We Shoot the New Walther PPS M2–New Gun Review

Read more at Watlher: http://www.waltherarms.com/handguns/pps/pps-m2/

Buy a PPS on GunsAmerica.com: https://www.gunsamerica.com/Search.aspx?T=pps

Much More than a Line Extension

‘Tis the season for new guns, and Walther has definitely brought us some nice new introductions in 2015 already. They are kicking off 2016 with a new gun that is sure to please. Walther is aiming to prove that it listens to the American market once again, with the introduction of the PPS M2. This great new pistol incorporates both the styling foundations of the tremendously popular PPQ and the requests of their customers. Some of the changes are obvious at first glance, while others only become apparent when you take a closer look, but all of them make sense.

The overall size remains identical, but the new version of the PPS is easy to identify.

The overall size remains identical, but the new version of the PPS is easy to identify.

Available Immediately

You know what I’m excited about? This new gun is shipping to distributors right now, literally as you are reading this article. The first models will be in 9mm. Walther will be following up with a model in .40 S&W in the late Spring/early Summer. Everett Deger, Director of Marketing at Walther America, said “We will listen to the customers and bring out the calibers that they want, just as we brought out the PPQ in .45 ACP.” I’m sure that many of you have found yourselves saying, “I love the new gun but they just won’t make it in the caliber I want” before. I don’t think you’re going to have to worry about that with this one. Deger confirmed that the MSRP would be $469 for the base M2 and $499 for the M2 LE addition. The key difference between the two will be that the LE addition will feature phosphoric sights. The gun will have six, seven and eight round magazines available. All of the Walther purists will be happy to know that the Classic model will remain available in Walther’s line.

New texturing with enhanced finger grooves combined with the seven round extended magazine makes this gun feel like a baby PPQ.

New texturing with enhanced finger grooves combined with the seven round extended magazine makes this gun feel like a baby PPQ.

The magazine release is strategically placed within the new ergonomic grip to avoid accidental activation.

The magazine release is strategically placed within the new ergonomic grip to avoid accidental activation.

History

Walther introduced the PPS in 2007. This model will now be referred to as the PPS Classic–not the M1. The PPS Classic was designed for concealed carry civilians and plainclothes law enforcement personnel. It features a short recoil locking breach, and uses a modified Browning cam lock system, much like that of the Hi Power.

Many of the styling cues of the new M2 resemble the popular PPQ.

Many of the styling cues of the new M2 resemble the popular PPQ.

The M2 gets away from the boxy look of the classic PPS.

The M2 gets away from the boxy look of the classic PPS.

If you will recall, this release was well before the introduction of Smith and Wesson’s Shield, or Springfield Armory’s XDS Compact. As such, the PPS Classic really represented the first introduction of a single stack compact 9mm pistol to the marketplace. Over the last nine years, we have seen introductions from those manufacturers listed above, as well as GLOCK. Everyone has skin in the single stack 9mm. game now.

The Details

The sights on the new Walther PPS M2 are all metal, and have a traditional 3 dot system. The slide appears to have been completely redesigned, with cocking serrations on the front and rear of the pistol. The PPS logo is featured much more prominently on the side opposite of the ejection port.

Steel sights with two dots on the rear. Notice the striker is no longer painted red.

Steel sights with two dots on the rear. Notice the striker is no longer painted red.

Front Sight is steel that is attached with a screw from the bottom of the slide.

Front Sight is steel that is attached with a screw from the bottom of the slide.

The polymer frame has been given a complete makeover as well. The accessory rail has been removed, and the dust cover has been reshaped and smoothed to eliminate sharp edges. The grip of the pistol has been restyled, and now very much resembles its big brother, the PPQ. Deger refers to this as “the Carl Walther ergonomics” in effect. The finger grooves are much more pronounced and rounded, with a grit texture added. This texture carries on to the extended magazine, to allow a full grip on the gun.

The interchangeable back straps have been removed as well as the striker disconnect. This safety feature was lost on most users.

The interchangeable back straps have been removed as well as the striker disconnect. This safety feature was lost on most users.

The back strap on the classic model was removable and interchangeable, and came with a rather unique feature- when the back strap was removed, the striker was decocked to render the gun inoperable. This feature could be quite annoying if the back strap was damaged. Some will be excited to learn that Walther has removed this feature from the M2. As an added bonus, the back strap now includes a swell that contours nicely to the palm of the hand.

