Prepping 101: Cheap Night Vision Riflescopes

The top one (green) is my rock solid Yukon Gen I nightvision riflescope, currently $389 on Amazon. The bottom one is the Digital Crosshairs contraption.

The top one (green) is my rock solid Yukon Gen I nightvision riflescope, currently $389 on Amazon. The bottom one is the Digital Crosshairs contraption.

Digital Crosshairs
http://www.digitalcrosshairs.net/

Yukon 1.5 x 42 NVRS Riflescope
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001C74GM8/

This article is something of a shootout between my favorite (and cheap at $400) night vision scope and an interesting new digital night vision product that was made from a converted IR CCTV camera. In my experience, digital night vision normally isn’t worth the inflated pricetag. I’ve even declined to review the couple “clip on” models that I’ve tried because they were just too expensive for what you get. This product, called Digital Crosshairs, is also a clip on that uses your existing scope. But at only $400-$575, it is at least arguably worth the price. As you will see, from a Prepping 101 perspective it isn’t much of a shootout. My $400 Gen I riflescope blows away this new gimmicky nightvision with the LCD screen.

Here is the Digital Crosshairs at night, mounted on an AK-47.

Here is the Digital Crosshairs at night, connected to a 1-4x Nikon 223 scope, mounted on an AK-47.

Night vision, I have to note, should be a priority in the scope of your prepping paradigm. We have covered a few perimeter security options in this column, but what happens when your perimeter is breached at night? Two legged predators will have night vision if they are attacking at night, and if you are left in the dark, that’s pretty much it. But don’t be fooled by the armchair commandos who will tell you that you need Gen III or higher night vision at thousands of dollars. Gen I is just fine, and I have purchased and used riflescopes and binoculars under this Yukon name I have linked for you in Amazon.

This Digital Crosshairs product I can’t tell you to go and buy in good conscience. Prepping dollars are tight for most of us, and though I wish this product was a great buy, it just isn’t. Digital Crosshairs is a good idea, and I wish them well with making the product more robust, but for now it is too rough around the edges, especially as compared to to the $400 Yukon scope which I would trust my life to, and I’ll explain why.

There are a number of different ways to configure the screen position. I found that on top was the only thing practical with this scope.

There are a number of different ways to configure the screen position. I found that on top was the only thing practical with this scope.

Digital Crosshairs works a little bit different than the other clip on night vision attachments. The ones I have used fit on the front bell of the scope and you look through your standard eyepiece and reticle, at an digitally enhanced picture that is sensitive to the infrared spectrum of light normally invisible to the human eye. Though those products less than impress me at over a grand, they do work, and I may put out some video I shot of my experiences with one soon just to show you. The Digital Crosshairs also works, but in reverse. They have made a digital lens cap out of a CCTV camera that is sensitive to IR. It looks down the scope as you normally do with your eye, then it projects that image on a little screen that sits next to the scope. Illumination is provided by an included IR flashlight, and a decent one that that.

The camera assembly attaches to the back of your scope, so instead of looking through it, you look at the screen.

The camera assembly attaches to the back of your scope, so instead of looking through it, you look at the screen.

It sounds great, but it isn’t as good as you would hope. They clearly robbed the CCTV lens system off of a standard driveway camera, and if you look at those cameras, the lenses on them are surrounded by IR LEDs. Without illumination, even under a cloudless starlit sky, the screen on Digital Crosshairs is black. This is fine if you are going to use it for hunting pigs and coyotes at night (well kinda as I’ll explain), but in a self defense situation, your enemy is also going to have night vision. When you use an illuminator, it is light pointing a flashlight at your enemy that says “HERE I AM.”

The other major downside is that the entire system is subject to moisture. In fact, the wiring for the system isn’t even covered. It is loose, and carried with the battery pack in a nylon sack along the side of the gun. I had a hard time finding a place for the sack while retaining access to my scope knobs, and the whole thing is just a disorganized mess.

During the day you also look at the screen, which means you can shoot around cover without having to put your head behind the gun.

During the day you also look at the screen, which means you can shoot around cover without having to put your head behind the gun.

