IWI US Tavor X95—The Ultimate 5.56mm Bullpup!

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The 5.56mm Tavor X95 from IWI US takes the bullpup concept to the next level. Adam Garrison of HTC (High Threat Concealment) is shown here familiarizing himself with the X95.

The 5.56mm Tavor X95 from IWI US takes the bullpup concept to the next level. Adam Garrison of HTC (High Threat Concealment) is shown here familiarizing himself with the X95.

To learn more, visit https://www.iwi.us/X95/XB16.aspx

Buy one on GunsAmerica – https://www.gunsamerica.com/Search.aspx?T=x95

IWI US is known for its bullpup rifles. The 5.56mm Tavor was originally introduced to the US market back in 2013 and has been a tremendous hit. With more than 60,000 rifles out in the wild, saying that Israeli-based, US-made firearm has done well is an understatement. Now with the introduction of the new X95 variant of the Tavor, IWI US is attempting to convert the rest of the US into a nation of bullpup fans.

The X95 variant of the Tavor is an enhanced and upgraded version of the IWI US Tavor SAR bullpup.

The X95 variant of the Tavor is an enhanced and upgraded version of the IWI US Tavor SAR bullpup. Image courtesy of IWI US.

SPECS

  • Chambering: 5.56 NATO
  • Barrel: 16.5 inches
  • OA Length: 26.15 inches
  • Weight: 7.9 pounds
  • Stock: Polymer
  • Sights: Folding; front sight (tritium insert), rear sight (aperture)
  • Action: Closed rotating bolt, long stroke gas piston
  • Finish: Matte black
  • Capacity: 30+1 (AR/M16 magazines)
  • MSRP: $1,999

ERGONOMICS

The bullpup concept locates the action into the rear buttstock area and behind the trigger, resulting in a very short and compact weapon.

The bullpup concept locates the action into the rear buttstock area and behind the trigger, resulting in a very short and compact weapon.

Looking at the bullpup design as a whole, it is clear that they struggle with ergonomics. Historically it has always been difficult to perform magazine changes, clear malfunctions or unload the rifles. You name it, the bullpup makes it just a bit harder (but you gain compact handling characteristics and good ballistic performance). Does the X95 suffer from these shortcomings?

In my opinion, yes the X95 does. But only if you are moving to this rifle from another style of firearms. Looking at this rifle compared to an AR-15 or an AK-pattern weapon, yes the ergonomics are a bit of a stretch. It will be awkward to do magazine changes, clear malfunctions and engage targets.

Does this mean that the average shooter can’t pick up an X95 and competently use the rifle? Not at all. Given a small amount of training and familiarization, these rifles are just as easy to shoot and use as any other weapon. Ultimately it all comes down to training and the shooter’s willingness to learn how to use the rifle properly. And if done, the benefits of the design can make it well worth the effort.

The new Tavor X95 differs from the original Tavor SAR through the addition of several enhancements and upgrades. It includes a new fire control pack with a 5- to 6-lb. trigger pull, a repositioned and ambidextrous magazine release similar to that of an AR-15, a forearm with rails at the 3, 6, and 9 o’clock positions, a relocated charging handle and a modular Tavor-style pistol grip that can be swapped out to a standard pistol grip with traditional trigger guard. In addition, it has a smaller, lower-profile bolt release button.

the X95 comes up to the shoulder very quickly and is easy to move from target to target. However, loading and operating it requires a different manual of arms than an AR-style firearm.

the X95 comes up to the shoulder very quickly. However, operating it requires a different manual of arms than an AR-style firearm.

Beyond its function, the X95 is also very ergonomic form a textural and utility standpoint. The body of the rifle is constructed of high-strength polymer. The polymer helps keep heat off of the shooter’s face and hands. The polymer is also lightly textured, making it tactile but yet slick enough that it doesn’t get caught on clothes or gear. The pistol grip has a coarse texture and incorporates a cutlass-style handguard in an effort to protect the shooter’s hand.

Moving to the forend of the rifle, the X95 offers its shooter the option of running the gun with the rail panels on or off. With the panels on the rifle, the shooter is protected from the 1913 rail while still having plenty grip on the gun. With the panels removed, the shooter can use the rails for traction or conversely add a vertical grip, lights or lasers.

All in all, the X95 is without a question the most ergonomic bullpup rifle on the market I have tested. For new shooters the X95 is an easy weapon to learn to shoot well. For those moving away from an AR-15 or AK, the transition to a bullpup may take a little getting used to. But, might be worth the effort!

The forend can be run naked as seen here or with the rail panels. Notice the quick detach cups built in to the forend.

The forend can be run naked as seen here or with the rail panels. Notice the quick detach cups built in to the forend.

