40 for it’s larger diameter and more capacity than the .45 ACP, take a look. The XD-S is a great carry gun, and now you have your choice of 9mm, .40 S&W, and .45 ACP.

Today–January 8th–Springfield is giving 5 away.

To enter the contest, click on this link: https://1950.springfield-armory.com/

{ 28 comments… add one }
  • Gabriel Ruiz October 21, 2016, 2:09 pm

    like the pistle

  • Dan March 8, 2016, 7:08 pm

    I was just comparing the specs on the XD-s in .40 S&W with the Ruger SR40c.
    XD-s .40 = 6/7 Rounds, 3.3″ Barrel, 6.3″ Length, .9″ Width, 4.4″ Height and 22oz.
    SR40c = 9/15 Rounds, 3.5″ Barrel, 6.85″ Length, 1.1 Width, 4.61″ Height, and 23.4oz. (Width measured to outside of ambidextrous safety levers is 1.27″)

    They seem to sell for about the same price. Any opinions?

  • BillyDee February 21, 2016, 7:21 am

    I just received the xds 40 and did put 30 rounds through it and I loved it. Hit everything I shot at within 22 yards with ease. This will be my edc for sure. I will find a IWB holster and thinking of a laser in the future but the way it shoots right now it really doesn’t seem necessary. I strongly recommend the handgun and the recoil isn’t really that bad very manageable. The XDS is a SUCCESS. Get it you wont be disappointed.

    • brad December 1, 2016, 11:43 am

      ALWAYS get a laser for your EDC. Always.
      If you have to use it, you will probably not have time to acquire a proper sight picture.

  • Cabin 1 January 11, 2016, 9:00 pm

    I’ve enjoyed my Springfield line for many years. I was first sold on the Springfields because of the added grip safety for conceal carry. Been carrying for years and own or have owned many different types of hand guns. Everyone will have their own preferences when it comes to brands, size, features, etc.. I’ve never had any issues with my xd’s or XDS since purchasing them. I shoot the XDS 45 on a regular basis (every other week end) and prefer it’s accuracy and comfort level to other guns. Easy to conceal, smooth trigger and action and eats anything I feed eat. My advice to the gun snobs is actually go out and shoot one. If your a heavy metal 1911 guy then stick with the 1911, great gun by the way but too heavy for me to pack around all day and forget an ankle holster for a 1911. The XDS serves it’s purpose very well for me and my family. I would like the XDS in 40 since I have had good service from the 9mm and 45 acp.

  • burrga January 11, 2016, 5:14 pm

    It is hard to believe in this day and age that we still have this anti-‘plastic’ gun mentality.The Springfield XD series performs very well in all phases and testing. Where these posters are getting this ‘Springfield is crap’ nonsense from is anyone’s guess -fan-boy or’ my daddy told me so’ stuff. These are fine guns and will perform as advertised. For those of you who MUST have a steel frame, go for it. No one is forcing you to buy anything.

  • Larry January 11, 2016, 3:06 pm

    I have my Beretta Storm sub compact in 40 caliber resting in a pocket holster in the RF pocket of my jeans right now. And it’s 10 plus 1, not 6 or 7 plus 1. There is negligible recoil as there is a lot of steel in it & therefore weight. Try it. You might like it.

  • Don Bloomquist January 11, 2016, 1:17 pm

    I have been shopping around for a 9 MM that will be a protection piece for my wife and I. I have owned and shot all kinds of handguns my favorite being a military 45. The question I have is about the slide on most of these carry guns Is very hard to cycle for old hands or woman with old hands. I understand the mechanics/ trigger /and recoil but it seems to me that having a bad time cycling the slide in not a very safe measure at the wrong time when you life could possibly be on the line. If there is something missing or is there a correction to be made please inform me, Thank You.

  • Hank Goldin January 11, 2016, 11:42 am

    I’m in Saint Augustine FL 32095 no one has any stock of any of your guns, you have 1 dealer ACE doesn’t carry anything of your’s .

    How can I became a stocking dealer?

    • Paul Helinski January 11, 2016, 12:22 pm

      Well first you’d have to be a dealer. Ask your dealer to order one from his distributor.

  • Michael January 11, 2016, 10:52 am

    Can you put the slide and barrel from the 40 on the 45 frame.
    I have the XDS 45 and I like it very much.

    Are they the same?
    I have a Glock 27 with barrels in 9,357, and 40. It uses the same slide.

  • Tom H January 11, 2016, 10:25 am

    I carry a XDS .45 everyday. The size, weight, is perfect for conceled carry. I am looking at picking up a 9mm and now think I may get the 40 S&W too. I have no problems using the extended magazine for carry . The gun works that well. I had a S&W in 40 and was surprised at the snappiness, my word. It wasn’t bad and I do miss the gun, kinda, my son has it now.
    When I got my .45 it came with a paddle holster. On the holster it was marked for .45, 40 and 9. Will that holster fit the new 40 xds? Just wondering.
    Great article, thanks for bringing this to us.

  • William Stewart January 11, 2016, 9:20 am

    I will find it hard for this gun (although I’m dying to buy one!) to beat either of my Springfield Compact Range Officers in 9mm and 45acp, but would love to write about my experience after I acquire one of these beauties!