The screen itself is mounted with a proprietary scope-type mount connected to the flashlight holder bracket. That bracket mounts to your scope tube, and it fits only a 1″ tube. I tried several positions for the system, on an AK-47 and then a Juggernaut Rogue bullpup M1A, which worked ok with the screen in the furthest forward position I could get. If you have a front sight on the gun, like the front triangle on an AR or the front sight of an AK, the glare from the IR flashlight makes the system unusable, so I would only use it on a flattop rifle of some sort, preferably with the screen mounted as far forward as possible.

Other than that, Digital Crosshairs works as promised. If the screen is screwed down tight it doesn’t move much under recoil, and there is a side benefit that you can shoot somewhat around corners. I had a hard time getting the camera to hold the reticle in focus when the scope was under magnification, but at 1x on this Nikon 223 scope it worked fine. There are videos on Youtube of the scope working under magnification at 100 yards, but I didn’t find that the focus on the flashlight worked like it should so 30 yards was the useful range. For me the final dealkiller on Digital Crosshairs is that the bright screen completely robs your natural nightvision. With any other type of NV device you are looking in with one eye. Close that eye that has been contracted by the light in the scope and your other eye has normal nightvision. Both eyes contract with Digital Crosshairs, so the night is much darker than it otherwise would be had you not looked at anything bright.

This is the Yukon scope, mounted on a 7.62x39 AR upper.

This is the Yukon scope, mounted on a 7.62×39 AR upper.

Yukon NVRS Titanium 1.5X42 Gen I Riflescope

There was no way I could do this article and include Digital Crosshairs without explaining why I think that the Yukon scope you see here in the pictures is the best night vision at its pricepoint. And I don’t think you need to spend more than $400! I have owned two of these scopes, and this newer one has small improvements over the original. My old one (which was stolen) used CR123A batteries, which are a pain, but this one uses AA size. The old one had small dots around the edges of the field of view. This one is clear. Other than that, the product has been rock solid and unchanged for over 5 years. They are made in Belarus, and they don’t even say Yukon on them. It looks like there is finally a new black version that will be sold under name “Firefield,” (which also won’t be printed on the scope), and the only major change seems to be that they went to a rail lock instead of thumb screws, and the magnification seems to have increased to 3x (I did just order one for a followup review). You have to love the simplicity of the Russians when it comes to optics. They are big, crude, heavy, but they really work.

The biggest difference between the Yukon and other NV riflescopes at this price range is that the Yukon has one set of batteries for both the scope and the IR illuminator.

The biggest difference between the Yukon and other NV riflescopes at this price range is that the Yukon has one set of batteries for both the scope and the IR illuminator.

What I like about the Yukon over the ATN and similar products at this pricepoint is that on the Yukon scope there is only one battery compartment to worry about, and only one on/off switch. The others, (like the Digital Crosshairs), include a separate flashlight alongside the main body of the scope, and it requires its own set of batteries and has to be turned off separately. I used to own the ATN at this pricepoint, but it also was stolen with my original Yukon. Before that I had on several occasions forgotten to turn off the IR and it was dead when I went back to use it again.

The other thing is that the Yukon gives you a nice field of view, 20 degrees, out to at least 200 yards under clear skies. The illuminator is integral and shoots down the exact line of sight that the scope does, but you really don’t need it unless the night is totally black, or you are indoors in total darkness.

There is also only one on/off switch, and as you can see, the controls for IR are just one more flip down from on. The reticle brightness is right next to it, and the scope is zeroed with dials like normal.

There is also only one on/off switch, and as you can see, the controls for IR are just one more flip down from on. The reticle brightness is right next to it, and the scope is zeroed with dials like normal.

What are the downsides to a dedicated night vision scope compared to something like Digital Crosshairs or one of the other digital night vision devices? One is that in full light, the Yukon crosshairs are very hard to see. It relies on a pinhole lensecover to reduce the amount of light coming into the device, and in full sunlight the red crosshairs are very faint. The other big downside is that if your batteries are dead, you have no sighting device at all. The scope is off and you can’t see through it. With a removable device you at least always have your scope. This Yukon is probably the smallest dedicated night vision scope I have seen, but even it leaves very little room on the rail for backup sights. Right now I have it on a 7.62×39 upper, but I may move it to one of my other ARs that has a full top rail with plenty of room for offset backups and maybe a laser backup as well.

For the Prepared

It was hard to get a good picture through the Yukon, but here is what the reticle looks like. During full bright sunlight it is hard to make out, but it holds zero perfectly.