Field stripping the Tavor X95 is as easy and simple as pushing one pin.

Field stripping the Tavor X95 is as easy and simple as pushing one pin.

SHOOTING THE X95

Shooting the X95 is unlike shooting any other bullpup on the market. To put it simply, the rifle just does it better than other bullpups. Why? Well it probably has something to do with how recently it was designed and put into production. Hitting the scene in 2009, the X95 has a few decades of engineering and weapon design on the competition.

The Tavor X95 is more than capable of practical accuracy. Here is a 1.23-inch group shot at 50 meters with the X95 and IMI 77-grain OTM.

The Tavor X95 is more than capable of practical accuracy. Here is a 1.23-inch group shot at 50 meters with the X95 and IMI 77-grain OTM.

Keeping true to its design and ergonomics, the X95 is a pleasure to shoot. Recoil is tame and muzzle climb is non-existent. Part of this is due to the weight of the rifle coming in at just under 8 pounds unloaded, and the other part of this is due to the 5.56x45mm cartridge the rifle shoots.

Beyond felt recoil and handling the rifle continues to impress. During long strings of fire, the rifle remains cool. Can the X95 get too hot to handle? I’m sure of it. But under normal shooting conditions possibly firing 60 to 90 rounds down range in rapid succession, it will not be a problem.

One flaw of the bullpup design is the use of trigger linkage. It inherently makes the triggers bad and leaves most shooters underwhelmed if not unhappy with bullpup rifles. While yes, the X95 has the best stock bullpup trigger I’ve felt, it is still less than ideal. However, compared to the heavy standard trigger of the original Tavor, the X95’s 6-lb. trigger pull is a huge improvement.

Reloading the X95 is straight-up easy. The forward-mounted ambidextrous magazine releases make dropping a magazine easy and possible without compromising your firing grip on the weapon. Given that you use magazines that drop free, reloads with the X95 are lighting fast.

THE REAL STORY ON ITS ACCURACY

I’ve seen allot of claims that the X95 is broken because it is incapable of sub-2 inch groups at 100 meters. People are saying they are defective and that the design is flawed. I for one don’t agree. In an attempt to see what my rifle was able to produce I decided to shoot the X95 with a Primary Arms 1-6 scope at 50 and 100 meters.

Utilizing a bench, a Caldwell Lead Sled and some IMI 77 gr OTM I tried to remove as much of the human element from the accuracy test as possible. The X95 was able to produce a 1.23-inch group at 50 meters and at 100 meters it produced a 2.17-inch group.  Give that this isn’t a purpose-built precision rifle, I’d say the X95 is more than competent. This is especially true when you consider that the US Military accepts service grade rifles with accuracy up to 5 inches at this distance.

It is also important to remember that the X95 isn’t designed to be a sniper rifle. That being considered, I can confidently say it is more than capable of engaging targets out to 400 meters with relative ease.

ACCESSORIES AND WHAT IS STILL TO COME

The Mepro RDS Pro is one of the finest examples of a red dot sight I’ve ever used. The glass is crystal clear and the dot is clean and precise.

The Mepro RDS Pro is one of the finest examples of a red dot sight I’ve ever used. The glass is crystal clear and the dot is clean and precise.

While the X95 is great right out of box, there are a few things you will want to pick up as well be on the look out for. The first thing you will want to purchase for the X95 is a solid optic. For this review, I used both a 1-6X scope and my new favorite red dot sight, the Mepro RDS Pro. I found that the Primary Arms 1-6X was perfect for doing accuracy testing and all around plinking. In low magnification, it allows for quick but accurate shooting. For me though, the X95 is less of a precision rifle and more of a “blaster,” so the Mepro RDS Pro is my preferred optic. The RDS Pro really shines at close distances and makes fast shots very easy. If you are a collector like me, it is also very cool to have the most current optic out of Israel on top of the most current rifle from Israel.

In the coming year, IWI US plans to bring a (SBR) short barreled rifle version of the X95 to market as well as 300 Blackout and 9mm versions. IWI US will also offer the SBR and caliber conversion kits for people wishing to upgrade their existing rifles. I have already registered my rifle as an SBR, so when the kits become available you will get a firsthand look at the process and the short-barreled rifle’s performance. So stay tuned for more on that process and availability.

Here is a sneak peek at what the X95 SBR should look like with a 13-inch barrel.

Here is a sneak peek at what the X95 SBR should look like with a 13-inch barrel.

Beyond optics and factory accessories, the X95 already has aftermarket support. Companies such as Manticore Arms, Gearhead Works, and Geissele make rails, port covers, triggers and other small parts upgrades for the rifles. The X95 shares a lot of parts in common with the old Tavor SAR, so the odds are most accessories for it will work with a little bit of massaging.

