Remington 9mm R51 Sub-compact Pistol: The Birth of a New Classic—Shot Show 2014

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Remington12Remington Arms Company

http://www.remington.com/

If the popularity of the 101-year-old Browning-designed Model 1911 pistol tells us anything, it’s that great guns get even better through the application of modern technology. Remington took a page out of that playbook in the design of its newest pistol, the 9mm R51. What today is a beautiful sub-compact concealed carry gun started in 1917 as the Remington Model 51, designed by John Pederson. Pederson was a contemporary of John Browning, who called him “the greatest gun designer in the world.” Remington based its new gun on the Pederson design, resulting in a pistol with a crisp trigger, reliable action and a low bore to reduce felt recoil.

Remington5In a world awash in polymer guns, it’s nice to see an innovative and functional all-metal pistol, especially with the lines of the R51. An aluminum alloy frame and stainless steel barrel and slide combine for a relatively low weight of 22 ounces. The R51 is completely ambidextrous, with magazine release buttons on both sides of the grip and a very interesting approach to an ambi safety. Rather than being a thumb switch, the safety is built into the backstrap. As you take a firing grip on the pistol, the safety comes off without your having to even think about it. But Remington seems to have thought of everything. There’s even a suppressor-ready barrel available as an option. They say that form follows function. If that’s the case, I can’t wait to shoot the new R51.Remington3Remington2Remington7Remington9Remington10Remington1Remington6Remington8Remington11

{ 174 comments }

{ 170 comments… add one }

  • petru Sova January 16, 2014, 11:08 am

    I would not consider buying this gun as they did not put a manual safety on it like the original gun had. It is not safe to carry it with a round in the chamber. The trigger design also makes the gun look really cheap.

    • Vic January 16, 2014, 11:50 am

      What is the advantage of a manual safety over the safety built into this gun?

    • Bret Schlueter January 16, 2014, 12:49 pm

      I guess revolvers are taboo for you, too, since they don’t have external safeties either. I take you also aren’t a fan of keeping your finger off of the trigger until ready to fire…
      As for the trigger, it has that same cheesy look as “cheap looking” high end 1911 triggers, that no ones seems to like or buy, hence the extensive variety of them.
      I doubt Remington will miss your business…

      • sunhawg January 16, 2014, 2:21 pm

        Based on his comments, I have the impression that petru Sova does not have much (if any) knowledge or experience with firearms. He’s either very ignorant or he’s just another internet troll looking for an argument. Come to think of it, some of the other commenters about this pistol might want to wait until they see the specs before jumping to conclusions. Remington has been making fine pistols before most of them were born.

        • petru Sova January 16, 2014, 4:43 pm

          Alright I guess I have to explain it in simplistic terms for all you Jethro Bodines out there. This pistol can go off when holstering the gun. When you push the gun into the holster if the holster is not made for this specific model the trigger could catch and your hand would be pushing against the grip safety which would deactivate it.

          Also when drawing the gun you would automatically squeeze the grip in a threat situation deactivating the gripe safety while drawing it. Now if your finger accidentally snags the trigger with either hand while thrusting the gun forward it accidentally fires the short stroke single action pull.

          Also if you were foolish enough to lay the gun down loaded and a child suddenly snatched it up ( as actually happened in Chicago with a Police Glock gun) the child accidentally fired the gun killing herself all in the blink of an eye. Now if the Gun had been the 100 plus year old 1911 (back when they actually made guns safer) the child would have had to not only squeeze the safety but also know how to deactivate the manual safety as well or if the hammer was down would have had to been strong enough and knowledgeable enough to cock the hammer and then pull the trigger too.

          Remember too this is a single action gun not a double action gun with a long heavy double action trigger pull. Its short light trip off makes it way easier even for an experienced gun handler when he is tired, or distracted to accidentally trip the trigger on this gun. If one was foolish enough to stuff this gun in a coat pocket and then attempt to grab it out of the coat pocket being a single action it could very well go off in the pocket as one was pulling it out and do not think that there are not a lot of people that are going to carry this gun like that, they will, guaranteed.

          These are just a few scenario’s that could and eventually will happen when one carries a single action type gun that does not have a strong detent manual safety. Am I getting through to any of you yet?

          • 357pig January 16, 2014, 6:09 pm

            petru Sova = runs with scissors (probably should not own a gun)

          • David January 16, 2014, 10:00 pm

            1st rule of stupidity…
            Using a holster not specifically designed for your handgun.

          • Caligula January 18, 2014, 12:19 pm

            You’re never going to make a firearm “safe” absolutely, and there are plenty of stories of individuals forgetting to de-activate the safety on their firearm during a self-defense scenario. Anyone who leaves a chambered pistol on a table knowing that there is a child that could gain access is a negligent fool, and guilty of a criminal offense in most states. Fools will always find ways to make fool-proof products fool worthy. Finally, if a person doesn’t know to keep their finger out of the trigger well when holstering a firearm, they are poorly trained or simply negligent. Safeties will never trump training and simple common sense. Hundreds of thousands of police and civilians carry chambered Glocks every day in this nation, and there isn’t an “unintended” discharge epidemic with Glocks.

          • Caligula January 18, 2014, 12:24 pm

            You claim that the Remington is a single action, short trigger pull. However, I just read and viewed a few videos that state the trigger is a light, smooth, but long double-action pull. I think you should make sure you have all of the correct facts before passing final judgement.

          • rVLn-4 January 18, 2014, 4:57 pm

            safety is a way of life, not a button or switch. if you dont have a safety mind set, then your endangering everyone you come in contact with.

          • John January 18, 2014, 9:17 pm

            Are you serious?

          • Robert January 19, 2014, 10:58 am

            It actually has a rather long trigger pull. It is not intended to have the short 1911 style trigger pull I believe you think it has. The R51 has a long pull with a 5-6 pound crisp break at the end. Also, like the original 51, the grip safety is not as easy to accidentally apply as you suggest.

            The R51 is not for everyone, however I am used to carrying other guns without external safeties and I figure this one won’t be much different.

            I am looking forward to owning the R51.

          • Stormtrooper January 19, 2014, 7:43 pm

            Who said it had a short trigger pull? Not Remington… Because they say it it has a long trigger pull. I don’t know where you get your information but please stop spreading bullshit.

          • Stormtrooper January 19, 2014, 7:44 pm

            Who said it had a short trigger pull? Not Remington… Because they say it it has a long trigger pull. I don’t know where you get your information but please stop spreading bullshit.

          • Army127 January 27, 2014, 2:28 am

            Listen Petru you are of course almost completely incorrect in everything you say here, which follows course by the way, since you have made comments on many other blogs here looking for a fight! The R51 with a Pederson action is designed to have a long trigger pull with a clean crisp 5lb break at the end of the pull. It is not a single action gun, it is a double action weapon with a long pull, so many of the senarios you describe could not happen unless you tried to accomplish them on purpose. As for the grip safety it is not the same type as on a 1911 so it wouldn’t activate as easily either. Any person with proper training would enjoy the R51 as a great addition to their carry guns, or it would be an excellent first concealed carry weapon as well. I for one am looking forward to adding one to my safe and being a properly trained and knowledgable gun owner, will purchase the proper holster to go with it and enjoy carrying it in my carry line up.

            As usual you just wanted to try to get people angry with no idea of what you are talking about! So please just stop the annoying posting and go somewhere else with your ridiculousness! Please don’t post here anymore unless you have some knowledgable constructive criticism or just something with quality knowledgable content in it to post. It becomes annoying to have to prove you wrong all the time and make you look silly and make you embarrass yourself. Thanks

            Army127 ( NRA Life member, certified NRA Rifle and Pistol Instructor, 15+ years in the US Army ) in case Mr. Petru wanted to question my knowledge. Oh and 2 Tours in Iraq and combat wounded!

          • arnold February 1, 2014, 12:01 am

            As I watched the video of the function of this gun, it appeared to me immediately that it is a single action. The trigger appearance seems to be for a single action also, and resembling the trigger of a 1911, that suggests it is single. I have read from the Remington site and can find no definite answer. Where is the source of info you guys can direct us to to confirm it is double action. All that I have seen indicates a single action, like the old Colts pocket models ’03, 04 and 08.

          • Biff Sarin February 7, 2014, 12:22 pm

            @Petru
            Well then you better stay away from the immensely popular Ruger LCP. It has absolutely ZERO built in safeties. And yet there are still three ‘safeties’ you have with the LCP, the DAO trigger, a good (trigger blocking LCP designed) holster, and, last but not least, a healthy respect for and appreciation of firearms. I sometimes carry the LCP in a pocket holster and strangely, in all of my training with it, I have never had either of my fingers ‘slip’ into the trigger guard unintentionally. As for the holster either not being made for the gun or being worn out and misshapen (as some old leather holsters tend to become), well, that falls under the ‘healthy respect’ category. I don’t drive my car with tires that are bald or the wrong size for my vehicle either.

            While you’re at it, check out the Sig Sauer P226 MK25 (standard issue sidearm for U.S. Navy Seals). Show me a single manual safety on that gun. Soooo, reach back and put your panties out of your arse and quit whining.

