Israel Defense Forces IWI Tavor Review

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The actual IDF gun. IWI is replicating them in the US, and you can buy one. Blonde not included.

The actual IDF gun. IWI is replicating them in the US, and you can buy one. Blonde not included.

The Tavor is a rifle that has been in the public’s eyes for a few years now. It is admired for its military service with the Israeli Defense Forces, as well as its advanced function and innovative form. Since its initial fielding in 2003 this rifle has been an object of desire for many American shooters. We all wanted a Tavor but couldn’t get one on U.S. soil; luckily IWI recognized the demand and developed a few new versions for the US market. There were some minor changes, but we got our Tavors. Yet for the enthusiast like me, the flat top SAR model just wasn’t enough; I wanted my gun to look and work just like the IDF’s Ctar. I wanted the closest thing I could get to the gun that serves Israel so well. I wanted the IWI Tavor SAR IDF16.

The new IDF Tavor.

The new IDF Tavor. More barrel. Less select-fire. No blonde.

SPECS

  • Caliber    5.56 NATO
  • Action    Semi-auto
  • Operating System    Closed rotating bolt, long gas stroke on piston head
  • Barrel Material    Cold hammer forged, CrMoV, chrome lined
  • Barrel Length    16 ½”
  • Overall Length    26 ⅛”
  • Weight    8.5 lbs.
  • Rifling    Right hand, 6 grooves, 1:7 inch twist
  • Stock Color    Black
  • Stock Type    Reinforced polymer bullpup configuration
  • Sights    Meprolight MEPRO 21 Reflex Sight plus folding front sight (blade) with Tritium insert and rear sight (aperture)
  • MSRP – $2,599

The IDF16 is Americanized version of the original Tavor fielded by the Israeli Defense forces. It has had a couple of slight modifications to make it comply with regulations set up for the U.S. market. The 16.5″ barrel keeps it from being an SBR, and it is semiautomatic only. Still, the gun remains true to the fit, form, and function of the IDF’s rifle of choice.

The rocker behind the mag drops the bolt.

The rocker behind the mag drops the bolt.

The gun comes from the factory ready for service. Nothing about this gun is under built. Nothing is lacking in form or function. Every inch of this rifle serves a purpose; there is no wasted space to speak of.

All of its parts are built to Israeli military standard specifications and coated in corrosion resistant finishes to ensure longevity. The body of the rifle is made of high strength impact resistant polymer which enables you to snug up on a rifle without fear of hot or cold metal, and no sharp edges or strange angles.

Sitting atop the Tavor is an optimized set of iron sights that fold away neatly, and the rifle is topped by a Mepro-21 reflex sight. The Iron sights are fully adjustable and illuminated with a tritium insert making them usable in low light (and even no light) situations. For those accustomed to the robust iron sights found in the AR-15 aftermarket, the Tavor’s sights will seem thin. But they stand up to the abuse and, especially on the IDF model, are meant purely as a backup.

The Mepro-21 reflex sight is a non-magnified optic that utilizes both fiber optics and tritium to give an illuminated option that requires no batteries or on/off switches. Always on, always ready, the Mepro-21 is a great optic with more than combat accurate capabilities. With the addition of a Mepro MX3 magnifier, the Mepro-21 would be easily capable of hits on man-sized targets out to 300 meters.

The gun is easy enough to field strip.

The gun is easy enough to field strip.

The rifle works off of a long stroke gas piston system that keeps the action clean, and makes the rifle supremely reliable. It’s a bold claim to say that the Tavor is more reliable than the competition. I will say that this isn’t my first Tavor. I’ve never experienced a jam in the thousands of rounds I’ve sent down range in the Tavors I’ve shot and owned. The guns keep working no matter the diet or conditions they are put subjected to.

There’s another benefit to the Tavor. With a little bit of bench time (and a left handed bolt) the gun can be completely transformed into southpaw rifle. The safety, charging handle, and ejection can all be flipped to the opposite side of the rifle.

