Sig Sauer’s Single Action Sensation: The P226 Elite SAO

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That's right, there's no decocking lever on this Sig P226!

That’s right, there’s no decocking lever on this Sig P226!

I like action. Who doesn’t?

Single action. Traditional double action. Double action only. Striker-fired action. I like ‘em all. But I especially like single action handguns. Having only one thing to do, release the hammer, single actions tend to be easier to shoot accurately. Repeatable accuracy leads to confidence, and confidence is something I want in spades if I’m carrying a gun for protection.

With that goal in mind – a carry gun that inspires confidence – I checked out the new Sig Sauer Elite SAO. Unlike most traditional Sig Sauer pistols, this one is a single action – kind of like a 1911.

The safety levers on this model are ambidextrous and of equal size on both sides.

The safety levers on this model are ambidextrous and of equal size on both sides.

Its got an ambidextrous safety lever. You carry it cocked and locked. In fact, outside of cosmetic differences, one of the few observable things different from a 1911 is that the Sig has a hinged trigger while the 1911’s trigger moves straight back like a sliding door.

OK, so that’s some gross over-simplification. The Sig P226 Elite SAO has classic Sig internals – not the hinged recoil action and barrel bushing we’re accustomed to seeing in a 1911. Yet it offers the benefits of a constant, light trigger to aid in accurate shooting. Unlike the 1911, it offers a double stack magazine so you get 15 rounds of ammo, plus an extra in the chamber. Oh yeah, and it’s chambered in 9mm, not .45 ACP.

I keep mentioning 1911’s as a comparison, but if you want to get more specific, you can think of the Sig P226 Elite SAO as a combat version of the P226 X-5 Competition. While the X-5 Competition models are built as elite pistols for professional competitors, they’re not necessarily suited for defensive or combat use. You’ll find allen screws all over the place on a competition X-5 model as the design allows specific adjustment to nearly every aspect of the gun’s operation. Trigger weight, trigger travel, trigger over travel, trigger shape, magazine well style, compensators, flux capacitors and so on. You can also find similarity with the P226 X-5 Tactical model, but the Elite SAO has a 4.4 inch barrel instead of 5 inches. Corresponding overall length dimensions are shorter and weight of the Elite SAO is about one ounce less.

The two-piece grips are very similar in feel to the new E2 single-piece grips.

The two-piece grips are very similar in feel to the new E2 single-piece grips.

What the P226 Elite SAO does have in common with the X-5 models are a single action design and a specially contoured grip. Like the new Sig one-piece E2 grips, the contour on the Elite SAO is more rounded and offers a shorter trigger reach to better fit a variety of hands. Unlike the E2 models, the grips are two-piece on the Elite SAO. Want to talk your favorite custom stock maker into fitting some cocobolo’s to your Elite SAO? Go for it!

Rather than blathering on about what the Sig P226 Elite SAO is like and unlike, let’s get to the details.

Just the specs

Caliber9MM
Overall Length8.2 in
Overall Height5.5 in
Overall Width1.7 in
Barrel Length4.4 in
Sight Radius6.3 in
Weight w/Magazine34.4 oz
Magazine Capacity15 Rounds
Trigger Pull SAO5.0 lbs
Part NumberE26R-9-BSE-SAO
The Sig P226 Elite SAO comes in a hard plastic case that's ready for padlocks.

The Sig P226 Elite SAO comes in a hard plastic case that’s ready for padlocks.

You’ll get this pistol in a hard plastic, foam-lined hard plastic case that has two holes for padlocks, so the case is legal for TSA transportation of your pistol if you add your own locks. In addition to the two magazines, Sig includes a cable gun lock so you can safely store your pistol when not in use. A comprehensive P226 family owners manual rounds out the package.

The Sig P226 Elite SAO is an all metal (except the grip panels) gun. The fridge magnet test told me the frame is, in fact, aluminum alloy, not steel. The slide is stainless steel with a black hard-coat anodized (Nitron) finish. You’ll find that the magazines are all steel as well, except for the follower, which appears to be made of some sort of polymer. One thing I like about steel magazines like these is that you can count on them to drop free of their own accord when you punch the magazine release button. They’re just not as susceptible to bulging like plastic magazines. The magazines have witness holes at the 5, 10 and 15 capacity marks so you can clearly see approximate remaining round count. The 15 round indicator hole tells you when you’re done filling the magazine.