          • jay April 29, 2014, 3:01 pm

            Siiggghhhh… some thoughts in reply to petru Sova-
            As for firing when holstering- that only happens when holstering with you finger on the trigger. Comes as a result of lack of training. As for the child shooting herself with the Glock, a responsible adult should not have left a loaded firearm unattended anywhere near a child’s grasp. Besides, It’s not like they are designed to be difficult to manipulate. Sadly, all too often a child’s curious fingers have succeeded in releasing a manual safety anyway. Again, a responsible adult is not (or at least should not!) be very likely to just stuff a loaded pistol into a coat pocket. Holsters that protect the trigger ARE made specifically for pocket carry you know (or should).
            What you are looking for is a manufacturer to protect yourself from taking personal training and responsibility. Neither is a manual safety an end all for preventing disaster. Accidents almost always are the result of operator error and nearly as often are preventable. It is incumbent upon anyone who would pick up a gun to train and conduct themselves with that weapon in a safe manner. Mechanical safeties can never take the place of personal responsibility, nor should they.

          • donhit May 26, 2014, 9:22 am

            Are you related to Dianne Feinstein? There is just no sense in what you say

          • jack May 29, 2014, 4:55 pm

            You, sir, are a fuking idiot. Why the hell would you lay a loaded gun down around a child. Also, if you keep your fuking finger (or dik skinner if you prefer) off the goddamn trigger, the gun will not go off! Stop watching so much TV.

        • RussellW January 16, 2014, 10:44 pm

          By all the name-calling, and fear hysteria, and ‘I am smarter than you” comments, I have to believe that Mr. petru Sova makes some sense that has hit a nerve with the less objective and not so serious minded intelligent firearm enthusiast.

          • Caligula January 18, 2014, 12:09 pm

            It has a grip safety. Most guns now have drop and firing pin safeties. Manual safeties are superfluous on a CCW weapon, and are more likely to get you killed when you need the weapon to go bang and it doesn’t because you forgot to turn the safety off. Quite frankly, if the lack of an external, manual safety is a deal killer for you, perhaps you’re better off as well as everyone else, carrying pepper spray for self defense. No name calling. Are you satisfied?

          • Robert January 19, 2014, 11:01 am

            I think this is the classic case of someone believing that more safeties = “safety”. Remington did not make an unsafe pistol. They made a pistol for safe people. No pistol is safe in the hands of someone who is not willing to treat it with care and respect.

          • Jay April 29, 2014, 3:08 pm

            RussellW Hit a nerve? yes. Fear hysteria? Where? That sounds like a description of what we’ve been replying to… It is Mr. petru Sova’s NON-sense that hit that nerve! It sure wasn’t the result of any brilliance on his part and most of the comments in reply I have read have been short of name calling (not easy in this case) and much more intelligent and informed than any comment of his.

      • T January 19, 2014, 11:26 am

        I think you’ve nailed it Bret…………….

    • Actually January 16, 2014, 1:01 pm

      I can understand that, but I think that’s a matter of opinion; one could argue it’s not safe to carry with a round in the chamber and the manual safety on because when you need to use your gun the most, you might not be able to flip the safety off in time despite training for it diligently.

      Modern handguns don’t go off unless you pull the trigger, so as long as you practice good trigger discipline and aren’t using a really low quality holster, you should be good to go without a trigger safety.

      It does have a grip safety I think though.

      • Daniel Raidt January 16, 2014, 2:11 pm

        Yes it has a grip safety like my SR1911 Ruger. I will buy this gun and have it already paid for on Pre order.

    • Darrell January 16, 2014, 1:06 pm

      A backstrap safety is not safe? I agree about how the trigger looks.. fix it…. Nice update of a classic looking gun. I hope it is reliable…. trigger pull is what??

      • Robert January 19, 2014, 11:03 am

        Long takeup with crisp 5-6 pound release

    • BryanP January 16, 2014, 1:42 pm

      It’s no less safe than a Glock. It has passive safeties instead of active safeties. Where the Glock uses a passive trigger bar safety, this will use a passive grip safety. In either case you have to have an active grip on the gun and press the trigger in order for it to fire.

      In any case, if you prefer active safeties there are any number of guns out there you can choose from.

    • Alvia January 16, 2014, 2:02 pm

      Not to be disrespectful, but I guess you miss the part where he said the safety is in the back-strap. When you draw, you do so from a holster, on belt, pocket, etc. and when you take the firing grip, then the safety is disengaged. Many guns out there with no manual safeties, so you are limiting your self. But hey this is America, you can express your opinions, and pays your money and takes your choice. I suppose you wouldn’t want the new Glock M42 either!

    • Mr. Dusty January 17, 2014, 1:12 am

      The trigger does look kinda cheap, doesn’t it? I’m also surprised at the comments from the moron who made snide comments about Revolvers and keeping your finger off the trigger…if he had a little more tact then I’d assume he worked for Remington lol. I personally would have preferred the manual safety myself (particularly in this world full of Glunks and trigger safeties that make the M&P type guns feel like they have a three stage pull) but, so long as this gun is fundamentally identical to the original internally, then I’d like one.

      If not then, sadly, it’s just another look-a-like that smears the name of perhaps the best handgun ever made.

    • Caligula January 18, 2014, 12:06 pm

      It has a grip safety. Most guns now have drop and firing pin safeties. Manual safeties are superfluous on a CCW weapon, and are more likely to get you killed when you need the weapon to go bang and it doesn’t because you forgot to turn the safety off. Quite frankly, if the lack of an external, manual safety is a deal killer for you, perhaps you’re better off as well as everyone else, carrying pepper spray for self defense.

      • Robert January 19, 2014, 11:09 am

        Ever used pepper spray Caligula? That stuff is hard to operate! Flip safeties, crazy long trigger pull (button press?
        ) and a much greater chance of hitting unintended targets! I think the safe thing might be to carry a small stick or a maybe a list of really harsh words.

    • Steve January 31, 2014, 4:28 pm

      Petru,

      You need to be better informed before you comment on something you clearly know nothing about. The PA51 design, the basis for this new gun utilized a unique combination lever on the rear of the grip-frame that acts as a safety, bolt hold-open device and bolt release. The pistol came was far ahead of its time. Glock promotes their pistols multiple, intuitive safety systems and advanced human engineering. These features Pedersen pioneered over half a century earlier. Self defense pocket pistols shouldn’t be carried by people who don’t know how to handle a loaded weapon. The open trigger design you think looks cheap is found on many high quality guns such as the Colt Gold Cup National Match so your opinion doesn’t count for much.

    • pismopal February 8, 2014, 7:43 pm

      Don’t buy it! That means I move up one number. Pistols are mostly as safe as the operator and many people who consider themselves experts are not. There is not much to be done about that.

    • Ron February 19, 2014, 4:49 am

      You are wrong!!! The safety is build into the grip, just like the grip safety on the 1911′s of springfield’s. You can’t pull the trigger unless you have a proper grip on the gun.

  • ARguy January 16, 2014, 11:38 am

    There must be a safety somewhere on the gun. Otherwise it could fire with a simple pull of the trigger. I think the backstrap is the safety (1911).

  • Good January 16, 2014, 11:40 am

    It appears the safety is directly above the skeletonized trigger (doesn’t look cheap to me)

  • Steve McElroy January 16, 2014, 11:45 am

    Most people wouldn’t buy it if it had a manual safety and do you really believe that Remington would put a gun out that was not safe to carry with a round in the chamber?

    Looking forward to picking one up and giving it a try.

  • Charles Knaack January 16, 2014, 11:53 am

    That is one ugly gun! Shades of a Flash Gordon space pistol. Reminds me of the old failed Remington 600 “modern” looking rifle.

    • Scott January 17, 2014, 1:11 am

      I like it. First thing I thought of is a Kimber for a couple hundies less!!

    • Robert January 19, 2014, 11:10 am

      To each his own…I find it quite attractive!

  • E mort January 16, 2014, 12:08 pm

    Who cares what features it has. That thing is horrible looking! Reminds me of a high point.

    • Joel January 17, 2014, 12:48 am

      Have you owned or shot a hi-point? I do. Have you owned or used the R51? I haven’t. So like my hi-point, I’ll wait and do my research BEFORE I pass judgement. Or were you just commenting on the looks of the hi-point, and not it’s funtionality?

    • john Doesky January 20, 2014, 12:45 am

      A Hipoint and an R51 is just about as far as you can get away from each other on the spectrum of gun styling and shape.

  • IndepGunsmithing January 16, 2014, 12:15 pm

    Nice pistol. The lack of an external safety does not make a pistol “unsafe”. Glock, Ruger, S&W, Ruger, and countless other companies have designed pistols without an external safety. I did confirm that it has a firing pin safety. I doubt that Remington is putting out a pistol that will fire if dropped, shaken or stared at intently. They have too many lawyers on the payroll for that.

  • RK Smith January 16, 2014, 12:32 pm

    Would have been better if they had just copied the original exactly as it is a fantastic gun. That thing is funky looking!

  • Donald Lester III January 16, 2014, 12:39 pm

    Great for Remington! The grip safety is more than adequate, no other safety is needed and would be redundant having another thumb safety. Slim & trim carry pistol in 9mm is easily concealed & I hope to find one to purchase soon. Just the right size & weight wanted for CCW. Remington has scored positive with the perfect size & caliber for warm weather carry!

  • Arthur C. Nicholas January 16, 2014, 12:46 pm

    Yes petru Sova. You should not buy it, because you are not careful enough to read the description. The pistol has a passive grip safety, similar to the Model 1911 or the H&K Model P7 M8; Both of these models are classic and rare. In other words, it will not fire unless you are properly holding the pistol when ready to shoot. You should also stay away from all revolvers, knives hammers and forks because we wouldn’t want you to hurt yourself.