 

PRICE AND AVAILABILITY

IWI US is a gun company many Americans know and love. They build high-end rifles designed for civilians and professionals alike with no compromise on quality. The X95 is something of a game changer. While yes, it is evolutionary in the fact that it is just a modernized Tavor, it still embodies features that make it unlike any rifle before it. In my opinion, IWI knocked it out of the park with this rifle.

The X95 is available now and can be purchased online for right around $1,800. Where will the price settle to in the months to come? After demand is met and politics settle I imagine the X95 will be available for $1,600 new all day long. For me and most people, it isn’t worth risking the wrong person in the White House or waiting for demand to subside. I am buying mine now!

An OD Green or FDE variant of the X95 would blend in much better out in the woods.

An OD Green or FDE variant of the X95 would blend in much better out in the woods.

Running the gun without rail panels helped with traction on a hot dusty day at the range.

Running the gun without rail panels helped with traction on a hot dusty day at the range.

 

{ 51 comments… add one }
  • Maurice June 1, 2017, 4:33 am

    I do own an AR platform with interchangeable barrels and optics that I am happy with, but I also love the idea of a solidly built cqb weapon for vehicle borne use with some no name holographic sight that I’m able to maintain 2 – 3 inch groups between 75 and 100 yards with. I also own a pre accu trigger Savage that used to garner derision until the consistent sub moa groups with the much lower price tag was noticed. I purchase various tools to fit objectives I envision then practice to overcome any shortcomings between me and the tool of choice. A piece of Archery tape over the unused ejection port, a bit of extra vigilance shooting weak side, I’m very happy with this piece of “kit”. Long winded version aside, each tool in your box has different uses, strengths and weaknesses, as will the user, but with proper and consistent training each tool can be used effectively for its purpose! Happy and safe shooting.

    • Link Lackluster July 28, 2017, 7:44 am

      I like the Tavor because it is a kosher rifle and every jihadist shot with it is denied entry into his muslim paradise. It is pre-defiled because it is Israeli. I like that. I’m buying a safe full of them.

  • WD April 4, 2017, 4:43 pm

    I bought one and I’m extremely happy with it. I had one overriding criteria and that was being able to cleanly dismount my vehicle. I’m sure that there are people here who have lovely AR’s outfitted with the choicest selection of LEGO toys attached who can shoot sub MOA groups all day. I need optics, light and fast handling and that’s what I have.

    • Rod July 28, 2017, 7:48 am

      I sold mine in 1 week it is unacapable that the rifle is so imaccurate. With its 18″ barrel you get good powder burn and they should make the gun at least 1 MIA so it could accurately be shot at 300 yds. I called them up and their spec on the gun is 3MOA!!!!.. so at 300 yds you automatically are shooting with 9″ of error.

      I have a Wilson Cobalt that shoots sub MOA even using PMC ammo. Using the mentioned 77 gr ammo it will shoot sub MOA. When your life depends on it why not have a 5.56 that will accurately shoot further??

      Also the trigger is still awful even with its new design. Get yourself a 1 MOA from someone and still use and you will be much happier. If you think that a shorter setup is needed then do a SBR on it.

      Having said all of this I really liked the gun and if they ever make it to shoot MOA with inexpensive ammo such as PMC or others I Would then buy one and fix the trigger.

      • Adam September 16, 2017, 6:22 pm

        NO ONE makes a bullpup that even comes close to shooting 1MOA. I think you’re doing this rifle a disfavor. If you want precision buy a bolt rifle. If you must have it in a semi-auto get an AR. If you really must have a semi-auto bullpup… maybe Desert Tech? (if you short-barrel that 5.56 AR, you are seriously neutering it; maybe a .300 blackout SBR?) But again, bullpups are NOT precision rifles. Still, 3MOA? That’s a 12″ circle at 400yds; good enough for the battlefield.

  • Hootch January 28, 2017, 12:06 am

    For me, this rifle is the Holy Grail of weapons. Here’s why. For25 years I have searched for a rifle that my Lovely Bride can handle. As she has gotten older and her hands weaker, her Sig 556 just got too heavy up front for her. We looked at a bunch of AR’s, but all were too front heavy. Then she picked up a X95. The world changed and the sun shone. She thinks that it is about the ugliest thing she has ever seen, but when she handled it, the ugly went away and now she wants one.