Shooting the bullpup

Shooting the Tavor will feel odd for those new to the platform. Because of the bullpup design, it takes time and training to become comfortable with the rifle. Bullpups have always presented a challenge in ergonomics; historically they have always been quick into action but slow in manipulation. The Tavor breaks most of that mold, but it still requires training and the acceptance of the set-backs bullpups often suffer from. Reloads will be slower than on your AR-15. With regular, rigorous practice, you can pick up speed.

There's not much room on the front of the gun for hand holds, and the high-C grip is all but impossible.

There’s not much room on the front of the gun for hand holds, and the high-C grip is all but impossible.

Once you get used to the new manual of arms and the ergonomics, the gun begins to shine. It has a 16.5 inch barrel and an overall length of 26.5 inches. The gun is compact, close to SBR lengths with out the hassle of tax stamps.This length will keep the rounds moving at 3,000 FPS or better, exactly like the AR carbines it’s designed to replace.

The IDF model tested for this article presented a challenge. We typically like to crunch numbers and compile some basic accuracy data. Shooting tight groups with a non-magnified reflex sight is not really in my wheelhouse. At 100 meters I got results close to the six inch mark. With a magnified optic, I am sure the groups would stay much tighter at the longer ranges. Accuracy is also restricted by the Tavor’s trigger, which breaks at 11 pounds, and the large reticle of the Mepro-21. One tip for anyone shooting the IDF Model is to use the top of the triangle as a more precise point of aim. Covering a torso-sized target at 100 yards is easy to do quickly, but if you are looking for more precise shot placement, focus on the tip of the triangle.

From 100 yards, the reticle is too large for surgical work.

From 100 yards, the reticle is too large for surgical work.

Use the tip of the triangle and you will see better results. This does require sighting the optic in correctly.

Use the tip of the triangle and you will see better results. This does require sighting the optic in correctly.

Moving in closer to the targets, the rifle begins to come into its own. Bullpups were designed for close quarters. The Tavor is no exception. It points naturally. The majority of the weight is toward the rear of the rifle the shooter, which keeps you from fatiguing as quickly. The weight distribution enables the shooter to engage targets with one hand. The gun remains effective while the left hand is busy opening doors, or grabbing magazines. Its short overall-length makes maneuvering around obstacles as easy as staying an arms length away. I’m 5’8”. If I am farther than an arms length away from a target, I can bring the rifle up and engage without backing up.

From 100 yards, the Tavor is effective. A maginified optic could help bring these groups in. The gun has far more long range potential than the optic.

From 100 yards, the Tavor is effective. A maginified optic could help bring these groups in. The gun has far more long range potential than the optic.

From 25 meters.

From 25 meters.

The rifle hits the mark with practical accuracy. At close quarters, the heavy trigger and large reticle seem perfectly natural. This has been a contentious argument for some of us at GunsAmerica. We’ve all had some experience with the Tavor. While everyone respects the rifle, some wouldn’t own one without a new trigger. Others like the feel of the stock trigger and see its heavy pull as kind of a psuedo-safety because you really have to pull the trigger to fire. The idea goes something like this: in close quarters scenarios, where you assess targets rapidly, a heavy pull could keep you from reflexively pulling the trigger the moment a (potentially innocuous) target presents itself.

I find the trigger to be obscenely heavy, almost to a point where it becomes counter productive. I’d like to see a factory trigger pack from IWI for non-Military/LE customers that gives users who don’t require battlefield reliability a factory option. But there are great aftermarket options from Geisselle and Timney, so it is an easy fix should you want to fix it.

This lever here at the back of the hand drops the magazine (in this case, a 9mm mag--more on that in a moment).

This lever here at the back of the hand drops the magazine (in this case, a 9mm mag–more on that in a moment).

Moving past the trigger for a moment…. Let’s get back to the ergonomics. Give this rifle to a new shooter who has no experience on the AR platform and he would find little to complain about. Anyone familiar with the FS2000, or a Styer AUG will appreciate the gun for how easy it is to use the controls. The Tavor is simply the most practical Bullpup on the market, but that doesn’t mean the rifle is flawless.

The position of the magazine release behind the shooter’s hand requires that you use an unorthodox slight-of-hand to drop the magazine, or remove the magazine with your support hand. It is easy enough to learn the drill, but not as easy as it is on an AR-15, where you push a button with your trigger finger and give the gun a little flip.