  • Alvin York January 16, 2014, 12:51 pm

    Good for you Petru, I will buy 2 of them now, one for me and one for my wife. You need to go through a gun safety course to learn how too hold and shoot a gun it sounds like to me.

  • Alvin York January 16, 2014, 12:52 pm

    Good for you Petru, I will buy 2 of them now, one for me and one for my wife. You need to go through a gun safety course to learn how too hold and shoot a gun it sounds like to me.

  • Ryan January 16, 2014, 12:53 pm

    It has a manual safety – the grip safety. I regularly carry a CW9 – no safety of any kind.

  • Bob Shirley January 16, 2014, 12:55 pm

    What is unsafe about it? It has a passive safety, same as a Glock or numerous other modern designs. Skeletonized trigger, like many 1911s.

  • Gary Stelter Sr. January 16, 2014, 1:02 pm

    Why in the world would you want a manual safety with this ingenious grip safety design? The faster a defense pistol like this gets into action, the better the chances for it’s owner’s survival. Remington knows what they are doing.

  • Mark Robinson January 16, 2014, 1:08 pm

    Last time I checked, the backstrap safety counts as a manual safety.
    “Rather than being a thumb switch, the safety is built into the backstrap.”

  • Jim January 16, 2014, 1:10 pm

    I like it except for the trigger. trigger just doesn’t look right with it. What’s the price?

    • TRob ARob January 16, 2014, 11:32 pm

      Cost is supposed to start around $389

    • rVLn-4 January 18, 2014, 5:01 pm

      unless you actually pulled the trigger, how do you know you don’t like it. i want remington to dis-assemble the weapon and i want to see how reliable it is in ice, snow, mud, dirt and sand.

      • Robert January 19, 2014, 11:17 am

        I think he means he does not like the look or style of the trigger. Also, please remember that this is a carry pistol not a “combat” pistol. I don’t think it is intended for a lot of dirt and ice. By the way, there are some good Youtube videos of the pistol dis-assembly. Use your “googler” for more info! :)

  • Bob Bray January 16, 2014, 1:18 pm

    I agree a safety or trigger safety/ disconnect should be there since the hammer is at full cock when a round is chambered. While I’ve relied on it for years,a grip safety alone isn’t for everyone. It’s a liability waiting to happen. A Glock trigger is the easiest fix.
    The original design should have been kept and beefed up only as needed for 9mm application; the weak link was the floating breechblock that could crack with overloads, otherwise the original 51 was a perfect pocket pistol.
    You could point it in the dark and expect to hit your target.

    • Robert January 19, 2014, 11:18 am

      This sweetheart is +p rated so I think the beefing up is complete!

  • James January 16, 2014, 1:19 pm

    I would buy one. A good holster always blocks the trigger from unwanted bumps. Not to say a slide lock as on the 1911 would not be in order. But what I would like to know is how hard is it to pull that slide back and load the chamber? So far there have been several articles on the R51 but no one even mentions racking the action to load a round. Most blowbacks that are stationary barrels have an extremely hard slide to pull back. I know it’s is one of the detractors of this type of design, so it should be addressed for comparison with other models.

    • JimA January 16, 2014, 2:03 pm

      On the Remington website there is a video of the R51. The guy presenting it claims it’s the easiest to rack of all the subcompacts. Then he holds the slide and racks it with his index finger.

      • Daddio7 January 16, 2014, 4:47 pm

        I may have to look into one of these. I have a week left hand and have to rack my FNS 9mm with my right and then swap hands.

    • Robert January 19, 2014, 11:21 am

      Extremely light racking force required. Unique spring setup and ultra unique action lets Remington build a pistol with one finger slide racking!

  • Robert Smith January 16, 2014, 1:44 pm

    It’s great to see Remington mining the treasure-trove of their antique/historical arms. I liked that Remington got back to making handguns with the 1911 R1, but it was an odd choice. Dozens of other companies make them and the 1911 has no historical connection the company. The R51 is more like it. Next how about a repro of a Smoot or Sawhandle revolver? Updated to handle a modern round, of course. I’d love to shoot one.

    • Grady January 16, 2014, 2:41 pm

      Check your history book Robert and you will find that Remington manufactured a lot of 1911′s for both WW1 and WW11.

      • Fred January 16, 2014, 6:32 pm

        Remington manufactured 1911s for WWI. However, the company didn’t manufacture 1911A1s for WWII. A company named Remington-Rand, that was a typewriter manufacturer, made 1911A1s for the war effort in the early 1949s. I have one it’s one of my favorite 1911s. Remington-Rand had a similar sounding name to Remington. However, they where separate businesses.

        • s.Dow January 18, 2014, 3:14 am

          I have a Remington-Rand 1911A1 ,too. It belonged to my father. He got it in some sort of deal. A fellow showed up at the state office building with a load of them, each wrapped in brown rust resistant coated paper, in the back of a pick-up truck. You had to pay $ 50 for one, and you could not inspect it before you paid for it. The one he chose had never been fired. Others were essentially parts guns, and everything in between. It has probably had 400 rounds of military ammunition run through it. This happened in the late 1950′s or early 1960′s. Indeed Remington Rand made typewriters, and adding machines, both manually operated. The guys buying the pistols all worked for the Game and Fish Commission, but it was a sale to an individual- not a duty weapon.
          I don’t know how the $50 would translate into today’s money, but at that time if you made $ 10,000 a year, working for the state, you were considered a big deal. Dad didn’t make that kind of money, and had a master’s degree- He had to go federal to get into that kind of money. It’s as accurate as any 1911A1 made for the military back then. A national guardsman that won national matches in the guard shooting those 45′s tried it, and said the only recommendation he would make, is to never file on it, trying to make it better- it would ruin it, so it’s never been altered in any way. He showed us how accurate it was. Made me embarrassed to ever try to shoot it.

        • Robert January 19, 2014, 11:35 am

          They were at one time the same company. From Remington’s history page:

          1873 – E. Remington & Sons embarked on a new venture, and in September of 1873, the first Remington typewriters were produced.

          1886 – Remington sells the typewriter business. This business would later become Remington Rand, then Sperry Rand.

  • Jake January 16, 2014, 1:50 pm

    Nice! I want one. When are they going to hit Midwest dealers?

    Jake

  • Guy January 16, 2014, 2:03 pm

    All you doubters should check this out before putting down a product you know nothing about! Right from Remington.
    http://www.1911r1.com/pages/Support/model-r51-video

    • JCitizen January 16, 2014, 4:47 pm

      Cool video Guy! Thanks for the link – I recommend everyone check it out! Now I know why General Patton preferred the Model 51 as his concealed carry pistol!

  • Jeremy January 16, 2014, 2:16 pm

    Petru Sova, If you read the actual reviews of this gun from those who participated in the testing a few months back then you would know more about the automatic safety and that it isn’t a safety free gun. The back grip safety is one of the most trusted with handguns now days. Considering the higher percentage of all 1911′s have this exact feature. But you are worried about carrying with a round in the chamber. The issue I have here is, that if you are a responsible CC adult, then you understand the safety rules as they apply to guns, you never put your finger on the trigger unless you intend to fire, you never point a weapon at anything you do not intend to shoot, etc. I am not going to go on and on you can google those yourself. But I will tell you that I was in the military for 5 years, I hunted and carried guns since the age of 10. I have hunted now for almost 20 years. And with the vast amount of weapons experience I’ve had, and the number of times I have carried not only a fully automatic rifle but also a Side arm as well, I will tell you this. User error is the number one cause of firearm related incidents. Not the weapon. Tons of people want to find a place to lay the blame and 99.99% of the time it is soley on the person who was carrying the said weapon. The idea with the Grip safety though is that this weapon can only be fired with the hand gripped firmly around the handle and the trigger pulled at the same time. If you drop this weapon and it hits the ground a round will not magically fire of its own accord, nor will the weapon fire in your holster if you slide it in and the trigger is snagged. The rear grip safety is made so that you have to have a combination of actions to fire a round. Now the one draw back is that if you have children in the house, which I do not. But if you do have children I would agree this is not a gun to have in your home. I know that storage of firearms around children is paramount, but in the off chance that a child is older and gains access to a firearm then you are putting that child at risk with a point and shoot weapon. But if you have them locked up as stated in all firearm literature then you shouldn’t have a problem. I personally not having children yet, like having a firearm ready nearby so that if I have an intruder I can be ready and not have to run to a closet and fumble for the 15 seconds to unlock my weapon. But hey to each their own….

    • petru Sova January 16, 2014, 9:12 pm

      “Quote: nor will the weapon fire in your holster if you slide it in and the trigger is snagged. The rear grip safety is made so that you have to have a combination of actions to fire a round Quote”

      Now think about what you just said. It makes no mechanical sense whatsoever. When you shove this gun in a holster the palm of your hand is depressing the grip safety and this enables the trigger to be pushed back or snagged back and fire the gun. It can happen holstering the gun, shoving it in the waist band or shoving it in a coat pocket. The gun will fire and in a split second before you even realize you have snagged the trigger.

      If you disbelieve me because of lack of mechanical understanding borrow a Browning 1910 and with the safety off and the gun cocked (but of course empty unless you want to commit suicide) shove it in your waist band a few times, I guarantee you even with its stiff grip safety the palm of your had will shove the grip safety forward and when the trigger is snagged it will release the striker and if it has a round in the chamber it will fire.

  • Dennis January 16, 2014, 2:18 pm

    It’s unfortunate but not unexpected that novices would criticize a semi-automatic pistol without a manual safety. Obviously, they don’t understand how to handle firearms. A handguns primary purpose is for defense, nothing should slow that function of drawing and firing. So you don’t like revolvers either? Or, have you ever even fired a handgun?