The P226 Elite SAO comes standard with SigLite Night Sights. All three dots, two in the rear sight and one in the front, are fitted with tritium inserts for constant visibility in dark conditions. One other thing you’ll notice about the rear sight – it’s got a vertical front edge so you can rack the slide using it as a catch on a belt, boot or another hard surface.

The trigger face is wide, smooth and well rounded for long shooting sessions.

The trigger face is wide, smooth and well rounded for long shooting sessions.

As the name implies, the trigger is a single action design. Like other Sig models, it’s hinged and offers a wide and well-rounded face. Unlike those of unnamed polymer guns, this trigger is smooth and comfortable on the finger. For a few shots, that doesn’t matter a whole lot. When shooting lots of rounds in a match or extended practice session, you’ll be thankful for the well polished trigger face. The inside of the trigger guard is also smooth so the knuckle side of your trigger finger won’t get torn up during recoil.

Using some mad rough estimation skills, I figure there is over ¼ inch of take up before you feel significant trigger pressure. It breaks clean within about another 1/16th inch of pull. Using a simple trigger scale, I repeatedly measured trigger break force at just about 5 pounds. The Sig brochure also indicates a 5 pound pull, so this was right on target.

The P226 Elite SAO has ambidextrous safety levers of equal size, so there’s no predisposition to right or left-handed shooting as far as safety activation is concerned. Engagement of the safety lever blocks the trigger but does not lock the hammer or slide. This means that you can perform administrative functions like loading, unloading, racking the slide to show clear and more while the safety is engaged. This is a great feature and came in really handy during the recent Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun competition. “Load and make ready” and “unload and show clear” commands from the range safety officers were all performed with the safety on. You can even do a chamber check to verify presence of a cartridge while the safety is engaged. This is a really nice feature.

A couple of holster options for the Sig P226 Elite SAO

Galco's HALO holster worked great when I equipped the P226 with a Crimson Trace Rail Master Pro light and laser.

Galco’s HALO holster worked great when I equipped the P226 with a Crimson Trace Rail Master Pro light and laser.

Outside of range testing and lots of plinking, the first thing I did with this pistol was outfit it for the Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational. I figured it would be a great way to give the gun a decent workout to see how it runs. As standard Lasergrips won’t fit due to the safety levers, I elected to install a Crimson Trace Rail Master Pro on the Picatinny rail. The Rail Master Pro offers 100 lumen light and a laser in an integrated unit. Unlike other traditional weapon lights, the Rail Master Pro is more rectangular in shape to fit the light and laser in a compact package, so I knew finding a suitable holster was going to be a challenge.

Consulting with the folks at Galco, we figured that the Galco Halo model should work, even though it’s technically cut for a tubular weapon light. The holster secures the gun with a molded fit to the slide and trigger area, but offers a generous space under the rail section of the holster for lights. Sure enough, the holster worked fine with the Rail Master Pro. I did have to do a little extra break in by covering the (unloaded!) P226 and Rail Master Pro with Ziploc bags and working the leather from the inside. Once that was done, I was good to go. A side tip here – if you have a sticky holster, get a bottle of Draw-Ez Holster Lubricant. It won’t slime up your nice holster but will instantly cure a sticky draw motion.

While I was at it, I tried two other lights that I had handy to see how the Halo worked with the P226 Elite SAO. The standard Crimson Trace Rail Master light is smaller and more rounded than the Pro model and worked like a champ. So did a Streamlight TLR-1 that I had sitting around. While the Halo has a retention strap, it’s really not needed as the fit is solid. So if you’re looking for an outside the waistband holster for the Sig P226 Elite SAO that accommodates a rail mounted light or laser, check out the Galco Halo.

I tried three different rail-mounted lights with the Sig and Galco HALO. All fit just fine.

I tried three different rail-mounted lights with the Sig and Galco HALO. All fit just fine.