9mm

For this review, I requested that IWI send the 9mm conversion kit as well. Converting the rifle in to a pistol caliber carbine takes right around 15 minuets to complete and is easy enough that even the novice should be able to do it.

The 9mm conversion kit.

The 9mm conversion kit.

Once you’ve mastered the 5.56, the 9mm is an easy switch. Almost every detail remains the same. The 9mm carbine has the same trigger pull, weight, and manual of arms.

The 9mm feeds from modified Colt SMG magazines, and ran flawlessly. It is an improvement over most pistol caliber carbines. As the last round is fired, the bolt locks to the rear. The 9mm mag drops free. The beveled mag well makes reloads easy.

Accuracy with the 9mm conversion was more than combat effective; a 5 shot group supported from 25 meters gave one ragged hole in the paper. Groups were consistent, and held right around 1 to 1.5 inches.

The 9mm conversion kit turns the Tavor into a viable pistol caliber carbine, but it is really meant as a training tool. Once the conversion is complete, you can train with your Tavor with 9mm instead of 5.56. It would be easier on your wallet, and easier on steel targets.

The 9mm conversion kit comes in at $900, and gives you a low cost option when it comes to ammunition. If you are a high volume shooter this kit may just be worth its high price tag.

Price tag

The IDF16 has an MSRP of $2,599. It is selling closer to $2,200. And the IDF model will clearly appeal to the collector. For students of contemporary military history, the IDF16 will speak for itself.

I think the Tavor is a great solution for shooters looking for a gun they can travel with, train with, and carry. It fits under the bench of your truck, or in a discreet carry bag. Of all of the full sized carbines, the Tavor may be the easiest to hide in plain sight. It will appeal to anyone looking for a battle ready rifle right out of the box. It is practical, tested, and ready for any task you throw at it.

The 9mm conversion requires a few basic tools.

The 9mm conversion requires a few basic tools.

Here you can see how the optic mates with the barrel and not the receiver.

Here you can see how the optic mates with the barrel and not the receiver.

Transferring the optic to the 9mm barrel is easy enough.

Transferring the optic to the 9mm barrel is easy enough.

The 9mm mag block slides into the existing mag well.

The 9mm mag block slides into the existing mag well.

The new mag, and a new shell deflector.

The new mag, and a new shell deflector.

The converted Tavor looks strange, but it works well.

The converted Tavor looks strange, but it works well.

9mm accuracy is solid.

9mm accuracy is solid.

Keep the shooting hand clear of the mag release.

Keep the shooting hand clear of the mag release.

The Tavor.

The Tavor.

The offset light makes it even more effective at night, and for home defense.

The offset light makes it even more effective at night, and for home defense.

With the A*B Arms rail section below the barrel, you have even more space to add on extras.

With the A*B Arms rail section below the barrel, you have even more space to add on extras.

With the wide triangle reticle, the IDF16 is hardly a bench gun.

With the wide triangle reticle, the IDF16 is hardly a bench gun.

The iron sights pop up out of the frame.

The iron sights pop up out of the frame.

The trigger pack is easily removed and replaced with drop-ins from Geissele or Timney.

The trigger pack is easily removed and replaced with drop-ins from Geissele or Timney.

The weight of the Tavor is centered near the rear, which makes holding it on target much easier.

The weight of the Tavor is centered near the rear, which makes holding it on target much easier.

Mags drop free when the back of your hand hits this lever in front of the mag.

Mags drop free when the back of your hand hits this lever in front of the mag.

Ejection happens here, over your arm.

Ejection happens here, over your arm.

The XXX on top. It is a large sight, but incredibly easy to use.

The Mepro21 on top mounts to the barrel. It is a large sight, but incredibly easy to use.

