Mossberg Flex MVP Patrol Rifle Takes AR-15 Mags – SHOT Show 2013

by Administrator on January 17, 2013

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Mossberg Firearms
http://www.mossberg.com/

By Brian Jensen

Mossberg has added to their MVP bolt action rifle series by expanding their Flex line of innovative modular construction. If you didn’t see the Flex Shotgun last year, the design is unique, because it utilizes a completely tool-less system. You pop out the removal lug and pop it back in. There are no parts to lose and no parts to booger with a screwdriver. The Flex system is brilliant and has nothing by great reviews.

The Mossberg MVP rifle series is meant to be a ton of gun for the money, and that succeed at exactly that. This new MVP Patrol rifle is one of those
guns that is purely aimed strait at people needing a patrol-style bolt rifle meant to put meaningful hits downrange, at a reasonable and affordable price. You may not be in law enforcement, but this rifle is light, carries well, and comes with features you’d expect to see in a much higher priced gun.

The MVP Patrol Rifle comes with a 16 ¼” medium bull barrel with a flash hider attachment. Twist rate is 1 in 9 inches for the 5.56 NATO, and 1 in 7 for the 300 AAC Blackout. Currently, the gun only comes in .223/5.56 NATO and .300 AAC Blackout, but come later this year, we’ll see this gun in .308 Win (7.62 NATO) with a 1 in 10 twist rate. The guns range from 6 ¾ lbs to 8 lbs depending on caliber and if it comes as a scoped package.

Sights are a standard rifle setup, with the exception of the 300 AAC. These sights consist of a raised platform rear adjustable rifle sight mounted on the barrel and a fiber optic front blade. The gun also has a picatinny style scope base standard. The Patrol Rifle will come either as the rifle alone, or in a combo with a 3-9 power illuminated scope.

In the 5.56 version it comes with a 10 round magazine but can also use standard AR magazines due to the new bolt design. However, all guns will come standard from the factory with the 10 round magazines. The rifle comes in a polymer stock, with sling mounting studs. All of these guns come with the patented LBR Adjustable trigger. This rifle is also available in the non-Flex mode.

For law enforcement, the value of this weapon is obvious. Sometimes you can’t carry an AR-15 due to the delicate sensitivities of your local bosses. Or maybe, you want something you can put a more accurate, or more potent round downrange with; not a sniper, more like a designated marksman per se.

Even though they called it a Patrol Rifle, this MVP should do equally well in the civilian market. The Flex system makes the gun easy to break down for travel, and the versatility of the accessory features gives you a lot of options for the rifle to grow with you as you enjoy different aspects of our shooting sports. The MVP Patrol Rifle should be available at your dealers soon, and though we didn’t get any pricing information from them, my guess is that it will carry a street price in the under $500 range.

{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

556guy January 17, 2013 at 6:23 pm

Really good idea to use AR mags in a bolt action. Someone should have done that before now .

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George Mathis January 17, 2013 at 8:23 pm

What can you sell me the MVP Patrol Rifle ? I have one hand gun on order.

Thanks…

George

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American January 30, 2013 at 11:53 pm

Now try ENGLISH!

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Irish-7 January 17, 2013 at 10:55 pm

The last Mossberg shotgun that I bought was made in Turkey. What’s up with that? Mossberg advertises that their firearms are made in America. I have not fired it yet, but I am already wishing that I spent more money on the Remington.

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WVHunter February 21, 2013 at 10:15 pm

What model was it? Mossberg has two different lines, the original and Mossberg International, which makes most of the double barrels and I believe the Maverick line. I’m just curious, I always respected Mossberg for producing affordable firearms in America, and if their flagship line is being outsourced than I may have to spend more money on companies with a more honest public relations department.

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Pete Bono January 19, 2013 at 9:46 am

How much for Mossberg MVP Flex in 223? Where can I find one?

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Dustin January 25, 2013 at 12:30 am

Very interesting. Now on another note, someone was slacking at the grammar and spell check desk, lol.

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Chaney Sparks January 26, 2013 at 2:55 am

Hello,
my name is Chaney Sparks. I am 28 years old,I have lived in this great state of alaska for 26 of those years. My father and mother have lived here since they were young and have raised me with a great appreciation for the land and its resources, and that Alaska truly is the last frontier. As a young man with a family I can’t help but think about and worry what the future holds for us all as American citizens with regards to these proposed gun laws. There seems to be so much focus on the removal of guns and or gun accessories that supposedly make firearms more deadly, laws like limiting mags to ten rounds. Making the shooter reload more times therefore increasing response time. Vice President Biden uses slogans like “just save one life if u can”. It takes one and a half seconds to reload with a little practice. Well lets think about that for a min and reflect on the decision of a California school district that purchased several high powered AR type rifles. There plan is to train first responders with these weapons systems safety, when to shoot practices, storage and security for the weapons. This decision was made before the sandy hook shooting. I can not help but to think of what might have happened that day if there had been a response plan set up for the children at sandy hook? How many lives would that have saved ? Using the same arguments that our vise president uses about the magazine size. Why would you restrict the people that are to protect our children to low capacity mags? Or restrict my right as a father to protect my family against criminals that will most certainly have large capacity mags and if they do not have large capacity mags tell me why I shouldn’t have him out gunned ! We are a country made of fathers, mothers, children, brothers and sisters. I am one all of these, I will always be a protector to my family, and to those who can not protect themselves. We are a young country and Alaska an even younger state. We are a free country. A privilege not experienced by all nations in this world. I worry about the day that we as a country have to step up as one to defend itself from threat, foreign and domestic if we are limited to ten rounds this will be one BIG step closer to a country where the criminals will have large capacity mags and it will be illegal for me, a law-abiding citizen to have to protect my family with. We need to look at world , history in other country’s were gun control was a first step to there fall. I can’t help but think of what the Obama administration would think if you told them that their secret service that protects his family were limited to ten round mags, they might use the argument that its deferent he’s the president or that its a matter of national security. I think it is very clear where America’s future rights and security lay, with president Obama. Please for Alaska, for America, for our future which is in our children, take this fight to the top and maintain our second amendment rights.
Sincerely,
Chaney Sparks

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Dallas Wiebelhaus February 1, 2013 at 7:36 am

I’m a Ruger fanboy, like completely gay for Ruger but this flex system is freaking cool!

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John smith February 1, 2013 at 7:39 am

Well said my Alaskan friend. I truly believe the same thing. When they elected Obama they didn’t think our country would get this bad. His slogan was change, but this is ridiculous he should just bow out and go home. Banning guns for good citizens is not the answer. Fix AB109 keep bad guys in jail. They get out and commit the same crimes. Use death penalty more often for violent criminals that will work !

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Administrator July 30, 2013 at 11:48 am

Ask your local dealer to check his distributors.

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