For daily carry, I prefer an inside the waistband holster, so I ordered a Galco V-Hawk IWB holster. Yeah, I know, those of you who are holster encyclopedias know that Galco doesn’t make a V-Hawk for the Sig P226. You’re right. However, for a nominal fee, Galco will make you a custom holster for your specific gun, within reason. So give them a call before throwing in the towel on a hard-to-find combination of holster and gun.

The V-Hawk is a great option for the Sig P226 Elite SAO. As a metal full-sized gun, loaded with 15+1 rounds of 9mm, it’s got some weight, just over 2 ½ pounds loaded according to my quasi-accurate scale. As a result, you need a solid holster to support it properly. The Galco V-Hawk is a steer hide IWB holster with a reinforced top for easy re-holstering. The standard configuration uses leather snap loops to attach to your belt, but it ships with clips that convert the holster into a tuckable model. Like most Galco leather holsters, it’s made tight so you’ll want to break it in using the Ziploc method mentioned above.

Shooting the Sig Sauer P226 Elite SAO

The short story is that this is an exceptionally easy gun to shoot accurately. Its weight and rounded grip profile, combined with the relatively tame 9mm, make it a pleasure to shoot. If you made me decide on the spot, I would say it’s the softest shooting 9mm pistol I’ve shot. While comfort is nice, that really matters for more important things like getting back on target quickly after breaking a shot. Shooting the recent Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Competition with this pistol was a great validation of its ability to absorb recoil and get off quick, but accurate shots. I didn’t beat 3 Gun Jedi Daniel Horner from the Army Marksmanship Unit, but it wasn’t the pistol’s fault.

American Eagle 9mm 147 grain flat point ammo turned out to be a great solution for competition shooting with a 951 fps velocity from this gun.

American Eagle 9mm 147 grain flat point ammo turned out to be a great solution for competition shooting with a 951 fps velocity from this gun.

Prior to the match, I ran a variety of 9mm ammo, both practice and premium defensive, through the gun to check velocity performance and it’s ease of shooting accurately. For function testing, I shot at least a dozen types of 9mm ranging from inexpensive practice ammo to high-end premium self-defense ammunition. I used steel cased, brass cased, light bullet, heavy bullet, lead, hollow point, flat point, round nose – you name it. When the Sig P226 ate all that without a hiccup, I dumped a pile of each ammo type on the shooting bench, mixed up the cartridges, and started loading mixed magazines. For example, a Hornady Critical Duty 135 grain cartridge might be followed by a Tula 115 grain steel case practice round, and so on. No matter, I’m still waiting on my first malfunction with this gun.

As a range visit isn’t much of a workout for gun function, I also took it to the Crimson Trace Midnight 3 Gun Invitational competition. Located many miles from nowhere in the high desert outside Bend, Oregon, this gun got filthy. Dust coats everything, and dropping mags into the dry dirt immediately coats the insides with grit. I performed no cleaning or maintenance through the week and the gun ran just fine, although loading magazines made a sound reminiscent of finger nailed scraping a chalkboard from all the grit.

During the match, I used American Eagle 9mm 147 grain flat point (AE9FP) ammunition. I chose this variety as the heavier bullet, moving at 900+ feet per second, should offer more controllable recoil and allow for quicker target transitions. I chronographed this load from the Sig before the match and it averaged 951 feet per second. Perfect for my needs. This ammo was great for competition. Reliable, low blast and manageable recoil. Check it out.

I tested a wide variety of 9mm practice and defense ammo, all with the Crimson Trace Rail Master Pro mounted. The rail device did not have any impact on function.

I tested a wide variety of 9mm practice and defense ammo, all with the Crimson Trace Rail Master Pro mounted. The rail device did not have any impact on function.

For the “ease of shooting accurately” portion of my testing, I didn’t use a Ransom Rest, so I’m making no claims about the gun’s mechanical ability. Rather, I wanted to see how it performed for the shooter.

I shot it from a Caldwell Pistolero rest. This is a plastic device that supports frame and the base of the magazine well. While light, you can put boxes of ammo or a bag of lead on it and you have a portable, but stable shooting platform.