  • Tom Benton December 12, 2016, 8:07 am

    I purchased an AR15 pistol when the ATF allowed the Sig Brace to be shouldered. When they recounted, I knew another platform was required for a short, maneuverable full powered weapon. I decided on the Kel Tec RDB over the Tavor with the x95 still not in production. The ergonomics of the RDB were more acceptable to my tastes and there were a host of reviews by competent reviewers extolling it’s virtues. I have owned the RDB two years and it is a pleasure to shoot. It acheives 2″ groups at 100 yds with xm193 ammo. I have a Holosun red dot mounted as my purpose for this platform is short rangs, rapid firepower.
    Though I have a concealed permit amd practice with handguns frequently, I am well aware of the statistics regarding handgun accuracy in stressful situations. The RDB is easy to maneuver in my home and is no longer then an extended handgun. It is now
    the weapon I would choose to defend my home, no doubt. Additionally, at the range everyone is impressed with the lack of recoil from the RDB and the ability to maneuver it easily. It also digests mixed loads in a mag without hiccups. The RDB is a piston action and remains clean after many rounds. I do agree that clearing a malfunction would take considerable time vs an AR. Changing mags is easy once you adopt the platform. It sadly has become a violent world. My hometown was disrupted with riots this summer. My RDB with 4 , 30 round mags was ready, if the fight came to my door, they picked the wrong house.

    • ....? January 22, 2017, 2:02 am

      Neat story. Not sure how it relates to the article.

    • dennis September 6, 2017, 3:28 pm

      Yeah for real what does this article have to do with your story? I hope it was sarcasm. Was it??

  • EG September 25, 2016, 6:57 pm

    I have an AR15’s and two Tavor’s (SAR and X95). If you’re shooting ranges up to 600 yards – AR15 is the choice, but for 25, 50, 75 yards and emergency CQB (home defense) – Tavor’s are my firearm of choice. AR15’s are more accurate but it needs consistent cleaning and oiling whereas the Tavor is pretty mush a dry rifle. I kind of compare them with 1911’s and Glock. 1911’s need oiling also whereas Glock is a dry gun. Both firearms have their apples and oranges when it comes to accuracy and reliability.

  • GeraldMcGiboney August 21, 2016, 8:29 pm

    Hey Guy’s ,when you guys first purchased your ar’s they were pricey in my standards ! ,Why don’t you back off a little ? Some of you probably paid $50,000 -$65,000 for pickum -up truck ,and I’m going to slash you over your choice even if think it’s laughable !! Anyway my purchase of the X95 was not to please anybody but ME!!! It was my idea of close quarters & up to 100-200-300 yards only if needed .I’ll do as the last guy suggested & buy the right ammo , and I’m sure non will care, they will wish it was the their X95 !!! By the way it will I’m sure Last longer than your trucks or BMW’s And do what I need ! PS And I won’t have too spend a$1,000 to $1,500 for tires every few month’s Ya Think ?

    • dennis September 6, 2017, 3:33 pm

      This story of yours shows why people shouldn’t drink. Dude when you sober up read what you wrote.

  • Ned July 19, 2016, 8:22 pm

    Well I bought one and look forward to shooting it. If you can’t pay to play, shut the hell up! Why bad mouth a product you haven’t even shot?

  • Johnny Russell July 19, 2016, 12:48 pm

    Either buy it or don’t buy, like it or don’t. I own one have for years and love it. It would be my SHTF rifle. Own several ARs and like those also. Some of BS comments on here is just too much. Laughable.

  • MARK STEWART July 19, 2016, 5:38 am

    Whose got the cheese franchise in here? For as much “whine” that’s flowing in here they’d make a mint. It appears the majority in here have only one purpose, to complain. Why comment if you don’t care for the rifle or at least bring constructive comments about it, yet it turns into a bellyaching diatribe. One commented about the RDB, that is okay when they are available in gun stores but that is few and in between while the Tavors are in most gun shops, which gives them the edge. The triggers are military style triggers, hence they are not target quality which is why after market trigger groups are out there. The SBR version are for those few who would like to have one, same as those who want a true M4 style AR-15 and are willing to go through all the paperwork. Also, many law enforcement agencies may be interested in it as well. The .300 Blackout would be a great addition, for only the barrel needs to be changed. However, the 9mm takes time to change the barrel and the inner workings from 5.56mm to 9mm, then again that time to convert it back. The caliber for conversion that could be a big seller would be 7.62x39mm, for none of the other bullpups out there are chambered for this round. and it probably sell well overseas as well due to the caliber is used in many countries around the world. Also, the ammo is inexpensive to buy. I’ve given my dime’s worth and will be off. For some of you, enjoy your “whine” party…and don]t complain when someone does the same about you. Tata

  • Mahatma Muhjesbude July 18, 2016, 5:30 pm

    Sorry Charlie, only the Best tuna get to be on my A-Team in real time high speed low drag action games. And this is not even a guppie, in my vast oceanic gun ‘fishing’ experience.