    • petru Sova January 16, 2014, 4:03 pm

      Alright I guess I have to explain it in simplistic terms for all you Jethro Bodines out there. This pistol can go off when holstering the gun. When you push the gun into the holster if the holster is not made for this specific model the trigger could catch and your hand would be pushing against the grip safety which would deactivate it.

      Also when drawing the gun you would automatically squeeze the grip in a threat situation deactivating the gripe safety while drawing it. Now if your finger accidentally snags the trigger with either hand while thrusting the gun forward it accidentally fires the short stroke single action pull.

      Also if you were foolish enough to lay the gun down loaded and a child suddenly snatched it up ( as actually happened in Chicago with a Police Glock gun) the child accidentally fired the gun killing herself all in the blink of an eye. Now if the Gun had been the 100 plus year old 1911 (back when they actually made guns safer) the child would have had to not only squeeze the safety but also know how to deactivate the manual safety as well or if the hammer was down would have had to been strong enough and knowledgeable enough to cock the hammer and then pull the trigger too.

      Remember too this is a single action gun not a double action gun with a long heavy double action trigger pull. Its short light trip off makes it way easier even for an experienced gun handler when he is tired, or distracted to accidentally trip the trigger on this gun. If one was foolish enough to stuff this gun in a coat pocket and then attempt to grab it out of the coat pocket being a single action it could very well go off in the pocket as one was pulling it out and do not think that there are not a lot of people that are going to carry this gun like that, they will, guaranteed.

      These are just a few scenario’s that could and eventually will happen when one carries a single action type gun that does not have a strong detent manual safety. Am I getting through to any of you yet?

    • RussellW January 16, 2014, 10:43 pm

      By all the name-calling, and fear hysteria, and ‘I am smarter than you” comments, I have to believe that Mr. petru Sova makes some sense that has hit a nerve with the less objective and not so serious minded intelligent firearm enthusiast.

      • Mr. Dusty January 17, 2014, 5:18 am

        I couldn’t agree with you more! I’ve noticed a lot of ignorance and blatant insults flying around simply because, lo and behold, someone doesn’t like grip safeties! Even with a grip safety there is still the possibility (albeit small) that something could catch on the trigger, since you depress the grip safety by gripping it…hence the name. There are already too many “trigger safety” guns out there with horrid accuracy out of the box (Smith and Wesson M&P is the worst I’ve dealt with), and even the Glock’s unobtrusive trigger safety does little for it’s rather…”generous” tolerances which lead to less than precise accuracy. Sure 3.5″ at 20 yards is adequate for self defense but the CZ-75 is capable of under 2″ with garbage ammo.

        I’ll go ahead and jump back on topic before I ramble on too far…but you’d think that there would be less idiocy in a moderated comment section. It’s not an entirely fresh path (you’ll never see sparks fly harder than when you admit you’re not a fan of 1911′s or their grip safety) but come on! You’d think these people were circa 1950′s Rednecks who’s wife was just insulted…

        The Remington M51, in origin, was and is still considered by many to be one of if not THE best pocket pistol ever made. Many sources tout the experimental .45 ACP model as having been more accurate, more reliable, less complicated, and exhibiting FAR less felt recoil than the 1911. Plenty of questions surround the reasoning for abandoning the project…but this, like the introduction of the M16 over the M14, will never be answered honestly by the powers behind their adoption. This is why I can see people being concerned with the lack of the original safety and the look of the new trigger; as the original model was far from needing improvement. Perhaps it was to cut costs due to the literature suggesting Remington dropped the design because of expenses. It surely wouldn’t be the first excellent firearm to ultimately meet it’s end due to pricing problems (Smith and Wesson triple lock, Mauser G98, Pre-64 Model 70 Winchester to name a few).

  • Drew January 16, 2014, 2:26 pm

    Based on what’s been written and the photos that I’ve seen, I’m in for one. It’s definitely different-looking, but I can see that form follows function. As a concealed carry gun, the rounded edges, while giving it a “space ray gun” appearance, keep it from snagging on anything.

    I also find the grip safety adequate for this gun, but, as with its appearance, it’s a matter of personal preference. The one thing that I have a question about is how hard it is to rack the slide. I’d be interested to see it compared to other compact pistols.

  • Ric Carlson January 16, 2014, 2:28 pm

    First time I saw a glimpse of this gun I noticed the rounded edges and really liked the way it looks. I don’t think it will catch on anything and if seven shots won’t get you out of harms way I doubt if 14 would.I like it and am interested.

  • Johnnie Shouse January 16, 2014, 2:35 pm

    Grip safeties have been around since the 1880′s, look at the S&W “Lemon Squeezers” that were produced into the 30′s. I like the look and I’d bet with the Pederson design it will be fairly easy to rack the slide!

  • Johnnie Shouse January 16, 2014, 2:35 pm

    Grip safeties have been around since the 1880′s, look at the S&W “Lemon Squeezers” that were produced into the 30′s. I like the look and I’d bet with the Pederson design it will be fairly easy to rack the slide!

  • Johnnie Shouse January 16, 2014, 2:35 pm

    Grip safeties have been around since the 1880′s, look at the S&W “Lemon Squeezers” that were produced into the 30′s. I like the look and I’d bet with the Pederson design it will be fairly easy to rack the slide!

  • JR January 16, 2014, 2:43 pm

    Does the grip safety remind anyone else of the old lemon sqeezer safty on the S&W .38 snobby?

  • JR January 16, 2014, 2:47 pm

    I do tend to agree with the comments on the looks. I don’t think this one will join my other four Sigs. Not into the funky futuristic look, like that ugly Baretta Nano and the new Walther PPK replacement….ugly as sin!

  • JR January 16, 2014, 2:49 pm

    I’m still waiting on a 9mm light weight commander (1911) R1!

  • William January 16, 2014, 2:57 pm

    I was raised on Colt 1911s. And recently got ride of my Glock 30; great small and 45 caliber, because it did not have an external safety. I like everything about this gun (and would seriously consider purchasing), except the lack of an external safety.

    • William January 16, 2014, 3:00 pm

      Sounds like the government and it’s view on freedom of speach. Don’t bother posting!!!

  • MARK SEVERINO January 16, 2014, 3:01 pm

    do not like it as there is No Uniqueness and looks like parts taken from 5 different guns…

  • matt cook January 16, 2014, 3:10 pm

    Every time a new gun like this comes out you get all these dopey comments on it before anyone has ever had one in their hand. As for me, I think it looks cheap and I would rather have my Sig M11 with NO safety but still safer than this because it is carried with the hammer down and a hammer block.

  • Herb King January 16, 2014, 3:18 pm

    Looks a great deal like a Ruger LC9. I have no problem with the grip safety at all but, is this a da/sa or what? From photo, It seems to have a short trigger pull since the trigger is well back. Many have a problem with the long trigger pull on the LC9 and this may be a big plus for the R-51. If it’s double action only, even more reason for no additional safety. Good price also.

  • Ben January 16, 2014, 3:20 pm

    It’s PedersEn, not PedersOn. The Model 51 was designed by Pedersen.

  • Stu January 16, 2014, 3:22 pm

    Hey guys, my new XDM Springfield has a grip safety. Even the new Smith &Wesson M &P has the grip safety, try pulling the trigger without squeezing the safety, it doesn’t work.

  • Gary Carter January 16, 2014, 3:29 pm

    Never again Remington after the nightmare with 770 bolt 308. Never again!

  • Gary Carter January 16, 2014, 3:31 pm

    Never again Remington after the nightmare with 770 bolt 308. Never again!

  • Viettom January 16, 2014, 3:35 pm

    Greetings!

    For me, the first photo of the new Remington pistol made me think someone had found a turn of the century semi-auto, in like new condition?

    I have never seen, nor wanted ANY pistol with a cut-out trigger.

    I look at them all, regardless of brand or cost, and think dirt, grease, lint or a combination of all three.

    The little Remington does not appeal to me, get an ugly Glock and always be ready to fire, or defend yourself.

    Viettom
    San Antonio

  • Rich January 16, 2014, 3:37 pm

    Where’s the safety? Get a life! The safety is behind your eyeballs!

    This is the most decent ‘new’ gun I’ve seen in awhile. Glad to see someone getting away from the cheap, everyone can have one, poly guns…..as originated by Glock. If it can’t be steel; I’ll do with an alloy pistol.

  • Nubby January 16, 2014, 3:43 pm

    I’m missing about 50% of my fingers so a thumb safety is a no go for me. Fumbling around with a bunch of levers is not practical. The perfect grip safety is what I have been looking for if the price is right.

    • TRob ARob January 17, 2014, 12:14 am

      Cost i to begin at around $389

  • Aaron January 16, 2014, 3:51 pm

    I just handled one in the Remington booth at SHOT show and I have to say I was very disappointed. The trigger was anything but crisp, and the action was so gritty I was expecting metal shavings to fall out every time I worked the slide. Maybe it was just a poor quality prototype, but I would expect better from a company like Remington. Regarding the grip safety, it took a bit more effort to disengage than that of a 1911, and I would be concerned that some shooters might have trouble keeping it depressed when firing multiple shots. I would advise anyone interested in purchasing one to handle it first.

  • petru Sova January 16, 2014, 4:01 pm

    Alright I guess I have to explain it in simplistic terms for all you Jethro Bodines out there. This pistol can go off when holstering the gun. When you push the gun into the holster if the holster is not made for this specific model the trigger could catch and your hand would be pushing against the grip safety which would deactivate it.