The magazine release on the classic model was along the trigger guard, and could be activated using your thumb or index finger. Although this touch does well in Europe, the American market simply prefers the thumb magazine release. The new magazine release is tucked and shaped in such a way as to make it very easy to activate deliberately, but difficult to inadvertently dump your magazine with.

25.The trigger guard has been reshaped with smoother lines, it still retains its ability to shoot with gloves.

The trigger guard has been reshaped with smoother lines, it still retains its ability to shoot with gloves.

The trigger with its new design was a welcomed improvement.

The trigger with its new design was a welcomed improvement.

The trigger has also been completely redesigned, with a reshaped trigger and trigger guard. The new trigger guard and grip work together to provide a very ergonomic positioning for the index finger. Inside the gun, the transfer bar mechanism is completely different as well. Although the trigger is not a PPQ trigger, it represents a vast improvement over the Classic’s trigger. Its pull is listed at just over 6 pounds, which is about right for a defensive firearm without an external safety. Anecdotally speaking, I found the trigger to have a smooth, predictable pull; this is much more important to me than the actual weight.

Specifications

M2Classic
Caliber9 mm9mm
Weight Empty1lb 2oz1lb 2oz
Length6.326.32
Barrel length3.2″3.2″
Width1″1″
Height W/ 6 round Magazine4.34.3
Height w/ 7 round Magazine4.914.91
The PPS is a great looking and performing gun. It is not a must have but it would have been nice to have an ambidextrous magazine release.

The PPS is a great looking and performing gun. It is not a must have but it would have been nice to have an ambidextrous magazine release.

On the Range

My first opportunity to take the new gun to the range it was on a crisp January morning. I am a firm believer in the idea that gunfights are a “come as you are” affair, and you should train appropriately. In the spirit of that mentality, I did my first shooting of the winter with gloves on. The new trigger and trigger guard allowed me to retain my control of the gun, and the improved grip design provided a secure purchase with gloves. Once I had established a feel for the gun, I wanted to try some reloads with the new magazine release. I was well-acquainted with the trigger guard-mounted release of the PPS Classic, which I had brought with me. After reloading both pistols back to back, I was amazed by how much faster I was able to operate the button release on the M2.

Control could be maintained with gloves even during rapid-fire.

Control could be maintained with gloves even during rapid-fire.

My accuracy suffered using gloves as I lost some trigger control. This was not the fault of the Walther but simply a trade-off of keeping my hands warm.

My accuracy suffered using gloves as I lost some trigger control. This was not the fault of the Walther but simply a trade-off of keeping my hands warm.

This represents what the gun will deliver without my errors.

This represents what the gun will deliver without my errors.

Magazines are not interchangeable due to the new magazine release and contoured basis.

Magazines are not interchangeable due to the new magazine release and contoured base.

The sights were familiar and precise, delivering accuracy that was second to none. The gun was very controllable- at 10 yards, I was able to place a head or multiple body shots with equal ease. I ran through a variety of range ammunition and defensive rounds, and the gun performed well firing each and every one of them. My sample M2 came with a six round magazine and a seven round magazine. I was able to perform slide lock reloads with both magazines in the primary and secondary positions without any incident. Throughout all of my testing, the gun experienced no malfunctions of any kind.

Due to the deadline for this article, I was not able to truly settle on which ammunition delivered the best accuracy. Out of all the groups that I shot, I did not have any issues with accuracy, but I enjoy testing different ammunition types and finding the sweet spot for each gun. I will be taking this gun to the range again soon for a more extended test-firing session, and I will certainly provide information on ammunition performance when I have it available.

Recoil and follow shots were easy even with the 3 inch barrel.

Recoil and follow shots were easy even with the 3 inch barrel.

The Bottom Line

I have owned a PPS since 2011. Since I acquired my first PPS, I have carried it as a backup gun, and occasionally as my primary. I own or have owned a Glock 43, Springfield XDS, Walther CCP, Smith & Wesson Shield and several compact 1911s. Throughout all of these acquisitions, I have continued to carry the PPS because of its small size, absolute reliability and exceptional accuracy. I’m sad to say that my Classic will now be relegated to safe duty while I carry the M2. Walther has done something amazing: reducing the price of the gun while simultaneously adding features that enhance it.