    It can’t do anything better than my highly tricked (but still at only around HALF the price of this thing) AR 5.56 PDW Civilian legal Pistol with the latest compact 7oz pistol ‘brace’ Mine’s lighter and almost as short without a suppressor with a 11.5 inch pencil barrel. and a Shockwave Technologie Blade pistol stabilizer.that weighs only 7 oz. lol. And it’s very well balanced and wieldable with the 100 round sure-fire mags.

    When i tried one of these i remembered what a fellow highly experienced contractor told me about bullpups and with whom i agreed. Bull pups were originally designed to help reduce the size of a standard issue military combat rifle without sacrificing barrel length. But for rapid magazine changes they simply are not ergonomically user friendly for this. “Awkward’ magazine changes and handling cannot be tolerated in real high intensity CQB. Lots of dead Viet Cong and NVA soldiers can attest to that when they tried rapid mag reloads in a firefight and jammed them in hard and took too ‘terminally’ long to unjam them, And bull pups are notorious for ‘awkward aka clumsy mag switches where you drop them if you try to keep your barrel leveled to target. The idea of an optimal CQB PDW is to eliminate such issues, not ‘accept’ them with a qualification that ‘you’ll get used to it’?

    Not much, if anything, these days anymore, beats the proprietarily mission tuned AR-15 for this, and likely never will if they keep making this kind of wallet gouging crap.

    This should be put up there in the gun museums right next to the Israeli pistol that shoots around corners…and forgotten about ..

    • ....? January 22, 2017, 2:06 am

      Neat. You sound super hardcore. I bet you have a lot of experience telling stories.

  • Alvin York July 18, 2016, 3:47 pm

    What the heck is ” High Threat Concealment” ?

    • Link Lackluster July 28, 2017, 7:39 am

      It’s when someone hides behind a rock way way way way up in the countryside. If the rock is rocky enough, it could even pass as high threat cover. But it had to be a pretty rocky rock. No softish rocks.

  • Warner Anderson July 18, 2016, 3:29 pm

    As a long-time AR shooter including actual gunfight, I had a hard time transitioning to the (older model) Tavor. The controls were not habitual and didn’t really make intuitive sense. Then I found a source for the IDF TTPs for it and the light dawned. The IDF does not just and them out and say “figure it out,” like if you were buying it at the gun store. The manual of arms is entirely different and folks who badmouth the ergonomics have ASSumed that the AR is the pinnacle of firearms development. In reality, if you can’t do a mag change faster with a Tavor, then you’re doing it wrong. On the down side, the Tavor trigger sucked at 12 lb or so, and even pulling off the “desert sand fail-safe” return spring, it ran probably a rough 8 lb. An aftermarket trigger ran me $300+ (STFU, it’s my money!) and it shoots andgroips as well as any of my ARs. BTW, I carried a Steyr AUG battlefield pickup as my primary weapon in OIF-1 (an advantage of SOF) and if your ops are mounted, a bullpup is the ONLY way to go.

  • Rob July 18, 2016, 3:12 pm

    Curious that people always bring up cost regarding firearms. As far as I know, cost won’t hold an
    American back if he really wants something, even if it is a watered down version of a military product.
    Hummers are a good example. A lot of peoples gun collections run into the 10’s of thousands easily, so
    to quibble over price is to me a kind of depression era survivor metallicity, like, “When I was young we didn’t have thousands of dollars to spend on a rifle, we only had the old winchester to bring in the meat, and it was fine.”
    Gee, kids, I guess the same could be said for every car that is made today that is over 15,000 dollars.
    Mustangs and Ferraris must not make any sense to people like this.

    • Mahatma Muhjesbude July 20, 2016, 7:02 pm

      Rob, good logic, but Cabbage to Corn comparisons. With something like a firearm that you might have to depend on for your life, it at least has to be ‘worth it’, especially in terms of reliability and function advantage, if you’re getting gouged for it in price? Dontcha Think?

      Or put another way, in the ‘other’ age old tradition aphorism…’is it a good Bang for the buck?

      Otherwise you’re just a compulsive consumer obsessed with all firearms especially something new and different and cost effectiveness does not rise to your level of endorphin induced ‘happy’ feelings about what you purchase. Which is your right as an American Free and affluent buyer! I’ve got that problem with fast motorcycles, faster airplanes, and even Faster Women! But not with guns. I’m not even a collector although i’ve fired and/or used professionally almost every military small arms weapon out there.

