Is It Okay to Look Down at Your Holster When Re-holstering?

Earlier this year we met up with Funker Tactical and Daniel Shaw in Wichita, Kansas to shoot some cool videos on guns, tactics and concealed carry philosophy.

In the video above, Shaw, a retired U.S. Marine Infantry Unit Leader, answers the question on whether it is really okay to look down while re-holstering a handgun.

{ 8 comments… add one }
  • Mike October 31, 2015, 7:18 am

    Respondents are conflating two distinct situations-the LEO holding at gunpoint must retain tactical control. The civilian is relinquishing tactical control to a legitimate authority or de-escalting from a mis-identified situation where tactical control is not an issue.

  • Bo Bolgiano October 30, 2015, 9:59 pm

    Be skilled in both options: and understand that it is a perishable skill. Look when you can (it is silly not to when safety permits) but be fully capable of reholstering while keeping full attention on a tactical matter at hand if need be.

  • Harry Lipp October 30, 2015, 7:52 am

    SETTLE DOWN THERE ONE jondarmes your opinion is appreciated but I pretty much disqualify you from any opinions you may have since truth be told you are a good honest simple tough looking Mall Cop. My so and his friends see you each time they attend the mall and there you go doing your job. But when was the last time you had to draw down and then reholster on some See’s Candy kid cause he will not leave the free sample line?

  • Jondarmes October 30, 2015, 4:32 am

    I am not a LEO, I am ex military, when I holster my weapon I have achieved complete control, or someone will lose a kneecap, at the very least.

  • Roger October 24, 2015, 1:48 am

    As a retired LEO that has worked some of the most violent areas of So. Calif. let me just say that when you are in a situation that you are holding a suspect at gun point and the occasion arises to have to reholster your weapon to take total control it would be a very dangerous time to take your eyes off of the suspect to look around to see where your holster is located.
    You had best to hell know where your gear is/are located.
    As a training officer being able to reholster WITH OUT looking was one of my requirements.

  • Rob62 October 12, 2015, 4:14 am

    I have no idea what the article will say. All I have read so far is the headline. But I will go on record and say that of course it’s OK to look down when re-holstering your pistol. Holstering the gun is generally only done once the thread has been eliminated. Or the thread is gone. So in that context why not take a brief glimps to see whether or not something may interfere with the gun holstering or causing a negligent discharge while trying to holster ?! I have given this issue much thought previous to coming to my decision, so will now read what the article says (watch video).

    Just watched the vid. It’s good to know I am not the only one who feels the way I do.

    • MG November 2, 2015, 7:53 pm

      I agree with you and the video.
      When I was doing cop stuff, we learned “no look” holstering — just in case we had to due to do so during non-“Code 4” situations…like, you have to holster your gun (and snap down) so you can handcuff someone.
      That said, there have been numerous incidents where clothing has gotten caught on the trigger as it’s being pressed into place and the gun has discharged.
      We had one guy trying to holster his Glock that had a tactical light on it without looking. The light kept getting hung up on the front of the holster. As he kept trying and trying, he eventually worked his finger into the trigger guard during the effort, mashed down “one more time” to seat it, and it discharged at an angle down and to the rear almost hitting the guy standing to his right and behind.

  • Rob62 October 12, 2015, 4:10 am

    I have no idea what the article will say. All I have read so far is the headline. But I will go on record and say that of course it’s OK to look down when re-holstering your pistol. Holstering the gun is generally only done once the thread has been eliminated. Or the thread is gone. So in that context why not take a brief glimps to see whether or not something may interfere with the gun holstering or causing a negligent discharge while trying to holster ?! I have given this issue much thought previous to coming to my decision, so will now read what the article says.

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