I’ve been trying to think of something I would have done differently, had I been a part of the design team. I did come up with one thing: I would really like to see tritium sights available from the factory. I’ll be looking out for lasers and lights for this gun that do not require the accessory rail, as none are currently available. However, I do have it on good authority that holsters for the PPS M2 will be available this week from Bravo Concealment and Galco, and I suspect that other manufacturers will be following suit quickly. I can definitely deal with a slight accessory shortage in exchange for having the gun available this week, versus six months or a year. Sorry, Classic, it’s time for you to retire- the PPS M2 is a line extension done exceptionally well.

These square edges have been narrowed and contoured.

These square edges have been narrowed and contoured.

By removing the accessory rail they have been able to melt the frame for easier carry.

By removing the accessory rail they have been able to melt the frame for easier carry.

The magazine button is textured and easy to reach. It is protected from accidental activation by a swell in the grip.

The magazine button is textured and easy to reach. It is protected from accidental activation by a swell in the grip.

The classic paddle release will be missed by a few purist and those lefty shooters.

The classic paddle release will be missed by a few purist and those lefty shooters.

Notice the differences in the firing mechanisms between models this is not just a re-skinning that the internals have been completely redesigned.

Notice the differences in the firing mechanisms between models this is not just a re-skinning that the internals have been completely redesigned.

Notice the S indicating this is the lighter trigger on the classic.

Notice the S indicating this is the lighter trigger on the classic.

Spring and barrel appear to be interchangeable.

Spring and barrel appear to be interchangeable.

The new cocking serrations with the Walther logo adds a nice addition.

The new cocking serrations with the Walther logo adds a nice addition.

Notice here the new striker design much slimmer than the classic.

Notice here the new striker design much slimmer than the classic.

The new trigger design has a look and feel much more like the PPQ and the rounded trigger guard is a welcomed change.

The new trigger design has a look and feel much more like the PPQ and the rounded trigger guard is a welcomed change.

The rear cocking serrations have been changed for a more traditional look.

The rear cocking serrations have been changed for a more traditional look.

The lines on the front of the gun have been given a minimalist no snag makeover with removal of the accessory rail.

The lines on the front of the gun have been given a minimalist no snag makeover with removal of the accessory rail.

The new frame clearly shows Walther arms Fort Smith Arkansas.

The new frame clearly shows Walther arms Fort Smith Arkansas.

{ 78 comments… add one }
  • chroode July 13, 2017, 4:18 pm

    I contacted Walther USA and they said there will be NO .40 S&W version of the PPS M2. 🙁

  • Rich February 17, 2017, 11:32 am

    I was really lucky to pick up my Walters PPS M1 for $250 I really like it doesn’t look like they’re going to be making it anymore I can’t find it anywhere for sale I did see two ads at Gander Mountain that were sold out for the Walters PPS M1 classic one was 599 dollars and the other was $650 dollars both sold out does anyone know did they quit making the Walters PPS M1

  • Ken Burns January 27, 2017, 12:22 pm

    I am new to hand guns. Spent my youth in NRA, at the range and hunting with my father. Now, at 68, I am getting into hand guns. I have been looking seriously at the Walther PPS M2. It feels great in my hand. I guess my only concern after reading
    through the comments is the mag release. I am a leftie and wonder if that is going to be an issue.

    • Bob Bacon August 6, 2017, 10:23 pm

      You should be able to hit the mag button with your left middle finger, like many other guns.

  • Robert W Roth January 18, 2017, 8:52 am

    I have the original PPS and really love it. In fact, I prefer the European style mag release!

  • Robert W Roth January 18, 2017, 8:51 am

    I have the original PPS and really love it. In fact, I prefer the European style mag release!

  • Brad December 6, 2016, 4:00 pm

    I like the over look of the gun and the size as well. The price seems right and I think the extras will come in time. I would like to add a laser site to my order and a very good holster. The size is just a tiny bit larger then I would like, but It still will fit without giving it away as a CC. I think I have made my choice for a defense weapon.

  • Tyler December 6, 2016, 9:21 am

    Another striker fired plastic gun. How exciting. Looks completely different from the rest.

  • Tony McSwain December 5, 2016, 11:06 am

    I bought this pistol about two months ago. I put it, a glock 43 and a S&W all together on the counter and compared them. The only thing I have against the Glock is the trigger, absolutely terrible stock trigger in every way except poundage and it is about the same across the board at 5-8 lbs. All three are excellent for their intended use and a lot will depend on personal preference.