      But a lot of us who can even easily afford something like this simply can’t understand why someone would want to spend two grand on this and STILL have to pay more to get a satisfactory trigger, when you can get two almost three factory DPMS 16″flattop Panther Carbines right now from Sportsman’s Guide at $522. each which means THREE perfectly adequate all-purpose defense weapons for the price of one of these bullpups, all of which would more than likely outshoot this thing in all areas? Or, for same price as this Bullpup, get a semi-auto version of the LWCR AR PDW, or trick your own using the same telescoping proprietary very short stock which brings it as short or shorter than this X95. And is way superior to this bullpup in all areas? Which is why the new federal gun contract is for the LWCR PDW–and which they’ll be using on us when they come to confiscate our own ARs and X-95’s.

      I mean… that just seems stupid? And you shouldn’t really be Stupid, if you’re playing with guns? Right? Tryin to say this bullpup is worth it over a good compact Ar platform to justify the cost is only advertising your stupidity? Right? The only Caveat being that if you think Ninja Mall Cool looking is worth the gouge price because you’re already bored with your AR collection, well, again, that’s the legacy of being an American gun owner. Go for it? You can hang it right there in your collection next to the fifty Gyrojet rocket pistol?

      Otherwise, Cmon? Anyone? I’ll even buy the beer while someone explains that to me?

      • G September 3, 2016, 10:24 pm

        I think that the obvious appeal of the Tavor is the size and barrel length. The AR15 platform can not fit a 16.5in barrel into a 26in OAL rifle, so if someone wants a compact rifle without going through all the SBR BS then a X95 is the obvious choice. The question of if its worth it or not is totally subjective, but with over 50k of the old model sold the answer is clearly yes to a lot of people. I hope this helps you understand all those peoples reasoning.

      • Craig December 20, 2016, 8:39 pm

        Wow Mahatma Muhjesbude you are a bit of an opinionated jerk. Calling people stupid because of what they like or how much they pay. Everyone has a different affordability level and firearms fit everyone differently. An AR is a great rifle and I have several in different configurations. They do not handle like a bullpup so someone may like that design better, weight distribution, distance they shoot etc. They may use it for a different scenario wether it be life dependent or not. Price points will drop over time and the design will get better.

  • Skyviking July 18, 2016, 12:48 pm

    Why bother with an SBR variant of a bullpup? $200 for Three Inches of barrel??? Money would be better spent on a Geissele trigger – or an SBR AR that would shoot rings around it. The Steyr AUG shoots sub-moa groups, even with its crappy trigger.

  • Dave July 18, 2016, 11:03 am

    I’m a cross-functional shooter (right-handed but can only close my right eye) so I shoot from my left shoulder with left hand on the trigger. The right-handed bullpup’s sliding bolt rakes across my cheek. Do they have a left-handed version?

    • Scott Fetter July 18, 2016, 2:12 pm

      The tavor can be switched for either left or right handed shooters. It’s all about switching some covers around and charging handle, so it will eject out the left side instead of the right. At least my older tavor is that way, I wouldn’t think they would get rid of that feature to limit buyers.

  • Alfonso Alfredo Rodriguez July 18, 2016, 11:02 am

    I have shot this weapon. It has the crappiest trigger I have ever encountered in a rifle. It reminds me of a 1980 H&R 22lr revolver I once shot; the trigger was so bad that I had to cut the trigger spring to get it to shoot as “barely passable” The CIVILIAN version TABOR as it come from the factory, is over priced, not very accurate because of a very, very poor trigger. Because of the trigger, it shoots ten inch group or larger at 50 yards by an inexperience shooter. Inexperience, cheap ammo and super bad trigger equals bad accuracy. An experience shooter can get smaller groups but is a lot of work and not a pleasurable experience. You can get an after market trigger for it but add another 300 to 400 dollars to an already expensive rifle and it is just not worth it. In the Military Channel I saw a TV show several years ago where the show’s host, an ex Navy Seal, shoots a military version of it in Israel while the rifle was still in testing phase, he liked it very much and was getting hits at 300 yards from the standing position but it obviously had a much better trigger. I am sure he would be appalled by the civilian version’s trigger. If IMI puts a better trigger on it and reduces the price a couple of hundred dollars, I am sure it would be a fine rifle for the civilian market.