It was hard to get a good picture through the Yukon, but here is what the reticle looks like. During full bright sunlight it is hard to make out, but it holds zero perfectly.

If you are one of the thousands of people who have followed this Prepping 101 column, most likely you already understand that it won’t be enough to have guns when the collapse finally comes. You really have to spend some time, money, and storage space on food, water, medicine, cooking stuff, etc., if you want to have a shot at survival. But don’t discount your security requirements just because you have a gun. Granted, $400 is a lot of money, but this is one investment I would make now if you can, rather than wait to see if things get worse. Money is going to get scarcer now as the beginning of the collapse unfolds, but when it finally gets to the point of no return, things like this Yukon won’t get cheaper (like gasoline and bank loans). They will cease to be available. I don’t suggest you buy a Digital Crosshairs, but get one of these Yukon scopes while you still can.

The best position for the Digital Crosshairs was as far forward as possible on this M1A Rogue bullpup.

The best position for the Digital Crosshairs was as far forward as possible on this M1A Rogue bullpup.

The package includes chargers for both the Li-Ion battery as well as the flashlight battery, and an extra flashlight battery in case you leave it on.

The package includes chargers for both the Li-Ion battery as well as the flashlight battery, and an extra flashlight battery in case you leave it on.

This is the mess of wires that is inside that black hang sack on the side of the gun.

This is the mess of wires that is inside that black hang sack on the side of the gun.

I had problems with the front sight of the AK shining back and messing up the picture, so I changed guns.

I had problems with the front sight of the AK shining back and messing up the picture, so I changed guns.

A good view of what the daylight version of the picture looks like. I had problems with glare on the screen.

A good view of what the daylight version of the picture looks like. I had problems with glare on the screen.

The Yukon looks big and cumbersome on an AR, but it is actually quite manageable.

The Yukon looks big and cumbersome on an AR, but it is actually quite manageable.

The Yukon is made in Belarus, and this version has been around pretty much the same for many years.

The Yukon is made in Belarus, and this version has been around pretty much the same for many years.

This is the newer version, and for some reason they made it 3x instead of 1.5x which I prefer for close quarters out to the effective range of this scope.

This is the newer version, and for some reason they made it 3x instead of 1.5x which I prefer for close quarters out to the effective range of this scope.

Windage and elevation on the Yukon are just like on a normal scope.

Windage and elevation on the Yukon are just like on a normal scope.

Digital Crosshairs is clearly made from a repurposed CCTV driveway camera.

Digital Crosshairs is clearly made from a repurposed CCTV driveway camera.

{ 51 comments… add one }
  • Ryan November 2, 2017, 8:11 am

    One of the great reviews in Google on Cheap Night Vision Riflescopes! Now, I can take my decision to buy the Cheap Night Vision Riflescopes. You are very helpful and I am pleased to read the review. Thank you so much and keep helping us as always!

  • Josh March 13, 2017, 3:14 pm

    It’s really important to have a night vision scope, perfect that you brought it up since most preppers often forget about this. I’ve invested in a Yukon scope that you recommended in this post, and I couldn’t be happier. Thank you!

  • Rem870 December 28, 2016, 10:59 am

    Very good review but Gen 1 is useless without IR illumination. And your IR illumination will be visible to everyone using night vision.

  • leshay November 6, 2016, 9:24 pm

    My dad is a prepper and I want to get him a prepping christmas gift. Are there any decent night vision scopes or night vision binoculars that I could buy for under $100?

  • DAVID STANLEY November 6, 2016, 6:59 am

    There is a website named OPTICSPLANET.COM that has many pages of background info on NV optics. They also sell them, and I think their prices are very high, but their info is free. I am debating putting large IR spotlights around my house. My best friend owns about 40 acres out in the sand hills of SC. He has just been inundated with coyotes the last few months and just has an old 20 gau. pump shotgun that belonged to his grandfather who bought it used. He has a flashlight duct taped to it. He walks around several hundred yds. from his house at night. I keep telling him one night he will buy the farm doing that. He retired at 55 yr. old and I know he has over a million bucks in his retirement accounts ,but he will squeeze a nickel until it squeaks I took a Ruger 10-22 with 3 BX-25 mags today and loaned them to his wife until she can go this week and buy her own. I took my wife with me, she is 5ft 2in. 120 lbs. and can make that little Ruger sing a song almost. My friends wife cussed him out and laid the law down. He is mad at me at the moment, but I told him I hope it is a long and healthy hate..