I used a little trick to help remove error from exact sight alignment. I printed up some 4.67 inch square, solid black targets. As the front sight of the Sig P226 Elite SAO is .14 inches wide, it appears to be, you guessed it, 4.67 inches wide at a distance of 25 yards. Superimpose the squares represented by the front sight and the target, and you’ve got a perfect sight picture. I wanted to be precise as possible, so I used an EyePal Peep Sighting System that focuses your vision through a small hole, thereby sharpening near (front sight) and far (downrange targets) objects. The combination of custom targets and an aperture peep sight aid made a pretty good solution for shooting accurate groups.

Here are the velocity and 25 yard accuracy results:

AmmunitionVelocity (fps)Group (5 shots, 25 yards)
American Eagle 147 grain FMJ flat point9512.27″
Buffalo Bore 95 grain Barnes TAC-XP1,4571.46″
Federal 115 grain FMJ1,1822.08″
Freedom Munitions 115 grain RN remanufactured1,1833.11″
Hornady Critical Defense 115 grain FTX1,1122.17″
Hornady Critical Duty 135 grain Flexlock1,1320.97″
Remington Ultimate Defense Compact Handgun1,1441.99″
Remington UMC 115 grain FMJ1,1673.20″
Speer Gold Dot 124 grain1,1391.81″
Speer Gold Dot 124 grain +P1,2231.71″
TulAmmo 115 grain FMJ1,1623.26″
Winchester Supreme Elite PDX1 124 grain +P1,2382.68″
Winchester Target 115 grain FMJ1,2093.53″
Handload 125 grain Lead RN (3.4 gr Unique, 1.115 OAL)9642.67″

As you can see, this gun will shoot, and I’m sure results would have been even better using a mechanical rest.

One thing I noticed is that average velocities of many 9mm loads from the Sig P226 Elite SAO were noticeably higher than those same loads fired from other pistols with similar barrel length. Why? Got me, I have a question in to the Sig engineering team to see if they know why. I wasn’t able to slug the barrels to check for interior diameter differences. If I find and explanation, I’ll update the article.

Closing thoughts

The P226 Elite SAO is an exceptionally comfortable gun to shoot. The weight of the all metal gun, combined with relatively soft shooting 9mm, certainly helps. What really makes the difference is the grip design. The rounded profile allows more of the grip surface to engage with your shooting hand, thereby increasing your ability to control the gun and absorb recoil. If you want to shoot a lot, this is one to check out. It’s a proven combat gun (see Mk25 military cousins) yet it’s also well suited for home defense, competition and just plain plinking. It’s a keeper.

Suggested Retail for the Sig Sauer P226 Elite SAO is $1,243.00. As a reference, the retail price of the standard P226 model is $1,108.00 including the SigLite night sights option.

The safety levers are identical on both sides. As you can see, the Sig Lite sights are plenty clear in the daytime too.

The safety levers are identical on both sides. As you can see, the Sig Lite sights are plenty clear in the daytime too.

Front slide serrations are there if you like using them for press checks.

Front slide serrations are there if you like using them for press checks.

The business end.

The business end.

The beefy extractor is on the outside.

The beefy extractor is on the outside.

Front and rear sights all come with tritium inserts.

Front and rear sights all come with tritium inserts.

Note the profile of the rear sight. In a pinch, you can cock the slide by hooking it on a belt or sharp surface.

Note the profile of the rear sight. In a pinch, you can cock the slide by hooking it on a belt or sharp surface.

Fine serration on the front of the grip helps avoid slipping without tearing up your hands.

Fine serration on the front of the grip helps avoid slipping without tearing up your hands.

This model includes a Picatinny rail for attachment of lights, lasers, can openers - whatever.

This model includes a Picatinny rail for attachment of lights, lasers, can openers – whatever.

Like a 1911, you carry the Sig P226 Elite SAO cocked and locked. Note the big beavertail.

Like a 1911, you carry the Sig P226 Elite SAO cocked and locked. Note the big beavertail.

You can keep the safety engaged while manipulating the slide.

You can keep the safety engaged while manipulating the slide.

The guts.

The guts.

Field stripped for cleaning.