    When I held the pistols in my hand, the Walther felt better with the 7-8 round magazines, I can’t bring myself to shoot the 6 rounder except in an emergency, last mag case. The trigger felt better on the Walther than the other 2 pistols.So I picked the Walther.

    I had the same run in with the mags not wanting to top of with the last shot until I had fired them trough twice each. After that no problem but the biggest surprise happened after about 25 rounds. The little stiffness and grit in the trigger disapeared and the pistol shoots like warm butter now. I could not believe it so went home and tore it down and cleaned it and went back to the range the next weekend. This is the smoothest stock, striker fired trigger I have owned. 5 1/2 to 6 1/2 pounds and it feels better than the Olympic 3 1/2 pound trigger I put on my last Glock. This is the best pistol in this class of pistols I have run across…yet!

  • Paul December 5, 2016, 7:58 am

    It would be great if you could always have a lefty comment on each gun you review! While I can try and read between the lines and look at the pictures, it would be nice to just say ambi slide release/safety/mag release, or whatever. Or if there any feel issues when using lefty. Thanks!

  • Walt August 24, 2016, 1:25 pm

    Still waiting for the M2 in 40 S&W anyone know when it will be available? They said late spring early summer and it’s late August and still no 40!!

    • Mike September 4, 2016, 8:04 pm

      I just ordered mine Walt. M2 .40 w/5″ slide

      • George December 5, 2016, 9:46 am

        What’s the mag capacity on the 40?

    • Grant December 7, 2016, 1:20 pm

      I’ve been waiting for the M2 in .40 as well and actually contacted Walther for an update. Bad news: no .40 coming. Here’s their reply:

      Grant –

      I’m sorry, Walther will not be manufacturing a PPS M2 in .40.

      Casey Craig
      Gun Technician
      Walther Arms, Inc.

  • Johnie Clemenza June 5, 2016, 3:53 am

    I’m impressed, I must say. Really rarely do I encounter a blog that’s both educative and entertaining, and let me tell you, you have hit the nail on the head. Your idea is outstanding; the issue is something that not enough people are speaking intelligently about. I am very happy that I stumbled across this in my search for something relating to this.

  • Michael May 2, 2016, 2:53 pm

    I’m Very disappointed that Walther snubbed the left handed shooters by not making the American style mag release reversible! I own several Walthers…including a PPS classic. They all can be reversed…hell they even send a replacement button with the PPQ 45 to reverse its mag release! It even appears that the PPS M2 mags even have a slot that would allow a LH mag button? I would even be willing to pay for a reversible button if Walther would pull their heads out of their butts and offer it! I guess I’ll make my own reversed button!

    • G May 9, 2016, 5:10 pm

      Looks reversible to me… Both sides the trigger push button hole is the same so you can switch it to a left handed release. While it isn’t simultaneously ambi like a paddle release, it does offer the option to switch from right to left..

  • joe hajik March 30, 2016, 5:14 pm

    Question: Is the trigger pull weight much lower on the class PPS compared to the new PPS M2?
    Thank you for any and all answers.

  • David March 25, 2016, 12:53 am

    Just got my M2 PPS yesterday, and went to the range today to shoot it to qualify for my CPL, as I bought t he Walther for a carry gun. I am 68 years old, and although I have shot bolt action rifles and 12 gauge shotguns a bit in my youth, I had never before so much as held a pistol of any kind before, except at a large gun shop where there was a huge selection from which to choose, when looking for my recent purchase.

    The gun fit my medium size male hand perfectly with the seven round mag, with just a very tiny “crowding” of part of my pinky finger to just below the the bottom edge of the mag. The six shot magazine made the PPS M2 a four-finger pistol, something I don’t feel happy with. YMMV. The magazine release is perfectly placed and easy to operate quickly, yet seems to offer extremely little chance of being released accidentally. The slide was amazingly smooth to pull, much nicer than all the other smaller pistols I tried at the gun shop. The only small problem I encountered is that the new 7 round magazine spring was exceedingly stiff and after about the 4th round was loaded, it took way too much effort to load the next 3 rounds. I hope this changes with break-in over time. The trigger is good, very good with commendable smoothness and a good feel. Obviously, I’m not very experienced, but at least I know what feels right to me.