  • Henry October 9, 2016, 4:50 pm

    The Digital Crosshairs night vision clip-on has continued to improve. You can see the latest models and customer reviews at http://www.digitalcrosshairs.net

  • Isita Peterson September 3, 2016, 2:09 pm

    Thanks for putting it together, it makes it a lot easier to make an informed decision. That is a very thorough review full of great information. Loved it

  • Robert L. Peterson September 3, 2016, 11:00 am

    Thanks for review night vision scopes. I think Yukon is suitable for me. Night vision scope is must needed

  • Kevin June 12, 2016, 11:23 pm

    Thanks for helpful post. Finding a night vision scope for this season, yukon is good for me, you get what you pay for!

  • Simon April 25, 2016, 8:41 pm

    That is a very thorough review full of great information. Thanks for putting it together, it makes it a lot easier to make an informed decision.

  • James April 3, 2016, 5:52 pm

    Great info, thanks for putting this together. I’m considering getting a night vision scope for my AR-15, I think it would make a great addition to my current optic arsenal.

  • Nick January 29, 2016, 7:01 pm

    I don’t know why anyone would pay that much to turn their scope into digital NV. You can buy a dedicated digital NV scope that’s as good as Gen1 and don’t have to worry about tubes. I decided to try the photon 4.6 from sightmark which I picked up for $450 and I have to say it’s awesome for the price. When the moons out (even when cloudy) you don’t even need the IR on. I got a cheap external IR to save batteries but even on my 38 acres there is always some light somewhere that makes the external IR overkill. The reviews on this scope are high as well. I can easily ID critters out to 150+ yards. I had it sighted in at 100 yrd in three shots. You can use in the daytime but it’s kinda bright though.

  • Tim December 21, 2015, 11:22 am

    Thank you for your review. I have a Yukon Gen 3 that needs some repair, but can’t find anyone to repair it. Any ideas would be very helpful.

  • gb December 21, 2015, 9:56 am

    If IR is invisible to human and animal eyes how is it a here I am shoot me problem? The red glow is the problem? What about the trail cameras that claim to have no visible light at all but have a IR source?

    • Alan December 21, 2015, 11:20 am

      It’s other people with NV that will clearly see your IR illuminator, and where it is coming from.

  • Henry December 10, 2015, 11:05 pm

    To the comment above, animals and humans can not see IR light. You can see a slight red glow from the illuminator but not the light being shot at you. Also, no Gen1 can compare with any Digital night vision system. Do your own research.

  • Michael Robledo May 12, 2015, 11:11 am

    About night vision, I’ve used all the military has had to offer between 84-2005 and I can say it’s come a long way , but it’s still not all that. A NV/Thermal combo would be optimal. NV ;Put it up against someone in a guillie suit and it’s basically useless, you won’t see them right in front of you. Or someone else with a gen3 NV, he will spot you before you see him especially if he’s using a passive scope which uses no light source. A least with a clip on NV from a hidden position you can scan and eliminate the threat without ever exposing yourself. Also, I’ve been told that hogs and other animals can see the IR light ……Just food for thought .

  • leonard stuart February 26, 2015, 9:29 am

    Please share the info on the monitor screen you use t
    he exact info on the model no.etc.having are hard time figuring out the right one to order.
    thanks in advance.

  • Glen Jage February 23, 2015, 4:46 pm

    No response??

  • Glen Jage February 19, 2015, 1:24 pm

    In the market for a product to assist in night hunting coyotes. Curious as to why you recommend this Yukon compared to these others.
    Yukon NVRS Tactical 2.5X50 with Internal Focusing Night Vision Riflescope or
    Yukon Nvrs Titanium 2.5X50 Varmint Hunter Night Vision Riflescope

    Is it due purely to the pricepoint? Any additional pros or cons would be appreciated, I am on the beginning of my learning curve and dont want to be unhappy with a purchase.

    Thanks!

  • robert p February 18, 2015, 7:15 pm

    Confused due to no scope experience at all. Dan commented that only Gen 3 scopes provide adequate level of security against IR illuminators viewing downrange. Do all NV scopes have illuminators that have that unwanted potential? How about the expensive thermal scopes? Do either have trouble with foggy conditions or shadows in the day time? My goal is to find and track small game such as a hog or coyote traveling in a wash at night with brush around. I was all set to buy the Yukon scope on Amazon then I read Dan’s article. He seems knowledgable and I would like to comment on his post as well as this one. I prefer to spend $400 but can spend $4000 if I need to do that. Dan’s comment “HERE I AM, SHOOT ME” beacon” really got my attention. Please comment on validity and on suggested alternatives.

