New In-Line Muzzle Loaders and SUB MOA Rifles From Thompson Center–SHOT Show 2016

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Thompson Center had two new rifles to show us at SHOT Show this year.  One is an entry level bolt-action center-fire gun that makes some big promises, and the other is a totally modern twist on the muzzle loader.

The new T/C Compass.

The new T/C Compass.

The new Thompson Center Compass is loaded with features and comes in at a budget price.  T/C guaranties sub MOA 3 shot groups out of this rifle. The Compass comes in a multitude of calibers from 204 Ruger up to 300 Win Mag, with 8 more chamberings in between. Other features of the new Compass are:

  • Free Floated Barrel
  • 3 Position Safety
  • 60 Degrees Bolt Lift for Scope Clearance
  • Threaded Muzzle
  • 5 or 4 Round Rotary Magazine
  • 3.5-5 lbs Adjustable Trigger

The biggest feature of the Thompson Center Compass is the price. These will all (yes all–caliber does not matter) carry an MSRP of $399. Sub MOA guaranty with a threaded barrel for under under $400? We hope to have one of these in for testing soon, but this sounds like a winner.

The new Strike from Thompson Center.

The new Strike from Thompson Center.

The other new release from Thompson Center is the Strike Muzzle Loader. T/C is known for there traditional and modern in-line black powder rifles. The new Strike is about as modern as it gets in the muzzle loading segment and it is striker fired. Here are some specs on the new Strike:

  • Simple One Screw Takedown
  • 24″ Barrel with 1:28 Twist
  • Stealth Striker System
  • Match Grade Trigger 3 lb Pull
  • Adaptive Breech for Different Primers

Striker fired muzzle loaders are a pretty new thing.  They do work a little different than a striker fired pistol.  Instead the slide or recoil cocking the striker, on the Strike you cock with a lever on the tang.  It is very quiet and relatively easy to manipulate. If you don’t get your shot off, it is simple to decock for safety.  The Thompson Center Strike carries an MSRP starting at $499. It will be available in black or G2 Camo synthetic, or walnut stocks.

Threaded muzzle on the Compass.

Threaded muzzle on the Compass and some specs.

Bolt from the Compass.

Bolt from the Compass.

3 lugs.

3 lugs.

Smith and Wesson is making the actions on the Compass and are so marked.

Smith and Wesson is making the actions on the Compass and are so marked.

The Strike has a very modern looking trigger guard.

The Strike has a very modern looking trigger guard.

The red dot means the striker is cocked.

The red dot means the striker is cocked.

The new Strike striker fired in-line from Thompson Center.

The new Strike striker fired in-line from Thompson Center.

 

{ 3 comments… add one }
  • Scot Mahan-Miller March 26, 2016, 6:56 am

    The Strike looks a LOT like the LHR Sporting Arms “Redemption” that came out about 4 / 5 years ago, trigger guard, breech plugs … the works … did TC buy out LHR?

  • Gary February 1, 2016, 2:16 pm

    This is just a guess, but I would assume they are capable of building one sir. I also assume that it is made to shoot black powder as many or most states require black powder (or a modern day equivalent) to black powder be used for muzzleloading seasons.
    As she stated in the video, some states will not even allow a scope to be mounted on your muzzleloader during muzzleloader season, but many will allow you to use a muzzleloader with a scope during Regular gun season.
    Also, some states require the use of shotguns OR a muzzleloader during Gun season. I am sure in Their minds smokeless powder in a muzzleloader would be the same as using a normal rifle.
    I live in a shotgun or muzzleloader ONLY area for gun season. The strangest part of it is though, you are allowed to use a hand gun of pretty much ANY caliber! Including High Power Rifle calibers such as .308! I have used a T/C in 7-30 Waters since handgun hunting was made legal here.
    Again, this is just a guess. I am sure safety is also a strong consideration as well. As most modern muzzleloaders can usually hold togeather with a double load of black powder, or even much more. I doubt this would be the case if an over allowance of smokeless powder was to be loaded by accident.
    Once again this is just a guess, and only my opinion sir.

  • JB February 1, 2016, 12:25 pm

    If this is truly “as modern as it gets in the muzzle loading segment”, why was it not designed to handle smokeless powder? What is so hard about building a muzzle loader in 2016 that a company like T/C can’t offer this in smokeless? Savage accomplished it years ago and showed that an accurate, quality, smokeless muzzle loader can be mass produced and offered for under $700. Come on T/C, what’s the problem?

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