    As to shooting the gun, all I can say is that this is an amazing and finely engineered and made instrument. As a rank neophyte, although one with some ancient log gun experience, the Walther felt great to shoot. The 9mm recoil with range standard full metal jacket ammo was much less than I expected, making it extremely easy to keep the sight picture (my CPL class taut me the right words here) fairly constant, and the upward thrust of the barrel was minimal. The pistol was, at least to my eyes, amazingly accurate. I shot about 80% of my 15 foot shots in the center ring of the target and the rest in the 9 ring. At 30 feet, I did almost as well, with just about 3 total outliers in outer rings when I had to shoot rapid fire one handed. All in all, I was amazed, and no malfunctions of any kind through the first one hundred rounds. All this in my first ever attempt to shoot a pistol. Even the range master was pretty surprised, and was very skeptical when I told him I was a newbie. I attribute this about 50% to the hand-eye coordination that God gave me, but fully 50% to my new Walther PPS M2. I don’t think I could have done near as well with any other easily carried single stack 9; this is one smooth handling gun.

    I do believe that I’m going to really enjoy using this pistol for many years. Just thought your readers, especially you beginners out there, would enjoy reading about my experience.

    • Richard Mclane May 28, 2016, 9:35 pm

      Thanks for all the good info. I have been interested in purchasing Walters compact, and you answered the questions that I had

  • Bill S March 2, 2016, 2:40 pm

    I have owned a PPS .40 for several years now. Very reliable. North of 2k rounds through it and still accurate at 30 feet. I have had a few stovepipes, but I was also using poor quality ammo when these occurred. Gold Dot HP’s seem to be the best in it but they have a considerable muzzle flash and recoil compared to ball ammo. DeSantis holster inside waistband. Very comfortable to walk around with. My only complaint is the trigger feel but on a compact carry, I don’t expect much. Just something to get me out of harms way. Might get this new one just to compare. I recommend to anyone who has not carried this pistol to try one out. They are inexpensive enough to fit almost any budget. I don’t think you will regret it.

  • jD February 24, 2016, 10:17 pm

    When are they going to release the PPS M2 in .40cal s&w?…

  • Nick February 18, 2016, 10:35 pm

    How hard is to rack the slide compared to the CCP? Deciding between this and the CCP for my wife. I was ready to get the CCP because it’s so easy to rack plus the softer recoil.

    • Lisa June 18, 2016, 12:46 pm

      I’m a woman of 52 and I find the slide very comfortable to pull. The slide has really good grip and the slide release was very comfortable and easy to actuate. The grip is perfect for my small hands. Recoil is difficult to express. She would really need to try them out at the range. The shop I use has an I tri class that lets people try out different guns. I think she would be happy with either. I hope this helps a little.

      • Lisa June 18, 2016, 12:48 pm

        The shop I use has an “intro” class..

  • Sigster January 26, 2016, 7:51 pm

    It would be nice if any of the major outdoor media reviews mentioned that they released the PPS M2 but still as of today 1/26/16 have not released any magazines for this gun. That’s the real scoop that people should know before purchasing.

    • Marshall Hood March 11, 2016, 1:55 pm

      Here, here! I wish I would have known that extra magazines (preferably 7- and 8-round) are nowhere to be found. I mistakenly ordered a “Walther PPS 9 mm Luger 7- 8-round magazine” online, only to discover that it was for a m-1 or Classic only. Two prongs at the base prohibited it from seating into the handle.

  • Jay January 20, 2016, 6:33 am

    The PPS “Classic” in 9mm has been my EDC for the last 4 years. I bought mainly because at that time you couldn’t find a Shield. After reading favorable reviews, I took a closer look at the PPS. It just felt right immediately, despite its slightly sci-fi look. It has functioned flawlessly for me and I consider it the best small gun I’ve ever owned. This review does a great job describing the improvements in detail. I feel like Walther really did listen to the market. I’d buy the M2 if I didn’t have so much money invested in the Classic, (holsters, spare mags, etc.) Well written article, thanks!

  • Mark January 16, 2016, 1:12 am

    I like the gun I think they are finally getting it right, step backwards? That’s a little harsh.