    • Henry February 18, 2015, 9:06 pm

      Robert- Thermal scopes read heat signatures and require no IR illumination or light of any kind. Thermal can detect behind brush and through fog or smoke. Since thermal is reading heat, and displaying the different heat signatures, under some conditions it does not work well. If you are around a large building that is giving off a high heat signature, other object close to it may not be visible. If you are in Texas on a very hot night, some animals you are hunting may blend in with other things in the hot environment. Thermal will see your hog behind brush but you will not see the brush with some of the less expensive, but still expensive thermal units. Thermal will not give off any light and is not visible to your prey or opponent.

      GEN 1,2,3 uses intensifier tube technology (I2) to turn IR light which is invisible to the human eye into a visible image. IR light is available from stars and moon light naturally in the environment. GEN 3 is better at turning IR light into a visible image than GEN 2 or 1. No I2 technology can see in total darkness, they use IR light. All I2 technology is there for improved by providing additional IR light using illuminators, that is why most of them have built in illuminators.

      Then other IR night vision technology is digital night vision. Digital night vision uses CMOS IR board camera technology to turn IR light into visible images instead of intensifier tubes. That is what we use with Digital Crosshairs. This is the same technology used in your CCTV system. This digital technology is getting better and better every few months just like your cell phones and computers do. All your major night vision manufacturers have a digital night vision model now and they are all based on the same technology as night vision security cameras but they put a small, close to eye LCD in the eye piece of their scope, we mount it on the guns rail system. They all require an IR illuminator and the stronger it is the better they perform. Digital night vision is black and white, unlike I2 technology which is green.

      I hope this helps.

  • rgmeddn February 17, 2015, 4:47 pm

    The Amazon link provided says 1.5x, which makes it look like the old model, yet 2 AA batteries, which looks like the new model. Anybody have a clarification?

  • Dan February 17, 2015, 3:01 am

    Gen 1 is better than nothing. And that is ALL that can be said about it. It works only marginally under moonlight and is almost useless in moonless conditions without IR illumination……a flashlight. This MIGHT be OK if your hog hunting
    at night etc. But for real world work against attackers that IR illuminator is a gigantic ” HERE I AM, SHOOT ME” beacon.
    I own examples of all three types of NV Gen 1, 2 and 3. And when the balloon goes up and I have to defend myself in the dark the ONLY NV I will consider is Gen 3.

    • Henry February 17, 2015, 4:01 pm

      Hi Dan-
      Digital Crosshairs is my product. Since you own GEN1-3 night vision products I would like to get your opinion on the quality of the night vision provided using my clip-on product. This Youtube video was shot at about 100 yards using a 4x magnification on the scope with my DC800 clip-on and the 850nm IR illuminator provided with the system.

      http://youtu.be/hq1lSoV5PDw

      What do you think? This is designed for hunting.

    • Jim December 21, 2015, 8:15 am

      Agreed. I was in a full belly laugh reading about how gen 3 wasn’t impressive! I have owned them all and gen1 is ok in a moon lit field but get it in the woods or urban with shadows, depth and changing light and your basically blind or shooting at fuzzy blobs moving around. Never mind patrolling, driving, designating friend from foe etc… I will stick with a dbal and genIII+ helmet mount personally. Fell bad for the people reading this that don’t know any better.

      • Carter December 21, 2015, 10:54 am

        For the people who cannot afford a get a gen three device, a gen 1 probably is better than nothing. They won’t win a gunfight against you head on (if you’re using gen three), but it could be the difference between them hitting or missing if they get the chance to shoot you in the back.

  • Kulafarmer February 16, 2015, 8:27 pm

    Thanks for reviewing this, saw it on FTTWR
    Been wanting to get some sort of NV JIC
    But really couldnt stomach dumping over 2k into something I may never use, but like i said Just In Case (JIC)
    Can stick the Yukon on an AR dedicated for night use, not ideal but better than being SOL and having people sneaking on us at night

  • Stephen A Espe February 16, 2015, 7:22 pm

    Is there some reason Amazon won’t ship to California? Have the Sacramento Dick Heads screwed me once again, while I wasn’t watching?