Field stripped for cleaning.

The barrel includes an integrated feed ramp.

The barrel includes an integrated feed ramp.

Two-piece grips are attached with two flathead screws per side.

Two-piece grips are attached with two flathead screws per side.

Slide-lock view from the right side.

Slide-lock view from the right side.

This pistol really liked Hornady Critical Duty 135 grain ammo - this 5-shot, 25-yard group measured just .97 inches.

This pistol really liked Hornady Critical Duty 135 grain ammo – this 5-shot, 25-yard group measured just .97 inches.

{ 28 comments… add one }
  • Bryant September 15, 2017, 7:05 am

    My hasband just bought a Sig P228 (M11). I am a 1911 fan, and I was happy with her selection. As soon as I picked it up, I felt right at home. The weapon performed flawlessly. The sights came right back on target and rapid fire was a breeze.

  • Haley June 16, 2017, 11:44 pm

    Shoulder holster is very handy to carry guns away.

  • Dmcneelus February 5, 2016, 5:50 pm

    I have had a Sig P220 Elite in bi-tone for several years in SAO. It shoots as my 1911 in small groups and does extremely well when moving. I also have a P228 in 9 mm. I have several glocks and SA XD’s.and all shoot very well. I would not own a firearm I was not willing to bet my or my family’s life on. Sig is worth the money. Shoot well and keep your powder dry my friends

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  • Harry Frank September 18, 2014, 11:26 am

    I like single-action also–but not in anything that was designed after 1873. The new Sig costs about double what I paid for my P239. Rather like super-sport cars. Porsche or Lamborghini is happy remove amenities like upholstery, radio, power door locks . . . and tack $200,000 to the price tag. The DA capability and decocking system were big factors in my choosing the P239 and selling my Coonan .357. I feel about cock-and-lock about the same as I’d feel carrying a hand grenade with a loose pin in my jock strap.

  • Joshua Williams September 17, 2014, 2:19 pm

    I prefer the added safety of decocking my carry pistol. There are two reasons. The first, a harder initial trigger pull will make accidental/premature discharge less likely. In high stress situations, drawing/firing in a hurry, which is how I predict most defense situations to go, add to the risk. But then there’s the SAO issue of a misfire. It doesn’t happen often, but sometimes the pin hits the round and it doesn’t go off. It’s happened to me at the range even after cleaning and firing a few mags. It just happens, and debris from every day carrying can add to the possibility. With SA/DA pistols, you can still use DA after a misfire to restrike the round, which in my experience has always fired the round and cycled the gun. Pulling back the slide to chamber a new round, especially after the first round’s primer has been struck and still may go off, just doesn’t vibe well with me. Add that to a self defense situation and you could have one hell of a bad time on your hands. That’s why I will never carry a single action only firearm. Thoughts?

  • Dale McNeeley September 16, 2014, 2:26 pm

    Sig does – or did make the P220 in SAO. I have one that will shoot the eyes out of a fly and the .45 is a perfect for the Sig. Yes, the price is steep and yes, I have some Glocks, but I keep going to the P220 and P228 as my constant carry.

  • Lastboyscout September 15, 2014, 8:01 pm

    My wife just bought a Sig 226 Elite. Of course I have to try it out. I am a 1911 fan, and I was happy with her selection. As soon as I picked it up, I felt right at home. The weapon performed flawlessly. The sights came right back on target and rapid fire was a breeze. I love this weapon! The only thing I had to get use to was firing 15 rounds without re-loading. The magazine drops out without any problem. The price is salty compared with other pistols (she has a Champagne taste), but I’m telling you, your not wasting your money if your purchase this pistol. I can’t say enough about the 226. Oh, by the way, don’t mess with my wife, boy can she shoot!

  • cmehere September 15, 2014, 11:37 am

    It’s the Germans superior engineering that makes these guns worth the extra money over a plastic POS! Sigs are there when you need them. That’s why lots of seals carry the 226’s. When it’s time to rock, does it matter the cost? Easy to strip and clean, can go on and on. ..