    The real problem is the comment on the Glocks. I didn’t know we started buying guns on what they look like? I think this gentleman did this for its reliability and updates. For a the person who cares that their weapon works when you need it too. I never heard anyone say “hey that guy saved my life” and someone says yeah but did you see how ugly the gun was that saved you? Besides Glock has revolutioned the gun industry, if you don’t own one because its ugly, wow that’s scary and kind of ridiculous.
    Thank you for the video John, I was very curious to see the changes in action.

    Just curious if you tried the new inceptor ammo yet and what you think. I believe Ruger is now putting its name behind it. Sorry guys its not cute ammo.

    • Sal September 16, 2017, 2:47 pm

      Yes, I guess some people would rather make love to their gun than shoot it. I admit, some revolvers can
      be gorgeous but I haven’t seen a plastic gun yet that turned me on aesthetically.

  • HandyDan January 10, 2016, 2:35 pm

    Wow there is a lot of hate for this gun here. Personally, the updated mag release has moved this from a possible buy to a definite buy for me. I’ve never tried a paddle release, but with defensive guns I try to keep my manual of arms the same. Sorry to you leftys, Walther realized that by putting a more standard (at least in America) mag release on the PPQ, they turned a sluggish seller into a hot seller, and they want to go the same with what from I have seen is a totally under appreciated gun. And for those of you that want that type release, the current model is dropping in price. If what has happened with the PPQ holds true, you will be able to easily buy the magazines for both the old and the new.
    Personally, I like what they have done. The removable back strap always seemed like a waste, does anyone really have hands so small that they can’t grasp one of these pocket 9s? I’m ambivalent on the front cocking serations, I guess they have a bit more of a place on a small slide gun like this one then on a full size or compact. And I think that this new model looks really attractive. From experience with my PPQ, I know that the grip is going to be ridiculously grippy.

    • John W Bletsch February 9, 2016, 3:10 pm

      I was not aware there is an M2 version of the PPS. That said, I still prefer the original design and do not find the M2 version to be any enticement to switch. The removable backstrap is helpful to some with very small hands and my lady has hands that are too small even for proper grip on a S&W J frame. The slim backstrap is just the ticket getting her trigger finger on the trigger with the center of the tip. Too bad that the M2 version did not continue that feature because many with small hands will look elsewhere. I will also state that I like the distinctive look of the original PPS and find the PPS M2 looks like nearly everything else.

      • Lisa June 18, 2016, 12:51 pm

        I am a woman with small hands and I find the grip to be prefect. It was my deciding factor over the Glock. I hope this helps.

  • Wayne January 5, 2016, 12:12 pm

    Where is the Walther engineer that did a wonderful job on the PPQ? I am a left hander that appreciates a slide release and mag release that can be efficiently used. I was anticipating a new purchase of the PPS M2 to go along with my PPQ. Walther, I am disappointed! Will have to take a look at the Glock 43. At least, they provide an ambi mag release.

    • CF January 6, 2016, 11:32 am

      The Glock 43’s magazine release is not reversible.

      I am a left handed PPQ M1 owner too and I am disappointed

      • Wayne January 6, 2016, 3:30 pm

        Several reviews mention that the G43 mag release is reversible. I see one report where a lefty reported that the magazine was sticking. Any expert care to comment?

  • Brian January 5, 2016, 12:10 pm

    I carry the classic PPS in .40 and shoot it twice a month. I can shoot dead center double+taps and have no trouble shooting weak hand as well. I am happy to see the new M2 for those who want it, but will stick with my classic.

    • Nicks87 January 5, 2016, 2:44 pm

      I had both the .40 and the 9mm version and I thought they where junk. Constant stove pipes, too much muzzle flip and expensive magazines and spare parts. No more Walthers for me, thanks.

      • Cass30 January 30, 2016, 12:37 am

        Might want to have your grip strength tested. Maybe limp-wristing them? I can’t imagine you somehow bought two defective weapons, because while folks might have their issues with this model, I’m flabbergasted that you had the issues you’re claiming with both a .40 AND a 9mm. Just admit you like GLOCKs, and avoid the PPS-slander. Love my PPS 9 mm “classic”. And my PPQ. Possibly more Walthers for me, thanks.

        • Dragonheart June 11, 2016, 11:40 am

          I agree completely my wife and I both purchased the PPS shortly after they were introduced and they have had thousands of rounds fired through them over the years and we are still waiting for the first malfunction that is not caused by bad ammo. To call the PPS “junk” and try to tell us you had two bad guns tells me you are posting BS. When the PPS was introduced the reviewers said “This is the gun Glock should have built”. The rest of the manufactures were far behind the Walther PPS and still haven’t built anything better.