    Also when drawing the gun you would automatically squeeze the grip in a threat situation deactivating the gripe safety while drawing it. Now if your finger accidentally snags the trigger with either hand while thrusting the gun forward it accidentally fires the short stroke single action pull.

    Also if you were foolish enough to lay the gun down loaded and a child suddenly snatched it up ( as actually happened in Chicago with a Police Glock gun) the child accidentally fired the gun killing herself all in the blink of an eye. Now if the Gun had been the 100 plus year old 1911 (back when they actually made guns safer) the child would have had to not only squeeze the safety but also know how to deactivate the manual safety as well or if the hammer was down would have had to been strong enough and knowledgeable enough to cock the hammer and then pull the trigger too.

    Remember too this is a single action gun not a double action gun with a long heavy double action trigger pull. Its short light trip off makes it way easier even for an experienced gun handler when he is tired, or distracted to accidentally trip the trigger on this gun. If one was foolish enough to stuff this gun in a coat pocket and then attempt to grab it out of the coat pocket being a single action it could very well go off in the pocket as one was pulling it out and do not think that there are not a lot of people that are going to carry this gun like that, they will, guaranteed.

    These are just a few scenario’s that could and eventually will happen when one carries a single action type gun that does not have a strong detent manual safety. Am I getting through to any of you yet?

    • Jim S January 19, 2014, 3:06 pm

      Petru sova:
      I have a SA XD and an XDm. One of the things I like about these guns is the grip safety. When I re-holster the gun I hold the grip in such a way as to not touch the grip safety…. An extra measure of safety over guns without the grip safety. Remember no gun fight is won by how fast you re-holster. When I draw the gun from its holster I position my trigger finger so it ends up on the frame of the gun, not on the trigger guard.
      Safety is in the mind (and actions) of the gun holder.
      I find the R51 interesting and would consider it if I was in the market for another compact. At the price (<$500) it looks like remington might have a winner.

    • Jim S January 19, 2014, 4:41 pm

      Petru:
      Regarding grip safeties: I have a SA XD and an XDm. One of the things I like about these pistols is the grip safety. When I re-holster the gun I hold the grip in such a way that I don’t touch the grip safety. This provides an extra measure of safety. There is no need to re-holster quickly, right? When I draw the weapon, of course I’m disengaging the grip safety with my hand, but I position my index finger so that it ends up along the guns frame, not on the trigger guard.
      Safety is in the user.
      I find the R51 interesting. If I was in the market for a sub compact, I would consider it, especially for the price.

  • petru Sova January 16, 2014, 4:16 pm

    I also forgot to mention a real life incident that took place in 1976 with a gun similar to this new Remington. It operated in the same way but actually also had a manual safety and it still went off. The gun was a high quality all steel Browning Model of 1910 .380 automatic. This model does have a manual safety but a poor detent. Its guaranteed and I mean 100 percent guaranteed that it will accidentally deactivate itself when carrying it. The fellow in question drew this gun not knowing the manual safety was accidentally in the off position and even though the gun does have a relatively stiff grip safety he squeezed the gun hard enough when re-holstering it so that the trigger was then free to trip off when he shoved the gun down in the holster and it fired.

    As the great American philosopher Santiago once said “He that does not know history is condemned to repeat it”.

    • Robert January 19, 2014, 11:32 am

      Finding one-off examples does not prove or dis-prove a point. You don’t want the pistol because it does not have a feature that you value. So what? You are entitled to your wants and desires in your pistol purchases and there are models of handguns out there that will satisfy you. You are not going to win any converts with name calling and un-cited story telling.

      It’s a big world out there with plenty of choices. To each his own!

  • Cicero January 16, 2014, 4:22 pm

    I really like the concept of the R51 in 9mm. A good carry pistol must be slim, like the Colt 1903 pocket hammerless or the original Remington 51. Also like the fact that it is single-action hammer-fired, and polymer-free.

    The thing I don’t like is that this pistol is needlessly ugly. All the unnecessary notches and contours. They’re trying too hard to make it look cool.

  • Dogbreath January 16, 2014, 4:25 pm

    I love what I see and hear about this gun. I probably won’t be able to use one, though, due to XL hands with long fingers. I don’t even dislike the trigger!

  • JCitizen January 16, 2014, 5:10 pm

    I lotta people think those butt ugly Taser pistols look cool, but this one could grow on me. Besides, I think it is the laser site that effects the look the most. Not many sidearms look better by putting those kind of lasers on them, but they are one of the best laser sight designs out there. Either you go for function and ease of employing firepower, or pick a pretty picture of a gun that may not be able to get you out of a jam. My XDS 3.3 is butt ugly, but I instantly saw it was going to be the most powerful compact pistol I could ever use in CCW belly gun. I was even more surprised when I shot it and it actually handled better than my 1911 Remington Rand!

    If you watch the video Guy posted a link to; I think you’ll will be impressed with the rapid fire handling of this pistol! This, by far, blows away all consideration of looks to me!

  • petru Sova January 16, 2014, 5:15 pm

    Another history lesson since most of you who made snide comments to my original post obviously know absolutely nothing of gun history. When the U.S. Military was adopting the 1911 John Browning designed it with no manual safety, only a grip safety. The U.S. Military said , “nothing doing John are you nuts” (or something along those lines) “Don’t you know the recruits will all be accidentally shooting themselves with this gun with no manual safety?” Browning did as he was told and the rest is history. The 1911 got a manual safety.

    Now lets once again look at the new Remington R51. Be honest, how many would carry this gun with a round in the chamber if the Remington had a visible hammer. Would you stuff it in your coat pocket with the hammer cocked back or in your waist band with no holster or would you even carry it in a holster with the hammer cocked back (remember this gun has no manual safety). The truthful answer is that since you could actually see the danger of a weapon with a hammer cocked back and no manual safety not many people would carry it this way (the Remington hammer is concealed- no see, therefore no danger, to the person who does not understand how the Remington gun really works). Wake up, study how a gun really works internally before condemning someone like me who is only trying to warn people about an unsafe design.

    Look at all the accidents the Glock has caused because of its lack of a manual safety. It has a long sorry track record. Remember a few months ago this summer when the Black athlete shot himself in the New York Restaurant or a few years ago the video that went viral when a police chief reached across his desk to pick up his safety-less Glock and shot his finger off. Only a very few examples of Guns going off that were of a very poor unsafe design. The New York police demanded and got a much heavier trigger pull for their safety-less Glocks but alas due to its single action short pull this did not result in much of a solution to officers shooting themselves and others either. If you read the papers you will have already known than more and more police departments are dropping the safety-less Glock for much safer pistols that either have manual safety’s or have long hard double action pulls. You would have to have been living in a cave not to have known about these safety problems with people like the police that must handle guns every day, hundreds of times a day because when you handle a gun like this that many times every day sooner or later being human you will make a mistake.

    People are human, they make mistakes from fatigue, distraction, carelessness, and if you are ever going to accidentally shoot yourself or someone else, guaranteed you will probably do it with a gun with no manual safety and a single action type of pull. There can be no argument because history has already proven it.

    • Chris January 17, 2014, 7:55 am

      I’m not going to call you names petru, as you seem more inexperienced than stupid. I’m following your thought process and your reasoning. However, both are flawed. Glock, S&W, and Springfield are the three biggest manufactures of passive safety pistols. All of them are absent a “manual” safety. All of them are very safe pistols.

      Additional safeties, such as the manual safety on the 1911, are more of a “feel good” measure than a needed item. When used by a trained, responsible individual, passive safety firearms are wonderful tools. If they’re left laying around for curious children to fondle, then bad things can happen. Manual safeties don’t stop the curious, it just takes more curiosity before the bad comes along. That’s not the guns fault, it falls directly on the irresponsible adult that left his/her firearm chilling next to the crib.

      As for holstering “accidents”, buy better holsters, and/or replace old and wore out ones. There’s no reason to drop $500 on the pistol just to hold it with a $5 pouch. There are very few actual firearm accidents. The vast majority of incidents are due to negligence, not dumb luck. It’s negligent to put your firearm into a holster that will snag the bang switch. It’s negligent to leave loaded pistols laying around. It’s negligent to treat a firearm like a toy. Even the most basic of firearms courses teaches the fundamentals of safety. Those fundamentals don’t change with experience, nor with the firearm you’re using. Practice good safety and all modern, and most antique, firearms are safe tools.

  • Plasticlaw January 16, 2014, 5:16 pm

    I am so anxious to shoot this gun. The description of the safety reminds me of the safety on the H&K P7, where you squeeze the front of the grip. In this gun, you squeeze on the back side. If it shoots like the P7, I will love it.

  • Dr. Wiseman January 16, 2014, 5:37 pm

    Anyone familiar with the H&K P7? Carried one for years never had a malfunction, or accidental discharge. Did have one with a Walther PP when I holstered it. Walther says impossible, but it happened.

    • Plasticlaw January 18, 2014, 11:56 pm

      My best shooting pistols ever have been H&K P7s and P10s. Something about squeezing on the handle to release the safety seems to help stabilize the gun for super accurate fire. I wish H&K had kept this design, which IMHO is much superior to the USP. I am hoping that the R51 works as well.

  • Tedminn January 16, 2014, 5:39 pm

    petro: I don’t know why you find it necessary to invent phony issues about guns. I doubt a “manual”safety would help you anyway…you’ve already shot yourself in the foot with every post. Put a manual safety on your keyboard.