{ 64 comments… add one }
  • breck August 4, 2016, 11:08 pm

    hahahahahahahahhahahahahhahaha

  • Thomas Perkins February 10, 2016, 1:37 am

    The Tavor is very well design rifle for Israel defense forces ,But I believe it could be much better to save many Israel soldiers lives and be especially helpful to Israel special forces groups ! The forward part of the rail not being use could be mounted a fold down swivel viewer ,that click into viewing position ! The fold down viewer screen will not block regular sight ! The camera lens be mounted under barrel just behind muzzle. Have a special forward grip to mode of operation one lock one swivel with electronic trigger turn operational when viewer flip up . To aim use one hand on butt of rifle ,while looking though target viewer and depressing electronic trigger ,with swivel forward grip no awkward hand positions ! This would turn the Tavor into a half corner shot ,to detect ambushes,to shoot around corners,walls,windows ,doors without fully exposing the body. I believe to make it more a sporting rifle ,target,blinking rifle and for more penetration to have tavor 260 mm with something like 300 savage cartridge ! I hope some Israel military wizard can make this dream come true to save many Israel soldiers lives Thanks for listening

  • Fred August 12, 2015, 12:01 pm

    I just bought the 18″ for 1499.00 plus tax.

  • Mikey February 11, 2015, 7:59 pm

    “The weight of the Tavor is centered near the rear, which makes holding it on target much easier. ”

    Contrary to every firearms expert for the last 150 years!

  • csh954rr February 11, 2015, 12:45 am

    Damn…for almost 3k you might as well go and get the socom 16 and drop it in a Juggernaut Rogue chassis. Trigger is better, transfer bar to trigger back has very little room for error. It’s a 308 round vs 223/556….it’s all milled aircraft aluminum…And its made in America. Though it is heavy weighing around 12-13lbs depending on optics. I run a trijicon rx01 an magpul pro as backup. Drop in a 25 rd mag and the balance and ability to get, and stay on target is awesome. Then if you need more noise…add the juggerbrake.

    • Sigviscious October 23, 2016, 8:39 am

      It is made in America. It’s also closer to $2000 or under, not $3K. Its a bit pricey, but damn it’s a good weapon.

  • Maynard February 10, 2015, 9:41 am

    LE pricing is $1,600.00. I wish I had this during the Frein manhunt instead of my 6920; way more comfortable for long periods and room clearings.

  • Mobettahtavor February 10, 2015, 2:58 am

    I bought two of these & sold my Ar’s except for my RRA .308 long range monster. These are so easy to shoulder & are more easier to use & quicker to switch mags than my AR’s.

  • Jeff Hunt February 9, 2015, 11:28 pm

    Forgot about the Shooting Sight trigger pack. Choices are good!

  • Jeff Hunt February 9, 2015, 11:26 pm

    Forgot about the Shooting Sight trigger pack. Choices are good!

  • Docrodney February 9, 2015, 10:20 pm

    I bought mine from my local FFL dealer fro $1559.00. Already had an Aimpoit pro on my Sig Sauer 556R so I switched and put it on my Tavor. Then put a scope on my Sig for better distance shooting. I dont mind the trigger pull but am thinking of swapping out the trigger with an after marked one. I shoot my Tavor then shoot my Colt LE 6920 which has a trigger upgrade and there is an amazing difference.

  • Jay February 9, 2015, 9:27 pm

    lol..If these firearm manufacturers were dumb enough to only build products based on what so many narrow minded american ‘citizen’ consumers with internet fueled egos and opinions insisted on, the only pistol that anyone would ever have an option of getting would be a 1911 and the only ‘assault’ (yea-yea, I know…) rifle would be a Colt M4, and the evolutionary potential of what woulda, coulda, shoulda..or shouldn’t would never materialized.. Oh..and we’d all be driving Jeeps.

    Such jawdroppingly narrow and closed minds here..gadzooks.. One begs to wonder what will actually happen when the military actually progresses beyond the AR. How many heads are gonna explode? It’s inevitable, mebbe not too soon, but it’s gonna happen..all the while many competing options just might catch up and surpass. Engineering, design and science..and a few more conflicts will spur such inevitabilities..

    Only thing I’m sorta confused about with this review is that this is presented as if it’s a new offering to the market, so I don’t know if there is something I missed or if the Tavor I’ve had for over a year is actually something else.. This is simply the IDF version that comes with the Mepro21 semi-permanently mated to the barrel assembly right? Didn’t that come out already? Maybe I wasn’t paying close enough attention..