          • Bob Bacon August 6, 2017, 10:31 pm

            The one that quits working when the back plate falls off is junk from drawing board to shipping box.

  • Frank mcdonnell January 5, 2016, 9:32 am

    Good review, but you didn’t mention whether the mag release was reversible, like the Nano or fixed, as the Shield is. Lefty militant, not training to pick up a weapon on the battlefield, if they don’t consider the 10% of the population then I’ll stick to products that do.

  • Wayne January 5, 2016, 9:30 am

    What happened to the Walther engineer that took care of the left hander with the wonderful PPQ design? I am a big fan of the PPQ and was looking forward to purchasing the PPS M2. I will have to take another look at the Glock 43. Walther, I am very dissappointed.

    • Mark January 7, 2016, 4:25 am

      Judging from the cutouts on the right side of the pistol, it appears to be reversible. That would be a big change of design sensibility for the worse if they abandoned their loyal lefties. They would get a shit storm of hatemail for sure.

      • Wayne January 7, 2016, 3:14 pm

        Fully agree. The author had this gun in hand. It would be nice if he resolves this question. Is the mag release reversible or not? A quick review of the manual should clarify or perhaps a Walther rep could answer.

  • Gary Spann January 5, 2016, 9:29 am

    Who says we all want a button mag release? You know a paddle release works great.

    • Gary G January 17, 2016, 7:29 pm

      Well, that is very true.
      And THAT is why Walther is KEEPING the PPS (classic) in their lineup.
      Choose either one.

  • steven winn January 5, 2016, 5:09 am

    NO, Thank You, concerning the PPS, I prefer my old PPK James Bond gun…. IT has NEVER misfired over the years. My cousin bought a PPS, and it mis-fired on him in a dangerous situation as a police detective. PPS, his partner had to save his life…..he called plastic crap. So do I. People at Walther have to feature the all steel PPK’s, but they do NOT

  • tom January 5, 2016, 12:03 am

    what I would like to see is the CCP in 40. and maybe carrying 10 rounds. if Sig can do it why not Walther.

  • Urstadt January 4, 2016, 9:59 pm

    Hi Jon,
    Thanks, for the review. Regarding the rear sights: is the notch width on the M2 the same as the Classic, or does the width resemble the PPQ/P99? Thank you.

  • MagnumOpUS January 4, 2016, 8:30 pm

    Not an improvement upon the preceding PPS, IMHO, but merely a new variant offering different features, thus enlarging the market share.

    I personally prefer the CCP to the PPS.

    • Mark January 7, 2016, 4:26 am

      I continue to be fascinated with the CCP despite it getting knocked by everybody. I still want one.

    • Phil July 30, 2016, 12:22 am

      I have both, CCP & PPS M2, also have a PPQ M2. All three are good! Shoot the PPQ best, carry either PPQ M2 OR PPS M2. Everyone has their own preference, it’s a personal thing! If you like it, that’s all that matters.

  • James Borjes January 4, 2016, 6:46 pm

    They just made the ccp, why make this? Also, it’s a step backwards. Bring back paddle mag releases. I’ll stick with the classic, my ccp, ppq m1, and p99.

  • Andrés Silva M. January 4, 2016, 6:11 pm

    Tengo la PPS Clásica y la verdad no la cambio por nada, prefiero el sistema paddle, me gusta el sistema Quick Safe, es mejor con riel picatinni y backstrap que calza perfecto para mi. Es mi PPS 100 % confiable. Por que debería cambiar ??

  • Walter Williamson January 4, 2016, 1:31 pm

    Kind of reminds me of a Beretta Nano.

  • Mike C January 4, 2016, 12:23 pm

    Another nice option from Walther but was it really necessary? And why not stick with paddle mag release, which requires less hand re-positioning to operate? Love my PPQ 9mm

  • Jim January 4, 2016, 10:31 am

    I’ll keep my beautiful under-powered electroplated Beretta Model 84 . Give me style over function. Now I have to go polish my disco ball.

  • Bruce January 4, 2016, 10:18 am

    Since all the holes appear in the same place, who cares how it looks?