  • AG January 16, 2014, 5:40 pm

    When you chose a gun, you must consider your carry options. I would not put most guns in a pocket without a holster. Maybe a small revolver like a S&W Chief’s special without a hammer, but manual safety or not, a semi-auto in a pocket is a bad idea. Manual safeties in the wrong holster or no holster can accidentally be bumped off. Personally, I carry my Sig with a DAK trigger and Glocks and only carry them with a holster with a covered trigger guard. Has there ever been a negligent discharge re-holstering one of these guns. Sure, a shirt or jacket snags the trigger, it can happen. But it can happen with many guns including revolvers. In my Glocks, I use the NY trigger to help prevent that. I hate the trigger but for a carry gun, it is a little safer and in a gunfight, I doubt that I would be thinking, man that trigger is terrible. I also own a KelTec PF9 as a back up. It does not have any active safety. But, it does have a longer trigger pull. I have also seen the manual safety on a 1911 get bumped getting in an out of a car. The bottom line is that you have to adapt your method of carry to the gun. I always use a holster designed for the gun.

  • Bruce L January 16, 2014, 6:49 pm

    I don’t dislike the trigger at all. It looks exactly like what it is – a successful attempt to lighten the gun by reducing unnecessary mass. Why would the trigger need to be solid??

    Also – I understand the concerns about the safety, but come on – like in the history of guns there has NEVER been a “manual safety” gun accidentally discharge? No kid has accidentally fired a “manual safety” gun? Give me a break.

  • glenn w January 16, 2014, 7:12 pm

    Why would you ever use a holster not made for the firearm you are putting in it? I do not even like the gun. You do not need a manual safety if you know your firearm and use you brain

  • glenn w January 16, 2014, 7:12 pm

    Why would you ever use a holster not made for the firearm you are putting in it? I do not even like the gun. You do not need a manual safety if you know your firearm and use you brain

  • on target January 16, 2014, 7:39 pm

    I’ve been shooting since I was 4 years old (now 50) and have shot many guns over the years and don’t see a problem with this one. Requesting one from my wife for my 51st Bday. I shoot ambidextrous and I shoot expert. Seems people should start their kids off early knowing how to shoot and teaching them ballistics. My daughters both shoot all long guns and handguns, my grandchildren are starting to shoot now and know the operation of their firearm.I have firearms with backstrap safetys and none of us have shot ourselves with those. Maybe I can get my 7 year old granddaughter to teach petru Sova how to safely handle the R51.

    • cap n lou January 21, 2014, 10:35 pm

      I bet she would teach him a thing or 2. But make sure you keep petru and his weapon pointed in the right direction, he seems a little discombobulated. Keep your powder dry partner.

  • Apk January 16, 2014, 8:16 pm

    Bottom line, as always… try it before you buy it. Dont listen to others opinions that have never handled/fired/carried it. Buy what you like not what others like.

  • petru Sova January 16, 2014, 8:56 pm

    Now in all honesty how many of you would carry this gun if it had a visible hammer on it cocked back and ready to go off. Answer: not many people would, but what a person cannot see he does not fear especially if he does not understand how this gun works. Its got an internal hammer. Now how many people would put a gun in your waist band with the hammer cocked back and no manual safety or put it in your pocket or even put it in a holster with a visible hammer cocked back and no manual safety? Answer: not many that had their head screwed on straight.

    In 1911 John Browning submitted the 1911 to the U.S. Military with only a grip safety and no manual safety and the Military though he was nuts. The Military demanded a manual safety as they knew that accidental discharges would result. Has no one ever learned anything from history?

    • John January 18, 2014, 11:59 am

      Excellent point. I am amazed at all these experienced handgunners who seem to think nothing of carrying in Condition 0 in the office, supermarket, even at home. Insanity!

      BTW, I love the looks of the new Remington, and will buy one…for carry in Condition 2.

      • John January 19, 2014, 12:13 am

        Excuse the typo, Condition 3.

  • petru Sova January 16, 2014, 9:31 pm

    And don’t forget to ask Remington if they are using MIM cast parts in the R51 like they are in their R1 1911 guns. I won one of these R 1911 .45 acp guns in a drawing but when I got it home I went to the NRA web site and found an early article on it detailing that it was polluted with the brittle and unreliable MIM cast parts I immediately without ever even taking it out of the box sold it and got “a real 1911″, one with forged reliable parts. Would anyone be foolish enough to trust their life to a gun with MIM cast parts in it? MIM cast part failures along with graphic pictures of such are talked about on just about every gun web site in cyber space.

    • Administrator January 16, 2014, 9:34 pm

      Excuse me Smith and Wesson has mim cast hammers and even barrels and they work just fine.

      • petru Sova January 18, 2014, 10:44 am

        “Quote: Administrator January 16, 2014 at 9:34 pm

        Excuse me Smith and Wesson has mim cast hammers and even barrels and they work just fine Quote”

        Your right in regards to S&W using MIM cast “hammers” but please show me some documents or references to S&W using MIM cast to make barrels. Ruger tried using “traditional castings” (which are much stronger than MIM castings) decades ago and their traditional cast barrels blew up when they experimented with making them. Ruger then outsourced and bought barrels from companies in the U.S. that specialized in nothing but making barrels awarding contracts to the lowest bidder. It has only been within the last few years that they have been making their own barrels and they are not cast barrels either, not traditional castings or the newer MIM castings. Ruger only uses the new MIM castings in their parts that are “other than barrels”. I know of no company, S&W or any other company that uses “cast barrels” not traditional castings or the newer MIM castings.

        Again show me references to prove S&W is using any type of castings to make barrels.

      • petru Sova January 18, 2014, 9:25 pm

        To my knowledge no one in the industry makes a cast barrel, not in a traditional casting or especially in an MIM casting. Ruger tried this experimentally decades ago and the cast barrels blew up.

    • 44.Special January 20, 2014, 7:39 am

      Dear Mr. P. Sova,
      Back to the grip safety; if you will notice the placement of the grip safety on the R51 it is not placed to be actuated by the palm of your hand, or even by the heel of your thumb. The R51′s safety is designed to be actuated by the web between the thumb and the forefinger (trigger finger). Moving the grip, even slightly, to holster the pistol will break contact between the web and the saety thus safing the pistol.

      I started shooting at age 7. By the age of 10 I had started target shooting and keeping a log of all the ammunition fired, results and notes, etc. Soon after that I started keeping a log of all rounds fired, the firearm, calibre, results, etc. I also logged rounds fired during my military service, where and when possible, from machine guns, submachine guns, automatic rifles, and pistols. I must admit that some of the numbers were estimates (kept them conservative), such as 7.5 boxes 7.62, M-60, Hill 387. That would be 1,500 rounds in 1hour 10 minutes. In civilian life I added black powder weapons and rounds to the count (back to exact numbers and more detail). I am now well into retirement and still actively shooting. The reason for this paragraph? The count is now well over I million rounds fired. During this protracted record keeping I have had 26 misfires, 4 cook-offs, and no, 0, nada accidental fires. Most of the misfires were with rounds older than me, which is pretty damned old.

      The point: You may know your firearm. You may handle your firearm lot. But firearm safety comes down to one thing; a commitment to the thoughtful, conscious, continuous and consistent safe handling of fire arms. I may have a firearm completely disassembled in front of me, but it is still loaded. Seems ridiculous you think? Then find another shooting partner my friend.

      The one thing that bothers me about the R51 is that awful big rivet or screw that protrudes of of the fron of the lower end of the triggerguard bow. That coud have been counter-sunk and finished off smoothly whether rivet or screw. Speaking of which the triggerguard bow is not the nicest looking thing either, Is it supposed to be an aiming laser or target light? Enough said. None of the preceding would be enough to discourage me from purchasing the R51. I like the size and functionality for a 9mm Para. I also think that it is economically priced for all that you get with such a firearm.

      Regards to all,

      44.Special

  • LAMan January 16, 2014, 9:45 pm

    I have an original Remington 51 in .380 and love it. As a retro guy by nature, I personally could do without the curves & racy trigger on the new one, but applaud Remington for bringing back a modern version of the Pedersen locking system. The old 51 is easier to rack and easier to shoot than the blowback 1910/1922/1955 Brownings, hands down. It’s a highly ergonomic, point & pull defense pistol. To each his own, but I think this is a 0-15 yard carry gun, and its performance in delivering 2-inch groups at 25 or 50 yards is irrelevant to me.

    Remington considered the original version perfectly safe to carry with grip safety only, and employed a manual safety for those who wanted the reassurance of one. I find it impossible to believe that Remington would field an unsafe design in today’s litigious environment. FWIW, I’ve recently been carrying my Rem 51 cocked, off safety, chamber empty, and the grip safety hasn’t let me down. My LGS is picking up a copy for me ASAP.

    If it’s half the gun its predecessor was & is, I’ll be thrilled, and initial indications are that it’s definitely a keeper.

    • Mr. Dusty January 17, 2014, 1:24 am

      Agreed. I’m surprised at how many ignorant and downright unfriendly responses he got for voicing his opinion though. I’m a huge fan of the Remington 51 and hope the new one is, as you say, at least half the gun the original was…but the trigger does look a touch cheap and the manual safety would bode well with many consumers. Seeing an Administrator (?) even comment in MIM injected parts was beyond me…I don’t know who’s paying these guys to endorse X or Y product but Petra isn’t the only person I’ve met who doesn’t trust/particularly like MIM.