    • Joe February 17, 2015, 4:01 pm

      CA law prohibits any night vision device to be mounted on a firearm that relies on projecting an IR beam for it to work; yes, the Socialist Democratically controlled legislature of the Peoples Republik of Kalifornia have srewed you once again

  • Michael February 16, 2015, 1:32 pm

    I own the Digital Cross-hairs camera system. I am a disabled hunter and because of the way I have to hold a rifle it is impossible for me to see through a scope. I purchased this product because similar products for the disabled sportsman cost $1500 and up. This product allows me to switch between guns and adjust the screen as needed. I hunt deer and turkey and haven’t used it at night. I think it’s a great product I would like to see a camera that was not night vision capable for better results during full day light. I think they are on to something but maybe targeting the wrong market.

  • Norm February 16, 2015, 1:16 pm

    I’m a prepper “newbie” and have never used a night vision scope. Will the Yukon work O.K. mounted on a Colt A4 with its high front sight? Any problems getting it sighted in? I use a Leupold Zero Point for boresighting scopes on bolt rifles, but it is blocked by the tall A4 sight and thus useless on that model. Would the Yukon have the same problem? Thanks.

    • Norm February 16, 2015, 1:29 pm

      Oops! My error. The weapon in question is a Colt M4 carbine, not an “A4”. I always think of the elevated front sight as an “A-frame” sight, hence the error. Sorry for the confusion.

      • Administrator February 16, 2015, 2:02 pm

        I just checked and you can see the front sight through the Yukon but the IR misses it due to it being off to the right.

  • dave February 16, 2015, 1:09 pm

    Ebay has them

  • Race February 16, 2015, 12:20 pm

    Thanks for the review. I have been pricing night vision options for about two years now, and couldn’t find a good review for a moderately priced system. Looks like I will be saving my money for the Yukon system. Thanks again!

  • Gil February 16, 2015, 11:59 am

    Good review. Thanks for the info…

  • Ray S. February 16, 2015, 11:18 am

    Where can I buy one? are they sold at major gun shops?? Cabela’s , Bass Pro?? etc. or others??

    • Administrator February 16, 2015, 11:21 am

      This is the internet. There is an amazon link at the top.

  • Dan February 16, 2015, 11:07 am

    I appreciate the honesty, hate losing money & resources, no matter how much you have. Great job.

  • Marc February 16, 2015, 10:42 am

    Did you happen to check repeat accuracy by removing and reinstalling the Yukon gen 1?

  • Howard Sizemore February 16, 2015, 9:28 am

    I had one of the older models that was absolutely awful to get sighted in, it had the red dot laser as the sighting device, no crosshairs at all. I sold it along with the rifle it was mounted onto and am thinking of purchasing this new model. Does this one have adjustable crosshairs, windage / elevation on it. I like the idea of AA batteries also. Thanks, Howard

    • Administrator February 16, 2015, 9:31 am

      Yes it explains that there are normal scope turrets with caps.

  • larry February 16, 2015, 9:10 am

    In your opinion what would you say is a realistic max range of the yukon scope?
    Thank you.
    Larry

    • Administrator February 16, 2015, 9:18 am

      If you dial the crosshairs really low on a clear night you definitely can make out moving figures 500 yards away.

  • Henry February 16, 2015, 9:05 am

    Some advantages of Digital Crosshairs were missed. Digital Crosshairs will give you better night vision range than any Gen1 device hands down. It also gives you the ability to mount it on multiple guns in your collection without re-sighting them. You can use it in the day light or at night. If your batteries fail, you can remove it in minutes and still have access to your scope. It is also made in the U.S. which matters to some people.

  • R.D. Grey February 16, 2015, 8:52 am

    You mentioned that you also owned an ATN. How would you compare it to the Yukon model ?

    • Administrator February 16, 2015, 9:20 am

      The ATN had quite a few dark spots, but this would now be a 4-5 year old model.

  • Jim February 16, 2015, 8:23 am

    Thanks to your review, I finally found something in my price range.
    When money is available, I plan on getting a Yukon. I appreciate your efforts.

    • Henry February 1, 2017, 11:06 pm

      Buying GEN 1 really is a bad choice no matter whose product you buy. Why?

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