  • michael January 4, 2016, 10:09 am

    I will keep my PPS M1 the paddle release works better than the button, also no front rail? I am a firearms instructor I shoot every gun under the sun I see no improvements with the M2.

  • Hardwater January 4, 2016, 9:41 am

    Walther should put a good trigger on the Mosquito. The one they use SUX.

    • XH January 4, 2016, 1:47 pm

      Sig makes the Mosquito, not Walther.

      • Yellowlt4 January 14, 2016, 12:10 pm

        Actually Umarex (Walther) does indeed make the Mosquito for SIG. Who’s responsible for the design/trigger, I don’t know.

  • Qpro4Inc January 4, 2016, 9:15 am

    I have carried the PPS almost since it was introduced. After two trips to the factory to fix early design flaws, it has operated flawlessly every since. I have tried the Springfield XDs, both in 9mm, and it comes in only at a close second. I have nearly 1000 rounds through each. I am not ready to retire my faithful friend for his new younger brother quite yet! BTW, with my arthritic hands, I prefer the old model, oops, the Classic, for its European style magazine button. Thanks for a good review.

  • C. Bonino January 4, 2016, 8:34 am

    Just bought my PPS (classic) during a Black Friday sale…gun is still unfired…shame to think it is already outmoded. Do like the looks of the new models grips. Agree with most comments on the clips not being interchangeable…just another expense for the multiple gun owner.

    • davud January 4, 2016, 12:43 pm

      it’s not outmoded. don’t buy into the marketer’s lie that newer is always better.

    • Richi January 4, 2016, 2:14 pm

      Just got mine recently too. From what I’ve seen, the original is still one of the best and easily beats most single stacks on the market. I don’t think you’re missing out mate.

    • Richi January 4, 2016, 2:15 pm

      Just got mine recently too. From what I’ve seen, the original is still one of the best and easily beats most single stacks on the market. I don’t think you’re missing out mate.

  • Tim January 4, 2016, 7:28 am

    Wife carries the 9mm PPS (classic…lol) now and likes this new one…. too bad mags arent interchangeable as we have several 7 and 8 rounders…. oh well…. progress…. prob ordering today…..

    • mark January 7, 2016, 4:29 am

      I’ll buy those mags from you! I juts picked up a 2012 PPS

  • Greg January 4, 2016, 6:33 am

    I bought my PPS a while ago. I like it BECAUSE it has an ambi (I’m a lefty) mag release, albeit one you have to train with to use smoothly; and the rail, because I have to venture out often at night into less respectable parts of town and I like a light on my gun. It goes from holster to bedside quite nicely when I get home late. It seems it took two of the best features and eliminated them.

    • XH January 4, 2016, 1:51 pm

      I liked the old PPS for the same reason. I was sorely disappointed in the CCP – it had an ambi safety but the mag release wasn’t even able to be swapped. Even the gen 4 Glocks can swap their mag release now, but Walther decided to take a step backward instead of keeping their best feature.

      • Six Dot January 21, 2016, 10:49 pm

        XH and Greg, that’s one of the beauties of owning an older version. If you love it, you don’t have to sell it, and you don’t have to pony up a chunk of cash to buy the new version. Both the PPS M2 and the PPS Classic are fantastic guns.

  • Hulon Lane January 4, 2016, 6:19 am

    All these new and improved models are good I guess but I have a PPK 7.62 that is as sweet a shooting pistol as you would ever want so why in the world go to all the trouble of re designing something that works so well? What was wrong with the PPK that was made during WWII? I have the original box that it came in back in 1943 along with the little cleaning rod and an extra mag and the instruction book that makes the claim of the grips being made of the new plastique. lol. I don’t think I would trade it for any of the new ones though.

    • C J Intrieri guns llc February 8, 2016, 4:09 pm

      Agree with Hulon Lane………the new ppk , looks clumsy and ugly (like most of todays designs) …will take and keep the old .slim ,compact ,beautiful, reliable one.. Why try to improve something already accepted for years . You can keep your hollywood style guns . Rather have beautiful flowing design ,craftsmanship, quality, and it’s proven reliability. You can not improve a Stradivarius .

  • Bob Payne January 4, 2016, 6:08 am

    Probably a good gun but butt-ugly.

    • joe January 4, 2016, 9:03 am

      They’ve upstaged glock in that department – no easy task! 🙂

Leave a Comment

Send this to a friend