      I personally find it a touch suspicious when I go to look into a new product and see any comments regarding dislike or different opinions met with hostility. It’s a sign that -somebody- is paying far more for PR than the actual design. For those that don’t believe me; oh well…I’ve been paid for FALSE reviews and would be still doing so if I hadn’t had a moral quandary with such deceit. They’re all over the net and, often, written by the same person under multiple pseudonyms.

      • cap n lou January 18, 2014, 8:04 pm

        Mr dusty, I can only speak for myself and gun owners i know. We are sick and tired of being told whats safe and whats not safe. This handgun is designed to be drawn and fired in a life and death situation. Most of us luckily will never be in that situation, but if that day ever comes, it will close up, very fast,and very violent. To be prepared that, the weapon must be kept simple. ie K.I.S.S. Any safety that slows that down could get you killed. I think this firearm falls into that class. Most of us have been waiting for glock to come out with a single stack 9mm, but i think glock makes what glock wants to make, not what we want made. Big green filled this void at the perfect time. If this handgun turns out to be a winner, i will be more than happy to put my money in remingtons pocket. You also state you have been paid for giving FALSE reviews. Thats something i would be ashamed of. These weapons might someday be used to save our LOVED ones ! Your name should be mr untrusty. By the way i dont get paid for what i say and i have no interest in how well it does. Have you ever thought about a job in politics ?

  • Davef January 16, 2014, 9:59 pm

    Have owned a Model 51, in 380 for 40 years, it is awesome and accurate. if the new one is as good, I’ll get one when I wear out the old one.

  • Fenris January 16, 2014, 10:37 pm

    My EDCC is a Sig P226.

    It is double action but has no external safety. When holstering my thumb rides the hammer and never even touches the back of the grip. When holstering a R51, have your thumb ride the back of the slide and don’t even touch the back of the grip.

    When drawing the gun keep your bugger hook off the bang switch until the sights are on target. Also when drawing the gun is moving away from the direction that the trigger moves so the likelihood of pulling that trigger is de minimis.

    Would I carry if the hammer were exposed? Absolutely. I wish it were. As I said previously, I like to ride the hammer as an extra level of safety, but with the R51 I would simply avoid squeezing the grip. Remember the grip has to be SQUEEZED, not simply touched.

    I have children. I do NOT leave any guns out ever. ALL guns are either on me or locked up. If you are relying on a 1911 manual safety or a long DA trigger pull to protect your children from and AD due to you leaving firearms unsecured, then you are extremely negligent, and borderline retarded.

    However, your writing and obsessive posting on this topic makes it sound more like you work for a competitor. Kimber? Probably not. Price point is too high, so not the same market. Kahr? Keltec? Smith and Wesson? Sig Sauer? Nope, most of their guns don’t have safeties either. So I’m guessing the most likely ones would Ruger or probably Hi-Point. Did I get it right? Do you work for Hi-Point?

    • cap n lou January 18, 2014, 8:15 pm

      Working for hi point must be a high paying job, please mail me a application.

  • Don M January 17, 2014, 12:22 am

    Not a real 51 grip isn’t even the same which is the trademark of the 51. Remington
    misses the handgun boat again. Truly a classic gun for the low
    information crowd.

    How about a remake of the Model 52 in 45 acp. They have one in their
    museum. That would be a real gun worth buying. With Peterson dead
    and gone need to sick with rifles like always.

  • TRob ARob January 17, 2014, 12:31 am

    I am ALL in. It looks so good it’s got me saying “My, my, my my my.my, you sure look good tonite. After all this time.”

  • Scott January 17, 2014, 1:26 am

    Can’t wait to get one in my hands. I like the history of the gun like the 1911 has also. I like the looks with the smooth radius edges. I would compare it to the retro cars we’re seeing on the market today. Older design, updated with more powerful calibers. Awesome.

  • kenbay2015 January 17, 2014, 1:28 am

    It’s definitely just my style and it’s a pretty gun IMO. I thought it was another PPK wanna-be at first glance. It has an early 1900′s look to it and looks like it will be great for CC. Let’s hope it doesn’t have any functional problems and quirks like so many new guns have.

  • Rocky Mountain nut January 17, 2014, 8:08 am

    Wow that’s hideous

  • HAZMAN January 17, 2014, 8:33 am

    I want one ! … I’ll be the safety

  • chris January 17, 2014, 2:02 pm

    as far as I can see safety is not the issue. with all the accidental shootings in the U.S. with people cleaning loaded weapons and shooting their kids. why don’t you practice real gun safety. it only takes a second to unholster and get a round into the chamber. Just carry the damn sidearm with a loaded clip and nothing in the chamber. take the questionable safety out of the equation and be smart if your unsure of what might be happen. SAFETY FIRST!!!!!!

    • cap n lou January 22, 2014, 9:19 pm

      If you dont know enough to call a magazine a MAGAZINE that would probably would be good advice for you ! Chris, magazine or mag not clip. magazine or mag not clip, magazine or mag not clip unless of course you work for msnbc then your good.

  • Smuck Smith January 17, 2014, 3:07 pm

    When this gun first came out the MSRP was $389. Now it’s $420. Also the weight was supposedly 20 oz, now it’s 22 oz. The way this is going when the gun finally ships it will be $500 and weigh 25 oz.

  • Xac January 17, 2014, 3:55 pm

    I don’t have extensive knowledge of how this safety system works, but it sounds like it’s a short single action only trigger (like the 1911), but lacks the manual safety of the 1911. I would never trust carrying a condition 0 1911 (manual safety off, round in the chamber, cocked), so either there is more to this safety system than is apparent so far, or it really does seem like an unsafe carry gun. To disagree with the fact that this is an unsafe carry gun, you’d also have to say that carrying a 1911 in condition 0 is safe, since it’s essentially the same thing (unless I’m missing additional safety features on this gun).

  • John January 18, 2014, 12:14 pm

    Sounds like a fine piece for Condition 3 carry. I’m with petru above; Condition 0 is just not safe for ordinary carry.

  • John January 18, 2014, 12:14 pm

    Sounds like a fine piece for Condition 3 carry. I’m with petru and Zac above; Condition 0 is just not safe for ordinary carry.

  • Boomer January 18, 2014, 5:40 pm

    Personally; I don’t like manual safeties on conceal carry pistols. Too easy to miss it or forget it’s engaged. The grip safety is more than adequate for this pistol for me. For those uncomfortable with the design; there are plenty of other fine firearms to look at with manual safeties. I recommend checking out the CZ and its variants. Many fine and reliable picks in that bunch.

    Regardless of how popular this firearm will be; it will be an instant collector piece just by the design of the moving parts compared to how most semi-auto pistols are made today.

    I look forward to reading the specs; particularly the thickness at the thickest part which looks like it might be the slide. If it’s thin enough; most people can find a way to conceal it without printing.

  • cap n lou January 18, 2014, 6:47 pm

    Petru, Thats whats so great about America, we have so much to choose from. Its great with all the new handguns out right now. Remington filled a void that glock could or would not fill. ie glock 42.If the 42 would have been a 9mm it would have been a perfect cc weapon but its not. If you jam a glock into the wrong holster and it catches on the trigger guess what it will go off. Thats not the guns fault its your fault. If the rem 51 is somethng you dont want to buy or carry dont buy it. If you wont a safe handgun buy a ruger lc9. Talk about safeties, manual thumb safety only on the left side, magazine safety, and a long trigger which is also a safety. If thats not safe enough for you maybe you could carry yours without ammo in it, or better yet dont carry a handgun at all. I dont think that will keep you safer, but you can try it.

  • Dom January 19, 2014, 2:22 pm

    The man gave his opinion and thoughts. I prefer a manual safety myself.

    • cap n lou January 20, 2014, 8:23 pm

      Not quite, first he started off by calling us all jetho bodines, then he was giving us a history lesson about firearms. He is talking down to us, but maybe he works for glock and they are on the defense about their latest and not so greatest powerhouse,ie glock42. Who knows, but he is trying to tell us what we should buy. some of us have been around firearms all our lives and we know what we like. We dont need a lecture from a arm chair commando.

  • hxiao87 January 20, 2014, 2:52 am

    Carrying in Condition 0 is perfectly safe if you know what you’re doing. One, you need to keep your finger away from the trigger until you are ready to fire, and you need to practice doing so until it’s completely subconscious. I began shooting in the late 1990s, so this is second nature to me, but those who grew up earlier and/or started with DA revolvers may have problems. Two, you need a holster appropriate for your gun. There’s no sense in spending $300+ on a gun, $1000+ in range time and ammo while cheaping out on the holster. Three, you need to wear well-fitting clothes to minimize the likelihood of trigger snags. I use IWB holsters and wear slim fit shirts and my waist size hasn’t changed in over ten years, so that’s not a problem for me, but for those who are heftier and prefer looser, baggier shirts and trousers, trigger snag would be a bigger issue.

    • Mr Broomhandle February 1, 2014, 7:34 pm

      Your economic analogy is ‘spot on’

  • ECILOP January 20, 2014, 9:45 am

    An opinion is just that, an opinion. Mechanically speaking, Mr. Sova, if you have long trigger travel with the likes of a 5 lbs trigger pull at the end – it would have to be one heck of a snag for the gun to fire. And if you snag that badly, you are not practicing correctly. Again, just an opinion. I think it’s a great looking gun, LOVE the trigger, and the fact that it’s not a “Hi-point gangbanger special” tells me of a possible decent quality of the weapon.