    • Heidi September 11, 2016, 9:13 pm

      Jay,
      Why do people like you with big Egos always have to try to talk down to everyone else! Nobody really cares what egotist like you think, or even what you shoot, because you shoot off your mouth, better then you can shoot a target, anyway! 😝

      • Sigviscious October 23, 2016, 8:42 am

        Grownups don’t use emojis.

  • Lt. M February 9, 2015, 5:02 pm

    Col. G sir you repeat yourself

  • Kalashnikov Dude February 9, 2015, 4:52 pm

    Plus $2000 is way too much for this gun. I have the utmost respect for the IDF, and Israeli’s in general. But this is too much for this kind of rifle. Americans need to demand a little more respect from their government, importers, and retailers. It wouldn’t hurt to get a little from US gun related media as well……..

  • Gerald Fry February 9, 2015, 4:44 pm

    I bought mine for $1600 on GunsAmerica. I shoot 2-3″ at 300 yds. I put a noise director on it, as it was pretty loud . I think it’s because the barrel is so close. I put a cheap 3-9 power scope with a Halographic sight for close work. I also put a Timney trigger sear on . Pull is 4# now. Great gun for close work.

  • Mark February 9, 2015, 4:42 pm

    As the posters agree, the AR series is far better. Need a bullpup? Get in line for the Desert Tech MDR and MDR-C.

    • Aaron March 20, 2016, 7:28 am

      How that wait going for you on the MDR ? How many years has it been and only a handful of people have even shot a prototype? The Tavor is battle-proven and not a beta-test gun for a company like DT

  • Gerald Fry February 9, 2015, 4:39 pm

    I bought mine for $1600 on GunsAmerica. I shoot 2-3″ at 300 yds. I put a noise director on it, as it was pretty loud . I think it’s because the barrel is so close. I put a cheap 3-9 power scope with a Halographic sight for close work. I also put a Timney trigger sear on . Pull is 4# now. Great gun for close work.

  • Gerald Fry February 9, 2015, 4:36 pm

    I bought mine for $1600 on GunsAmerica. I shoot 2-3″ at 300 yds. I put a noise director on it, as it was pretty loud . I think it’s because the barrel is so close. I put a cheap 3-9 power scope with a Halographic sight for close work. I also put a Timney trigger sear on . Pull is 4# now. Great gun for close work.

  • Colonel G February 9, 2015, 1:37 pm

    I’ll pass on the Tavor. It’s heavy for its size, has a miserable trigger pull, awkward reload, poor relative accuracy and an absurd price tag. It may be a bit handier in close quarters, but its no battlefield rifle. That is the trouble when you try to strech a concept too far, you make too many accomodations and get an all around inferior weapon. Americans are prone to getting their heads turned by exotic foreign products (e.g. the AK 47), but when all is said and done, it is usually just as Dorthy said, “Oh, Auntie Em…there’s no place like home.”

    • Gerald Fry February 9, 2015, 4:46 pm

      I bought mine for $1600 on GunsAmerica. I shoot 2-3″ at 300 yds. I put a noise director on it, as it was pretty loud . I think it’s because the barrel is so close. I put a cheap 3-9 power scope with a Halographic sight for close work. I also put a Timney trigger sear on . Pull is 4# now. Great gun for close work.

  • Colonel G February 9, 2015, 1:37 pm

    I’ll pass on the Tavor. It’s heavy for its size, has a miserable trigger pull, awkward reload, poor relative accuracy and an absurd price tag. It may be a bit handier in close quarters, but its no battlefield rifle. That is the trouble when you try to strech a concept too far, you make too many accomodations and get an all around inferior weapon. Americans are prone to getting their heads turned by exotic foreign products (e.g. the AK 47), but when all is said and done, it is usually just as Dorthy said, “Oh, Auntie Em…there’s no place like home.”