  • cmehere September 15, 2014, 11:36 am

    It’s the Germans superior engineering that makes these guns worth the extra money over a plastic POS! Sigs are there when you need them. That’s why lots of seals carry the 226’s. When it’s time to rock, does it matter the cost? Easy to strip and clean, can go on and on. ..

  • Todd September 15, 2014, 11:02 am

    it’s funny how everyone tries to compare their guns to 1911’s, and I am surprised the author doesn’t seem to know that you can get doublestack mags with 1911’s and that you can also get them in 9mm. and then goes on to talking about conceal carry as if the 226 was a good ccw weapon? at over 8″ long and 5.5″ tall, it is too big for most ccw holders to carry everyday.
    I hope you do your research and learn before you might buy one. My 1911 was almost half the price of the sig’s, And is smaller than the 226. Just like you said about the Sig’s they’re nice but too expensive. And for that price, not worth it to me.
    And now that I have my 1st. 1911, I can see why so many people love them and don’t want anything else.
    I don’t think I could go back to double action triggers after having the 1911! and if you can shoot good you don’t need 15 rounds, I feel fine with my 7+1 capacity in my .45 cal.. Shot placement is better than high capacity mag’s anyday

    • Tom September 15, 2014, 11:15 am

      As I do this for a living, I’m quite well aware of the availability of double-stack 1911s 🙂 And 9mm 1911s. And double barrel 1911s, for whatever purpose those are supposed to serve.

      This is simply a different option for folks to consider and I would beg to differ about not being able to carry a full size gun. Millions of us do every day. It’s all a matter of choices.

      This is a very dangerous thought: “and if you can shoot good you don’t need 15 rounds” You never know what might be coming your way. One aggressor, two, three, a gang? Now add adrenaline. Now add movement from all involved. Now consider the average percentage of hit rates for both CCW carriers and police in actual gun fights. Now consider an average of 2.3 actual hits to stop an active attack (statistically speaking) and so on, and so on. I often carry a 1911 with 7+1 as well, but I would never presume that it’s always gonna be enough because “I can shoot good.”

      • Eddie Perez September 15, 2014, 7:05 pm

        Great reply man. First thing that popped into my head was “what if I’m getting jumped?” Who cares if you “shoot good” you’re gonna run outta ammo. In which case you’re probably gonna wish you had a BIG ASS full size EDC to hit ’em with! LoL

    • John September 15, 2014, 3:37 pm

      I’m a pretty fair shot, but the truth is that paper targets and clay birds do not shoot back. I won’t argue 8+1, or 20+1, everyone has their own comfort level, but if you want to read about a real gun fight, the limitations of various firearms, and what can go down when SHTF go to Wikipedia and read about the Newhall massacre. Granted this was a police action and it happened in 1970, but you don’t have to be a cop to have someone shoot at you, and how much has really changed since then?

  • John September 15, 2014, 10:05 am

    Sig Sauer, over the past few years, has slowly been taking over my gun safe. Seems like every-time I turn around Sig has come up with something more interesting, and functional, than a lot of other companies. When I was asked by a gun store clerk why my interest in Sig was so great my response was that I have over the years owned 12 or more Sig’s and every one of them worked right out of the box, (no disclaimers of “put 500 rounds through in and call us in the morning”) not a single one of them had ever malfunctioned, not to mention their superior accuracy.
    I’ve often wondered why Sig didn’t come up with a single action pistol in their P series and now hey have, but I really don’t need another pistol right now, want is another subject. Perhaps if they extend this idea to the P-220 in .45 I would be interested.
    On another note I would love to see an article on Sig’s new 1911 Max. A professional evaluation would be great because with an MSRP of +$1,700 I would like to get an idea of what makes it so special to command the price. Backed out of a trade sometime back because even with the extra bells and whistles it basically looked like my Sig Tactical Operations 1911 and I was having second thoughts about giving up my Smith and Wesson E series 1911TA in the trade. Doesn’t help when you have a wife who also shoots, reads gun magazines and constantly reminds me of Col Cooper’s mantra of “if you have a functional firearm, keep it, there will always be something new, but not necessarily better” or words to that effect.

