What I Love & Hate About the Walther PPS M2

The Walther PPS M2 fits into the category known as “slim nines,” meaning it is a small, thin, easily concealed 9mm pistol. Its German roots are readily apparent in its design and manufacture. The gun has a 3.1-inch barrel and measures 6.3 inches long and 1 inch wide. With the flush six-round magazine, it measures 4.4 inches high. With the seven-round magazine, the height increases just barely to 4.9 inches. The flush-fit magazine is easier to hide, and the extended magazine is better for overall purchase. Overall weight is 21.1 ounces. Sounds familiar, right? Many slim nines have similar specs.

***Shop for a Walther PPS M2 on GunsAmerica. Some are Listed under $400!***

The Walther outshines other slim nines due to its fantastic reliability and superb accuracy. No matter what ammunition I load up, it feeds, fires and ejects every time. Getting rounds on target is easy and intuitive. A few key attributes that I love contribute to its stellar performance both on the range and in a holster. Just one part of the design leaves a bit to be desired.

Hate: Grip Texture

 

Let’s start with my primary gripe: the grip. Walther’s “non-slip, cross-directional grip surface” should be far rougher to help me better lock my hand around the stocks. As is, it doesn’t provide as much purchase as I like. Note, however, that my drawing and shooting has never suffered due to the grip. I have never felt the gun to be out of my total control when shooting. It just could be better. I know; it is so subjective. So, how do I manage a decent grip? I credit the ergonomics of the stocks. The finger grooves are just right, the palm swells are excellent, and the grip angle is a perfect match for the rest of the gun. Another redeeming factor is the fact that the grip surface never catches on cover garments and feels fine against your skin when carried inside the waistband.

Love: Sights

They’re not night sights. They’re wonderful, big, bright, white dots. They are easy to see and easy to align, and they are more visible in low-light conditions than other white three-dot sights. In low light situations, with a tactical flashlight in my weak hand and the PPS M2 in my right hand, lighting up a target provides enough light to see the sights on the gun. The sights are made of metal and have never snagged on anything.

Love: Thin and Balanced

 

You don’t think about how thin or balanced the PPS M2 is while holding it, firing it and changing the magazines. You just enjoy the experience and marvel at how wonderful it is to shoot. While holding a thin, lightweight gun can be marked by drama or frustration due to, among other things, snappy muzzle flip, such is not the case with the PPS M2. Despite its thinness, there is plenty of space available for both hands. It is not slide-heavy like some guns are, nor is it clunky or awkward. No matter which magazine you are using, and no matter how many rounds are in it, the PPS M2 always feels balanced. Its balanced feel is due the well-designed grip ergonomics described earlier and comes in spite of the non-slip grip texture. Also, at only an inch wide, the physics work in favor of balance and maneuverability.

Love: Fit and Finish

Some slim nines feel plasticky and cheap. In guns like that, the slide may be machined a bit thin, or the frame may be molded from a harder, brittler plastic. Moreover, the internal mechanisms may lack precision or polishing. Slides may go into battery with harsher metallic sounds instead of a symphony of engineering. (You know what I’m talking about.) Magazines and their releases may function with a bit more effort needed than you thought, or they may result in a sound or feel that just does not instill confidence. None of those things are true with the Walther PPS M2. Every bit of the gun feels robust, functions with precision and makes all the right sounds.

Conclusion

In other places, I have described some really excellent guns as the right kind of boring. Pick them up, load them up, fire the rounds downrange, reload and repeat. Everything works every time. That’s the Walther PPS M2. It is also the right kind of boring when it comes to carrying it concealed. It will do great IWB at 1 o’clock or 4 o’clock, OWB at 5 o’clock or in a pocket. When you show the gun to your buddies at the range, they’ll say, “Nice gun,” and then be on to the next gun.

***Shop for a Walther PPS M2 on GunsAmerica. Some are Listed under $400!***

If you’re looking for a slim nine as a concealed carry gun, don’t hesitate to consider the Walther PPS M2 just because of what I said about the grip. I still carry it regularly as is, and yet there are a few ways to mitigate my concerns. One is to add a rubber sleeve or stick-on grip panels (such as those created by Talon Grips). The other is to get a custom stippling job on the stocks or do the job yourself (at your own risk).

Discover how you can join more than 200,000 responsibly armed Americans who already rely on the USCCA to protect their families, futures and freedoms: USCCA.com/gunsamerica.

About the author: Mark Kakkuri is a nationally published freelance writer who covers guns and gear, 2nd Amendment issues and the outdoors. His writing and photography have appeared in many firearms-related publications, including the USCCA’s Concealed Carry Magazine. You can follow him on Twitter @markkakkuri.

{ 6 comments… add one }
  • Pocketgunner August 10, 2018, 1:26 pm

    Nothing here. Yet another long OAL for carry. 6.1″. And weight of over 20 oz. Not impressed. Too big when there are high quality smaller 9mm’s out there. Want a super mild, I mean really mild shooting 9mm with extremely little muzzle flip, try the Nano. A very under estimated firearm, and built like a tank. OAL is only 5.6 and and lighter weight as well.

  • Stan August 3, 2018, 7:04 pm

    Yeah, I think I’ll stay with my performance center Shield 9mm-.95 inches thick, 6 inches long, 10 round total capacity with an internal mod kit to the 8 round mag bringing it to 9 rounds with NO increase in length, great sights, awesome texture and grip feel in the hand, shoots a ragged hole group off a bag at seven yards and a great trigger for a concealed carry self defense pistol.
    With over a thousand rounds through it with ZERO FAILURES even when brand new, I’m pretty happy with it and OH it’s made in AMERICA.

  • Texf6 August 3, 2018, 9:09 am

    Likewise I enjoy this firearm. Talon grips as stated, ride on most all of my polymer frames. They just work at a reasonable price point too. This little kitten rides in my pocket while wearing shorts etc. very discreetly when going to the grocery store or big box building stores at a moments notice for a quick errand.

    Texf6

  • Joe Average August 3, 2018, 7:04 am

    Wouldn’t trade it for my first gen PPS with the paddle.
    I get it, but I still think the paddle is better than the button.

    • DaveGinOly August 3, 2018, 10:01 pm

      Love mine too. Did make a minor enhancement to the grips. In the channels between the raised sections of the grip, I laid in very thin strips of skateboard-type tape. (I cut the strips with a rotary paper cutter, so I was able to get very thin strips with nice parallel sides.) They make a decent grip great, IMHO.

      As for the mag release, I have a technique (you may do something similar). When my support hand comes off to go for the spare mag, my thumb and forefinger pinch together as they come to the trigger guard, toggling the mag release as they go by.

  • Jim Hovater July 31, 2018, 9:39 pm

    I also love my PPS M2. So much so that I sold my XDs 3.3. My only gripe is that the slide stop and magazine release spring, sear pin, and mags, are RUST MAGNETS. Why these parts aren’t Tenifer coated is beyond me.

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