    • Kalashnikov Dude February 9, 2015, 4:44 pm

      Colonel G, I take exception to your example of the AK47 as “exotic”. By design, ubiquitous might be a more apt descriptive term. Also by the number of spent steel 7.62×39 casings found scattered in at least all the desert shooting areas I frequent. What turned my head, starting in the late 80’s is the price point at which these rifles could be had. Much lower than the AR15 that naturally also piqued my interest. The span of years since has seen a number of market changes and disruptions induced primarily by our rogue governments illegal meddling. The results have been a rise in the price of the average AK, and generally, a lower cost for entering into the AR market. That and a steadily rising population of people spending cash in the gun market. I have my share of experience with the AR’s, and I love em like I love all firearms. But because of my initial experience with the cost, I became enamored with, and fully invested in the AK platform over the AR. To the point that any other firearm purchase would be strictly novel at this point. If I purchase another AK, I already have hundreds of mags, ammo, pouches, cases, sighting systems, stocks and spare parts of every kind. When I purchase an AR, I might could find some ammo and a spare mag or two lying around. Sincerely, I am not an exotic kind of guy. These things rarely turn my head. Utility, reliability, cost, and finally conventionality are all the very first standards a firearm must meet in order to turn my head. I consider myself to be a pretty normal, reasonable guy who is hardly alone. The media such as that which is facilitating this conversation, tends to go with the bottom line. That’s what the AR15 and rifles like the Tavor represent for them. It’s a lifestyle for me.

  • JtothaK February 9, 2015, 1:09 pm

    Here’s why the Tavor will never be anything more than a novelty gun here in the States.

    High quality AR-15 example setup using my go-to setup that has seen thousands of rounds down range:
    – Colt 6920: $900
    – Geisselle SSA-E trigger: $180
    – Aimpoint Pro: $400
    – Limitless handguard, grip, and stock options
    – Spare part availability
    – Intangibles such as the fact the vast majority of ARs are US made by Americans using a proven design with almost 60 years of combat testing in various environments, etc.
    Cost: $1480

    So for $800 less dollars we can buy an inherently more accurate rifle that’s made here in the States, with an infinitely better trigger, with almost limitless customization options, a better optic (2 MOA), vast spare parts availability, not to mention the “insurance” of knowing there are a million other AR-15’s floating around if SHTF. Is the AR perfect? No. But the Tavor isn’t close to being $800 better.

    • Gerald Fry February 9, 2015, 4:50 pm

      I bought mine for $1600 on GunsAmerica. I shoot 2-3″ at 300 yds. I put a noise director on it, as it was pretty loud . I think it’s because the barrel is so close. I put a cheap 3-9 power scope with a Halographic sight for close work. I also put a Timney trigger sear on . Pull is 4# now. Great gun for close work.

      • jack August 7, 2016, 1:53 am

        I’m getting .54″ @100 yards with match grade 77gr hpbt. i have the giesselle trigger and pack thing is super accurate and id take it over an ar for the reliability and accuracy aspect.

  • David February 9, 2015, 12:25 pm

    Did they have that sight base custom built to that high, or is that standard Mepro? My Trijicon Reflex II on my M17S has a base that is about 1/5th that high….with quick throw levers…. makes the backup sights look stupid coming up that high… Other than that and the 11 lb trigger it looks awesome, if I had 3 grand to kill I’d get one!!!!

  • matt February 9, 2015, 11:58 am

    Position of the mag release is really terrible. This is supposed to be a combat firearm. In combat you run, jump, crawl, slide, trip, fall… way too easy to accidentally bump that lever and unintentionally drop your mag.

  • Kary Olson February 9, 2015, 11:50 am

    Awkward reloads, difficult medium range accuracy, mediocre (at best) trigger…but hey, at least it’s expensive! Admittedly, I do like the look and feel of bullpups and would actually like to have one of these with one of the $300 trigger group upgrades floating around out there. At $2500 (w aftermarket trigger) it seems like the makers are a little high on the smell of their own f**ts.

    I always grin a bit when people complain about AR “fouling” and the cleaner nature of gas piston designs. At a couple shooting schools we were sent to, a few of us would purposely go a week or so (thousands of rounds) with nothing more than a squirt of CLP into the chamber every day and our mostly stock M4s would just keep on cycling our green tip rounds like it was no big deal. The thought was we’d get more practice clearing malfunctions and transitioning to secondaries, but it rarely happened.