  • Vanns40 September 15, 2014, 9:45 am

    Good review. I’d be interested in knowing approx. how many rounds total you put through it. My only other comment is; everybody shoots what they like, this gun is pretty pricey compared to Glocks, which I’m admittedly a fan of. For the price of this gun you can just about have two Glocks but, you shoot what you like.

    • Tom September 15, 2014, 11:08 am

      Somewhere in the neighborhood of 1,000 rounds of various ammo so far, and counting 🙂

      Good point about shooting what you like. While you can buy a Glock for less, they’re not comparable. Yes, they both reliably launch a projectile in the right direction, but then again, both a Mercedes CLS Coupe and an AMC Gremlin will both get you to the store and back, but they’re not comparable either.

      • Burmeister September 15, 2014, 1:41 pm

        Great reply, I know I hear that all the time.(my Glock shoots better or I can buy two) Just like you said. drive your Mustang and Ill drive the Lamborghini!! Sig makes what counts. and as for all the State and local Police going with Glocks. They are cheap! just my two scents..

      • Burmeister September 15, 2014, 1:43 pm

        Great reply, I know I hear that all the time.(my Glock shoots better or I can buy two) Just like you said. drive your Mustang and Ill drive the Lamborghini!! Sig makes what counts. and as for all the State and local Police going with Glocks. They are cheap! just my two scents..

  • Lt. Donn September 15, 2014, 9:12 am

    As a CHL and longtime trainer, I am constantly asked for my recommendations as to suitable Concealed Carry firearms and related equipment. I always tell my students that Sig makes an excellent product…always has, going way back to the Browning BDA. But, the price-point continues to be beyond what many CHL holders can afford…a Sig that shoots consistently into 2″ ( or less) at 25 yds is not qualitatively better than a Glock to the average CHL holder who is [never] likely to have to make such a shot.
    And, the Glock/Ruger/SA- XD, S&W M&P etc. are all less than 50% the cost of the Sig. To be certain Sig has a very dedicated cadre of loyal owners…who extoll the virtues of the Sig platform above all others, and good for them! All of us need to have something to be passionate about. But for me, I cannot get too excited about this “new” offering until the price point comes down way below 1,000…say around 600-700…THEN I will become excited.

    • El Mac December 8, 2014, 10:27 am

      You can keep your lousy Glocks.

    • Tim S. December 21, 2014, 1:48 pm

      True, Glocks are excellent pistols in their own right with many advantages, but rarely do they ever shoot as well as SIGs with respect to intrinsic accuracy. There are some SIG lemons out there, too, but SIG’s version of the modified Browning tilt barrel design is faultless and contributes to better accuracy than other re-inventions of the same basic principles.

      Although I do not know if this is true for you or not, but most self-touted “instructors” and “trainers” do not possess this skill to extract the better intrinsic accuracy of the SIG over a Glock and will thus never see the value in it.

      The guy who spends another $1K or $2K for a semi-custom 1911 can hardly argue for the better “value” of a pistol that is capable of shooting 1″ groups when it costs $2K-$3K. It simply doesn’t make dollars and sense. The reality is, we spend the extra $ for a higher level of craftsmanship that simply can’t be achieved with a nylon pistol.

      Tim

  • ScranunSlim September 15, 2014, 7:35 am

    You want SAO – get an Hk USP, chamber a round, put the “safe” on and pull the hammer back.

  • william whitman September 15, 2014, 5:53 am

    Just purchased a P220 dark elite . was looking at a tac. opps. or a mk25 for 9mm. I hope my gun shop has one, or can get one soon. Love to try this one out.

  • william whitman September 15, 2014, 5:52 am

    Just purchased a P220 dark elite . was looking at a tac. opps. or a mk25 for 9mm. I hope my gun shop has one, or can get one soon. Love to try this one out.

    • steve-o September 15, 2014, 9:31 am

      Love my MK25. Carry it every day in a Galco King Tukwila IWC holster. Bought the 20 round extended mag just cuz. It only sticks out about 3/4″ and I like the 5 extra rounds w/out having to carry extra mags.

      • Tom September 15, 2014, 11:02 am

        I use some King Tuk holsters as well. Excellent product. They pay attention to the little details like smooth edges, etc.

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