    • G September 3, 2016, 10:28 pm

      Did you shoot the Tavor SAR or this new Tavor X95? Because they have put a much better trigger into it (from 11-12 pounds down to 5-6 pounds)

  • Alfonso Alfredo Rodriguez July 18, 2016, 11:02 am

    I have shot this weapon. It has the crappiest trigger I have ever encountered in a rifle. It reminds me of a 1980 H&R 22lr revolver I once shot; the trigger was so bad that I had to cut the trigger spring to get it to shoot as “barely passable” The CIVILIAN version TABOR as it come from the factory, is over priced, not very accurate because of a very, very poor trigger. Because of the trigger, it shoots ten inch group or larger at 50 yards by an inexperience shooter. Inexperience, cheap ammo and super bad trigger equals bad accuracy. An experience shooter can get smaller groups but is a lot of work and not a pleasurable experience. You can get an after market trigger for it but add another 300 to 400 dollars to an already expensive rifle and it is just not worth it. In the Military Channel I saw a TV show several years ago where the show’s host, an ex Navy Seal, shoots a military version of it in Israel while the rifle was still in testing phase, he liked it very much and was getting hits at 300 yards from the standing position but it obviously had a much better trigger. I am sure he would be appalled by the civilian version’s trigger. If IMI puts a better trigger on it and reduces the price a couple of hundred dollars, I am sure it would be a fine rifle for the civilian market.

  • Christopher Rushlau July 18, 2016, 10:55 am

    Part of being a citizen is engaging in “Kremlin-watching”: trying to figure out what is going on in the “halls of power” wherever those are, and more importantly trying to figure out what they are thinking in those halls about what is going on outside. Israel has now commenced a count-down to becoming a democracy (where the Palestinian majority under Israeli administration gains civil rights): this has now gone from being a unavoidable presumption to being countable, a mathematical certainty in quantitative terms, though I cannot say what terms. I can say why this has happened. The Persian Gulf monarchies have now passed the point of no return on their own respective journeys to rule-of-law democracy, though not so certainly that any timeline is even in theory articulable. The main US “dog in the hunt” in the world has been those monarchies, and Israel now realizes that that prior commitment leaves it no alternative survival strategy than as a popular, law-based state. A pyramid cannot be toppled. That “tick, tick” we now hear, then, only has the very limited but very clear significance of reminding us that self-contradiction is the death of law, so the sooner we place our bet on democracy and rule-of-law internationally, the more likely we will win. “You got to know when to hold ’em, know when to fold ’em, know when to walk away, know when to run. You never count your money when you’re sittin’ at the table, there’ll be time enough for countin’ when the dealin’s done.” Song by Don Schlitz.
    Manticore was the evil corporation in Dark Angel with Jessica Alba. No, it was the name of the project. You got to believe in the good guys or it doesn’t matter how many rounds you shoot.

    • Ron Ottoson July 18, 2016, 3:33 pm

      What does all this hot air have to do with the X-95. Focus buddy, focus.

  • WiscoGunner July 18, 2016, 10:55 am

    The Tavor actually only costs $500. They charge $1500 for shipping. 😉 You can buy 3 Ruger SR556 for the same price…or buy two of the Ruger’s and outfit them nicely with the leftover $600.

  • Joe July 18, 2016, 9:27 am

    Can we get a discount given that we send poor struggling Israel $3.1B in taxpayer money every year?

  • ToddB July 18, 2016, 8:54 am

    When did molded plastic become more expensive than forged metal? Or is it the foreign brands just think their stuff is that special. FN selling a ‘mil spec’ M4 for $1700. A mostly plastic rifle from Beretta is $1800. Now a mostly plastic Tayvor is only $2k. Yea I will stick with what I have.

    • Darren P. July 18, 2016, 2:38 pm

      Damn good point. Once again another weapon you CAN afford AS LONG AS You clear 250,000$ a year. For a mostly plastic gun like the man before me expressed. Not going to happen people.

  • Tom Benton July 18, 2016, 8:41 am

    Purchased a Kel Tec RDB bullpup six months ago. When making the purchase, I understood that the bullpup design
    was not as accurate as my AR’s. I already owned an AR pistol and really desired an SBR but did not want the hassel of
    a tax stamp and scrutiny of the ATF. To say I am pleased with the bullpup platform for close quarter combat would be a
    vast understatement. Outfitted with a Holosun red dot, this package is light, ergonomic and a pleasure to shoot. One can easily
    utilize the RDB as a home defense weapon and destroy metal discs at 100 yards with complete comfidence.
    At my rifle range, members enjoying exchanging guns to test. No one has been disappointed with the RDB. In fact everyone
    Stands in line to shoot it.
    No, the RDB is not as accurate as my AR with a wylde chamber and 4 lb match trigger. But living in an urban environment, if
    I were to choose one gun for defense, it would be the RDB. Shots at 100 yards are a done deal and it can easily be maneuvered
    Inside a home to defends ones life. After six months, you couldn’t seperate me from my bullpup.

  • survivor50 July 18, 2016, 8:35 am

    The weapon is TOO light, the front hand guard is TOO skinny, and it’s TOO cheap!