  • Rip February 9, 2015, 11:10 am

    If the Tavor was full auto and parts were available to us common folk I would buy one . But for a semi auto its got nothing over an AR except the price.Nice rifle though.

  • Frank February 9, 2015, 10:41 am

    $2,200 for a 6 MOA rifle that has no spare parts available sounds about right for Americans in 2015.

  • Rob62 February 9, 2015, 9:48 am

    I have always wanted a Bullpup style rifle. What I have read consistently about them however is that the perceived muzzle blast is much more due to the ejection port (chamber) being right next to or under the shooters ear. I am not certain how much that effects things if wearing a good set of hearing protection. But this issue was not addressed at all in the article.

    Another drawback in today’s glutted AR15 market is that very good quality new AR’s can be picked up for right at $600-$700. Or basically 3:1 for the price of a Tavor. So what would someone rather have, three good AR15’s or one Tavor. Maybe comparing apples to oranges but worth a thought.

    Overall with a sticker price of anywhere from $2200-2800 (plus) I know this gun is not for me. Don’t know what my price point to get one would be but I do know that is way too much.

  • William Lawson February 9, 2015, 9:42 am

    Why is there no mention of mag. ( 9mm or 5.56) capacity in the Specs. ( Jacob Epstein)

  • Ken February 9, 2015, 9:26 am

    Magpul compatible or proprietary mags?

    • David Liveoak February 9, 2015, 12:15 pm

      They can use standard AR mags including the pmags, got em for mine.

      • Administrator February 9, 2015, 12:19 pm

        He is talking about the 9mm conversion.

        From the IWI website FAQ:

        7. What magazines will the 9mm conversion kits use?
        The 9x19mm conversion kit will take a modified Colt style AR-15 9mm magazine.

    • Tim February 9, 2015, 12:32 pm

      Works with USGI and Magpul magazines. I mostly use Magpul.

  • don February 9, 2015, 8:58 am

    How is this model different then my tavor that i have had for 2 years?

  • Steve February 9, 2015, 8:51 am

    I got into bullpup rifles somewhat by accident but once you acclimate to them they are the ultimate SBR. The Tavor handling is amazing and the internal mechanisms the next big step in design. Leave it to the Israelis

  • Jim February 9, 2015, 8:51 am

    Highly recommend the Geissele Super Sabre trigger and an Acog with RMR.

  • Steve February 9, 2015, 8:28 am

    This really looks like fun for the whole family. However, there is no excuse for the 11 pound trigger pull. Moreover, decent standard sights should be mandatory. Pushing $3K by the time you install an easier to use trigger group and sighting gear is borderline to a rip off.

    “Bullpup’s” are a great innovation but the manufacturer’s are of the notion that people will pay whatever they demand. Too bad the customer base isn’t insisting on choice when you buy it at the store. For instance, a Ruger 10/22 in a standard or a bullpup stock configuration for no more than a 10%Δ, or an AR for the same Δ, etc., etc., …. etc.

  • Tony February 9, 2015, 8:19 am

    is the price tag including the conversion?, and if not what is the conversion price tag?

  • Al February 9, 2015, 8:02 am

    The AUG is gas piston already.

  • Joe February 9, 2015, 7:00 am

    Seeing one up close Big and boxy comes to mind, biased against foreign design am I.
    I do like the look of the Styer Aug but I wouldn’t put my dollars on either of the two over an AR gas piston carbine

    • Frank February 9, 2015, 8:28 am

      I have a Colt HBAR, Sig 556, and STG MSAR Bullpup (USA copy of Aug) and have shot all of them at our tactical shoots. Have to say that I really like my MSAR, especially now that I have the gen 4 which takes standard AR Mags. I haven’t measured it, but don’t feel that the trigger is anywhere near the 11 lb. mark. When the timer goes off, you don’t feel it anyway.
      I have been curious about the Tavor, and am glad to see that someone is making a fwd rail for a grip, as it makes it very manueverable and easy to shove against a bulkhead for longer shots. I flet that the absence of this was a drawback.