  • Phil January 11, 2016, 8:59 am

    I have considered Springfield for a longtime, but wanted more magazine capacity. I finally bought a Springfield XD .357 because opf the 10+1 capacity, and have upgraded to the optional 12 rd magazine. I have fired the XD-9mm and the XD-45 cal but the .357 in my opinion is a better weapon for my shooting. I get a terrific pattern with it and would probably buy a 45 caliber if it had a greater magazine capacity!

  • Alan Petrokonis January 11, 2016, 8:18 am

    I have the XDS in 45. It was subject to recall. Very Poor communications and customer service from Springfield. On the positive, it is very easy to carry and is comparably accurate to other firearms in it’s class. But , enough of these striker actions and plastic frames. Shoot one every week and see how it performs in a few months. SIG P 227 and HK USP, a bit harder to conceal and more initial cost up front, but, I’m not trusting my life to poor customer service and questionable design….

    • buh January 11, 2016, 10:02 am

      good for you! glad to see others do the same thing I did. the xds is almost half it’s original sales price….. once word got out about how crappy it is.
      I learned my lesson and will never go back to springfield and why should I? far better guns are available, with far better customers service! worst in the business

      • Jim R January 11, 2016, 12:12 pm

        I no longer own the 2 XD`s that I foolishly bought. These guns are terrible and customer service is even worse.

      • miles huggins January 11, 2016, 11:14 pm

        Springfield customer service is better than most in my opinion s&w and taurus to name a few i think the bad c/s comment r from one recall on alot of guns with a minor issue they delt with and fixed and gave free mag on return not a springfield fanboy just being real my smiths are my favorites but customer service isnt why

      • Bowserb January 26, 2016, 7:29 am

        My experience with SA is the exact opposite. I’ve had questions answered by email overnight. When an accident broke the slide release on my XDM-45, I called and was told by a friendly voice, “We can send you the part, or I can email a FedEx shipping label.” No question of when it was bought or anything. I sent it in a FedEx box, and it was back in ten days. OTOH, like so many others with the famous Sig P227 14 round mag problem, I get rude and borderline insulting conversation from Sig Customer Service and “We can exchange the magazine, but you’ll have to provide proof of purchase with the magazine.” No free shipping. And that’s for a gun that costs half again as much as the XDM. On another matter Sig CS only offered to sell me more stuff. SA stepped up with the XDS issue. Sig is denying the 14-round mag problem. No sir. If you buy guns based on customer service, then SA is your company. Sig is at the bottom of my list.

        • Patt March 9, 2016, 2:45 pm

          I am with you on the XDs recall issue. My experience was painless and refreshing to be honest. I have purchased several of these in .45ACP and 9mm, and have sold a few. Even when a buyer wanted proof of recall repair, I simply shot an email/phone call to Springfield’s CS team, and within 24 hours had written proof of repair with date and stamp from Springfield. Beyond that, my wife has a Smith & Wesson M&P Shield in 9mm, but actually prefers to shoot/carry my XDs in .45ACP. She says the XDs, while a much larger round, does a much better job of compensating for recoil. She is quicker to acquire a new site picture and has better grouping at the range.

  • Gary B January 11, 2016, 3:32 am

    I have the XDS in 9 and 45. I have the Crimson Trace green Laser guard on the 9 and just ordered one of the Recluse holster you mentioned for the Crimson Trace gun. I have been pocket carrying my 45 in a RBKA leather pocket holster. I have a Galco Pocket Protector, but like the RBKA better for me. (It has a little leather claw or hook, fore and aft, so you can easily snag the holster and draw the gun, very spiffy)
    I just started carrying a XD45 Mod 2 instead of the XDS

  • Steve Sanquist January 9, 2016, 11:26 pm

    Do you know if the XDS .40 is Ca compliant.

    • Tom McHale January 10, 2016, 10:00 am

      My guess is no, as I think anything with a new spec or feature needs to be re-certified for the approved list. Can someone with more knowledge of the CA process chime in maybe?

      • Crunch Hardtack September 20, 2016, 9:21 am

        As for the .40 XDS being Ca. compliant, not sure, but I did see one for sale at Turner’s Outdoor at their Temecula branch in August. Felt great in the hand.

    • buh January 11, 2016, 10:31 am

      I know the xds .45 is illegal in ca. so the 40 probably is too. I dont know how you ca. shooters can stand living there. I won’t even visit anymore because of all the screwed up law they have now and are still coming out with. i’m a former san jose citizen and so happy I left!! but i should also thank ca., if i get into a gunfight, I hope it’s with ca. compliant guns, I will have a huge tactical advantage, and the bad guy will be dead before he can find his bullet button magazine tool. bad part is, you good guys have the same disadvantages.

    • Steve March 13, 2017, 5:26 pm

      Got my 40 on the 8th of march on the case that comes with it note’s NOT LEGAL IN COMMUNIST CALIFORNIA.

  • Robert J. Pickett Jr. January 8, 2016, 9:10 pm

    I would love to carry the pistol

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