    However, even Sig has made some bad guns, so unless you fire the R51 and test it several times – you won’t know if it’s a good weapon or not. And even if you do, it’s just may not be the nod for you. No need to get all “hot and bothered” by a comment.

    Off-duty, I carry a Kimber Ultra Carry II and a Glock 30 intermittently, AND, practice regularly with both styles of guns. If Mr. Sova is uncomfortable with a grip-safety gun, G-d bless him.

    Be safe !

    • Mr Broomhandle February 1, 2014, 5:30 pm

      I got a Kimber Ultra 9mm – best ‘point and shoot’ around, and super dependable

  • R51pistol January 27, 2014, 3:18 pm

    I have made up my mind that I really do want one of these but I will reserve final judgement until I handle one of them and try the trigger. I had heard that kahr pistols were good. I thought they were a bit expensive but decided to handle one of them at the local gun store. EGADS, the things have the worst trigger I ever tried. I would not own one if I found it laying on the ground, I would step over it and keep on walking. Want to experience a truly sh|t trigger? Pick up a kahr pistol and dry fire it, you will puke. I have a cheap but good little 9mm, a kaltec PF9. The trigger is soo much better then the kahr. With a kahr you pull and pull and pull and the trigger does not break (fire) until it travels all the way back and has the be forcibly squeezed at the end of what seems like 10 miles of trigger pull, my finger squished up at the end of this travel and before the trigger broke I had to increase the pressure on my fat finger so it finally broke (fired). This is an example of a gun that is sold widely and had a good rep so when I picked it up I was expecting goodness and got crap. How do they actually sell these with this trigger? So, back to the R-51. I will pass judgment after I hold one and dry fire it. If it is good, I’ll buy it on the spot, what I will not do, is buy one mail order.

    • Mr Broomhandle February 1, 2014, 5:36 pm

      I got an LC9 and the problem with the long pull is the trigger has to reset between shots. The trigger return is spongy, and weak, and in a stressful situation you may not get the reset.

  • Mr Broomhandle February 1, 2014, 5:25 pm

    Petru Sova ….. You are 100% correct. I like the R51, but only an idiot would have a cocked single action gun in their pocket, or a body holster, without a good manual safety. Even a 1911 is ‘Iffy’ without a outside holster. Do people believe that at Ft Knox you walk into mess hall, or barracks, etc with a Cocked & Locked 1911? Short of charging up San Juan hill, most times that 1911 is in ‘Condition-3′.

    A Browning HP has a stiff safety, and a magazine safety. Now lets talk ‘Fact from Fiction’. The gun-happy Israelis will only carry Condition-3. As to “Cops and Glocks”, that’s a price issue, and a dummy gun (pull and shoot). My two carry guns are a Seecamp, and a Sig 232 (pocket guns), my car gun is a Browning HP in condition-3, and my house gun is a coach double barrel.

    Your opponents here need to learn ‘Situational Awareness’. Every gun has a risk-reward ratio, getting the gun out (without shooting yourself), is a learned process. Now reholstering a gun is even more dangerous.

  • Doubletap52 February 1, 2014, 10:44 pm

    Interesting posts. I will reserve my comments, criticisms, and possible praise until I have first hand experience of at least 500 rounds with the R51 I pre-ordered today. I promise a thorough but unbiased, experience-based, and un-emotional report on this firearm. Semper Fi

  • Robert February 2, 2014, 3:01 pm

    I just finished a very good review of this weapon in the March 2014 issue of Guns & Ammo. The reviewer is a former law enforcement professional who stated his many concerns and doubts prior to the actual handling and firing (more than 1500 rounds through several different samples) of this weapon. Following his handling and firing, he was extremely happy with the R51. In the review, he states that the weapon has “two safeties: a hammer block and a low profile grip safety located on the backstrap”. I was impressed with the article and will be checking this pistol out very carefully. Seems like it could be a winner. Semper Fi all!!

  • buzz039 February 3, 2014, 4:19 pm

    @ petru Sova
    when you wake up in the middle of the night looking at the muzzle of gun and someone shouting at you, i hope while fumbling around for your weapon you will remember to click off the safety and cock the hammer but i doubt you can. you refer to the safety on the 1911, remember that safety is for carrying the 1911 with a round chambered and the hammer back.

  • Robert February 4, 2014, 12:41 pm

    I very much want to get the R-51 but suspect that it will be impossible to find for many months. We’ve all read pretty much everything there is to know about this pistol, so we either plan to buy or we don’t. I like what I’ve read and seen (youtube), and the price is further enticement. As with any firearm, awareness must be absolute, so pulling the R-51 shouldn’t be a problem despite having “only” a grip safety.

  • Brian374 February 6, 2014, 3:54 pm

    Remington has been making pistol(s) longer than anyone alive posting on this website. It took two years to make a modern version of the model 51 which is now called the R51. With all that testing, Remington wants to get this pistol right the first time with no mistakes. The R51 looks alot like my FEG 380. I think I will purchase a R51, but will wait until this summer when the demand dies down and the after market catches up with grip(s), kydex holsters etc. May be I missed it, but how many clips will the R51 come with? I just bought a new XDM 9mm. My wife told me…no more guns…lol. By this summer she’ll give in :)

  • 1919 Rem Model 51 February 8, 2014, 5:20 am

    I own a pristine Model 51 that I fired for the first time in 1956 when I was 4 years old. Built in late 1919, this .380 Cal has never failed to feed, fire, or eject any case. I have never experienced a mishap in handling this pistol because it is an extension of my right hand. And that is part of my mind’s control, guided by common sense and treating it (and all guns) as if in Condition “0″ and/or “ready to fire”. I carry in Condition “3″ and rack the slide upon gaining target acquisition. That action is a habit that stems from practicing. When I re-holster it, my thumb and fingertips are all that is touching the sides only, on the grip pads, slipping smoothly into the well-fitted holster. That’s how you do it PETRU. It’s just like driving a car… you don’t think about how you are going to apply the brake with your foot each time you come to a stop. If you’ve read the literature and ads from that era, the Model 51 has the claim of being the safest pocket pistol in the world. It even states that on the box it came in. My grandfather bought it brand new in December of 1919 and paid $15.50 for it. Passed down to my dad, then on to me, we have fired a huge number of rounds through it, so much that the lands are smooth. Even with the worn out barrel, no tumble is evident, projectiles still spinning, and still shoots 2″ at 15 yds. Shot a perfect 250 on my CHL Range Proficiency exercise. This is my “carry pistol” although I have purchased a few new pistols to replace this one with. This old Model 51 is still in my pocket. The Smith & Wesson and the Sigs are still almost new in their boxes in my gun safe. I am confident however, that the new R51 will win the spot in my pocket for my #1 carry pistol. I’ve talked with Remington about this new R51 and I can’t see it not being any less than 80% as much the reliable and safe pistol as my old 51 is. I have never applied the manual safety on this 51 except when cleaning and lubricating when I just keep it exercised so that it retains its functionality. All in all, I’m not doing any name-calling here. That’s kid stuff. This style, the Pedersen action with the locking breech block within the slide, recoil spring over the stationary barrel, intricate & complicated although brilliantly designed trigger mechanism, and the effects of the delayed blowback action sure makes it a dream to shoot, even off the hip… It’s a natural pointer. But, just like anything else, some people like it where others don’t. That’s where we all differ. It’s all just a matter of personal preference, adaptability, and comfort with the product. You want a particular feature, like Petru’s manual safety lever? Buy one with Petru’s manual safety lever. Buy whatever fits YOU and don’t condemn others’ choices… especially if you haven’t even touched one. Geez! That wore me out just to type this. A day at the range is much easier. Be safe guys. We’re all in this world of guns together and none of us like to see accidents.

  • Sigman Cox Haynie February 8, 2014, 5:13 pm

    Of the many surprises of the R51 perhaps the most noteworthy is that it is made for the 9x19mm cartridge with no plans to offer it in .380 ACP or .32 ACP, as this is written. In addition, while the only slightly larger R51 also uses a fixed barrel, inside single action hammer and a separate breechblock like the original Model 51, it has been simplified and improved in a number of ways.

    With its somewhat long trigger take-up, the R51 has no manual safety, but retains the grip safety, which when depressed in the hand, allows the gun to be fired. A conventional slide stop has been added on the left side of the frame in addition to a protected ambidextrous magazine release, and each grip panel is attached with screws. What’s more, even though it is a tiny bit bigger than its 21 oz. predecessor, the R51 weighs only one ounce more, thanks to its 7075/T6 alloy frame.

    I copied this from a review. Looks like it’s single action with a long pull and a light break.

  • Norniron March 31, 2014, 10:34 am

    Petru Sova makes a legitimate point. I don’t think it means he/she doesn’t understand the need to have a weapon ready in the CCW world. I can totally see the scenarios he points out. Your adrenaline is pumping…somebody is approaching, and you reach into your pocket, grab the handle, and put your finger on the trigger as you pull. BOOM! It goes off in your pants or jacket pocket. It happens, even to very experienced and trained shooters, police officers, etc. I would venture to guess that most people out there with CCW permits don’t have as much training as a police officer. I’ve seen experienced guys at the range holding guns with their finger on the trigger that have to get reminded by range staff what they are doing.

    The other thing that EVERYBODY on here needs to remember is that you better only be pulling that gun as a last resort, and have a GOOD reason to do so. Having that manual safety gives that one extra half second that it takes to deactivate it to really consider what you’re getting ready to do. Remember folks, if you shoot, and it can be argued that perhaps you could have “beat feet” instead of firing, your life could be ruined…destroyed reputation, jail time, etc.

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