      • Jim February 9, 2015, 9:08 am

        Got the forward picatinny rail from IWI US over a year ago and attached it and a T-pod Bipod in less than a minute.

      • Joe February 9, 2015, 9:32 am

        I’m pondering putting a gas piston on my bushmaster carbine but so far using mil speck ammo, the amount of shooting I do with it doesn’t dirty the chamber enough to create a problem.

        • Joanus February 9, 2015, 10:41 am

          You’re so G A Y. If you actually wore your balls instead of licking them you would have gotten an LWRC.
          Tata bitches!

          • Joe February 9, 2015, 12:19 pm

            Is that you Ramblow?

          • Kalashnikov Dude February 9, 2015, 5:56 pm

            Why am I waiting all day for my comments to be submitted to moderation if this gets through?

          • Lone Star Shooter February 9, 2015, 6:48 pm

            Nonthin’ smoother than LWRCI M A2………period.

          • Lone Star Shooter February 9, 2015, 6:49 pm

            Nonthin’ smoother than LWRCI M 6A2………period.

    • Andrew February 9, 2015, 7:33 pm

      Really!? Tell me when a gas impingement rifle has been as reliable as a gas piston rifle please. The whole problem with the AR platform from its inception has been the gas system. From running dirty, to overheating in desert environments causing rounds to cook off.
      I have used both & will stick with the new, easier to maintain, just as accurate, much more reliable Tavor.

      • Joe February 10, 2015, 11:23 am

        If running a couple thousand rounds without a cleaning is your bag I don’t recommend an AR. Keep your spray and pray AK full of bullets though, you will need all you can carry…

        • Kalashnikov Dude February 11, 2015, 12:21 pm

          I just need one each for anybody posing a danger to me with an AR or otherwise.

          • Joe February 11, 2015, 5:46 pm

            No, you just need one for yourself unless you die from embarrassment after spraying everything BUT your intended target eighty yards away.

  • Kirk Saatci February 9, 2015, 4:11 am

    Why Israeli defense force (IDF) 95% using American made m-16 or m-4 ?

    • Al February 9, 2015, 10:21 am

      $900 or $3,000… what would you choose to equip a Squad with? Choose the AR, & save $2,100 per soldier for Oh Idunno… Flash-Bangs, body armor, NV headgear?!

      • Albert February 9, 2015, 1:19 pm

        That’s what I was thinking. $2,700 for a rifle like this is pretty steep. For what it’s designed to do I’ll take my Mossberg 500 and add a Mosin Nagant rifle and have plenty of firepower with money to spare. I just think it’s more of a novelty. For practical purposes and versatility I still say an AR beats it hands down for less money.

    • Andrew February 9, 2015, 7:27 pm

      Not that many are. Some of the armor corps still use the Galil AR, while most older soldiers & reservists still use the M 16 / 4, which are being phased out.These were basically sold to Israel through US loans that had the stipulation that the money had to be spent on US products.
      This is one of the pitfalls of US aid to a country like Israel. It harms Israel’s own companies that supply it forces with equipment & also foreign sales. The US gets to veto some of these agreed sales to 3rd party countries.

    • Shrapnel February 12, 2015, 4:26 pm

      Tavor without the extras offered in this particular article average close to high-end ARs on today’s US market. I don’t know many AR shooters not using some type of red dot scope, laser, flash light, custom fore grips, triggers, comps, and etc. If you equip a AR with the same gear show on this Tavor most likely the over all price will be the same.

      The only issue I have with the Tavor design is the 1-7 twist barrel rate. I wish IWI would produce a 1-9 twist rate barrel version for the average American Joe and Law Enforcement Depts across the Nation stocked up on 55gr ammo. Personally I prefer the 55gr 223 for whitetail deer size game. I’ve shot a lot of deer with different 223/556 projectiles and the everyday FMJ 55gr projectile from a 1-9 twist produces some of the best results in comparison. The average 55gr projectile from a 1-7 twist is not accurate beyond 80yds and I’ve seen some projectiles disintegrate in mid flight.

    • Shrapnel February 12, 2015, 4:33 pm

      The average price for our allies and Israel to buy American M16/M4 is $0 = free…! So why not equip a large army with free firepower.

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