  • Vins July 18, 2016, 8:18 am

    What about the barrel? Is it threaded with that flash hider so you can put your can on? I didn’t see that in the review.

    • Andrew July 18, 2016, 9:11 am

      Yes it is threaded & you can put a can on it.

  • Colize Holmes July 18, 2016, 7:28 am

    By what you are.saying its easy to say that they paid you off. At $1800 – $2000, the gun is not worth the money. 4 – 8 inch groups at 100 yards is too dam sad. I seen mini 14 getting under 2 inch groups at 100 yards. And the o my cost $ 650 – $ 750. You can keep your tavor I will buy a ruger mini 14 and still have $ 1100 – $ 1300 in my pocket.

  • Get Real July 18, 2016, 7:18 am

    Its Plastic Disposable junk at a PREMIUM MSRP: $1,999 which is FAR to much to pay for something that has a manufacturing cost of 200 dollars!

    • GaryD July 18, 2016, 7:46 am

      I’m really curious where you came up with a production cost of $200.00. I suspect you pulled that ‘fact’, as well as the rest of your opinion, out of your ass.

      Personally, I have no idea what the actual productions cost is, so I will not insult the intelligence of other readers with ludicrous claims, but I’m quite certain the cost exceeds your mark several times.

      As for it being “Plastic Disposable junk”, one only has to consider the obvious to refute the ignorance of such a comment. The IDF has some of the most sophisticated and durable weapons on the battlefield; the future of Israel depends upon that. If this wasn’t a quality weapon platform, it would never be in the hands of Israeli soldiers, much less on the battlefield…..and yet we see it replacing the M16/M4.

      Your opinion really poses a conundrum; should we trust your opinion, or the people who’s lives actually depend on the gun?

  • MrSatyre July 15, 2016, 2:35 pm

    Quick question: is registering a rifle which is not—in its present form—an SBR any different than registering a factory SBR? I’ll be picking up a 16″ X-95 when my local dealer gets them back in Stock, but would like to pick up the SBR conversion kit when it gets released. Thanks!

    • Steve July 18, 2016, 9:29 am

      It is a rifle- it has a shoulder stock and a 16 inch barrel- bullpups are still rifles. And registering a SBR you make by installing a sub 16 inch barrel is no different from a factory SBR- same $200 tax stamp, same 6 month wait, same paperwork crap. The only difference is if you’re going to build a SBR, you should keep the sub-16 inch barrel at a location separate from the rest of the rifle lest the BATFE charge you with “constructive possession”. I’ve not seen anyone charged personally but have heard a few horror stories.

  • Will Drider July 14, 2016, 8:35 pm

    $2K gun prints 2.17 @ 100 while using a lead sled, probably with Match ammo (why bother with one and not the other). Military Service Grade acceptable 5 inch groups has no bearing for comparison to a $2K rifle purchase. A $2K AR from one of the better builders would be sub MOA WITHOUT THE LEAD SLED and a under $1K AR on a Sled would be very close to 1 MOA.
    Buyers of this bullpup will not be using it from a Sled and will be stuck with crappy accuracy. Your Sled results equal 6.5 inches @300. I don’t think you could put every round on a dinner plate @ 300 without the Sled and thats a very sloppy standard. Anybody looking for a PDW is better served with another option IMHO.

    • Hugo July 14, 2016, 10:11 pm

      Aren’t they designed for CQC? If so, they are more than accurate enough and much more maneuverable than other rifles.

      • Allan Gibbs July 15, 2016, 1:55 pm

        Yes. I don’t need sub MOA for home defense. I need something compact and maneuverable in tighter spaces. I had the previous Tavor and don’t notice any accuracy difference even up to 200 yards. It’s right on par with my other rifles.

        Also, I had the Tav D trigger from Shoot Straight on my old Tavor. New Tavor’s trigger is close but Tav-D is still better. Shoot Straight will also updated your trigger free of charge.

        • Warner Anderson July 18, 2016, 3:41 pm

          Agreed. See my comment. The guys at the range can shoot “happy groups” with a 16, 18,or 20″ bbl AR – it doesn’t matter at all to the paper. But if you’re bailing out of your truck to chase away a coyote or interloper, or a police vehicle to return ambuscade fire or help a fellow officer, a bullpup is the solution.

    • Andrew N July 18, 2016, 12:00 pm

      The ammo used was IMI 77 gr OTM, Israel’s military contract ammo. That being said, it is supposed to be REALLY good stuff.

      • Mr Happy February 24, 2017, 4:57 pm

        from what i hear the Tavors with the 1:7 twist like the higher grain weights. 62 gr and above. I’m still waiting for mine to come in but I have a variety of gr weights and ammo manufacturers to run through it to see what it likes best.

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