Shoot Suppressed: CZ P-10 F Suppressor-Ready Handgun Reviewed

There is nothing that is much more fun than shooting a quality, suppressed pistol.

CZ’s P-10 lineup was first announced in 2017. Some people were lucky enough to get their hands on them around 2018, but I’ve waited all this time to test a P-10 F Suppressor-Ready in 9mm Luger, and boy… was it worth it. For those of you who are not familiar with the P-10 series, they are polymer-framed, striker-fired handguns that are offered in subcompact, compact, semicompact, full, optics ready and suppressor-ready versions. Being what they are, many people are tempted to compare them to other popular handguns on the market, but I won’t be doing that because they are a different creature altogether.

About The CZ P-10 F SR

Why is the CZ different? We’ll start at the grip and work our way up. All of the P-10s have CZ’s grip angle, high grip position, undercut trigger guard, deep beavertail, mild palm swell, and interchangeable backstraps. All of these features make the P-10 F SR extremely comfortable to hold and intuitive to point. The high grip position and extra mass of being a full-size handgun made this pistol very flat-shooting. The texture that is on the grip of the P-10 F SR is aggressive, creating a slip-free grip. At first, I thought it was a bit too over-aggressive, but with time, the texturing has grown on me to the point that I am now quite fond of how it feels in the hand.

As shown by the texturing of my palm, the texture on the P-10 F SR is extremely aggressive. Whether or not you prefer this is up to you to decide. Over time, it grew on me.

The P-10 F SR comes with 3 different backstraps that can be interchanged simply by removing a single pin. I tested all of them for fit and found that the mid-sized backstrap felt the best in my hand. Honestly, this is no surprise since I wear a size M glove as an EMT. This leaves me no doubt that the vast majority of people can achieve a custom-fit feeling through simply swapping the backstrap.

I have the medium sized backstrap installed. To the right of the grip, you can see the small and large backstrap for size reference.

The final details on the frame that I want to point out are small ones but improve the end-user’s experience nonetheless. The magazine release is interchangeable to be operated as either a lefty or righty. The slide lock sits in a recessed area, making it easy to access. The slide release is ambidextrous and over-sized, making it easy to operate. And finally, the P-10 F SR features a Picatinny rail section upfront, allowing you to attach any lights, lasers, or other accessories.

Here, you can see the recess around the slide lock, the textured magazine release, and the trigger safety of the P-10 F SR.

On to the upper half: The slide on the P-10 F SR has serrations located on the front as well as the rear, providing a positive grip no matter how you choose to rack the slide. The 3-dot, high tritium night-sights are tall enough that they rise above my 1.5″ diameter suppressor and they glow an intense green in the dark. And, of course, the muzzle is threaded 1/2×28 TPI for attaching suppressors.

The slide serrations are located at both the front and rear of the slide. Also, notice the 1/2×28 TPI threaded barrel.

The Trigger

This is a category that deserves its own special attention. My first impression of the CZ P-10 F SR’s trigger was that it was excellent. It feels great because of multiple aspects: the slightly swept trigger shoe with radiused edges, the short trigger pull, and crisp & light break. Oh, and of course, the reset is just as crisp and short. From the first touch, I was impressed. This could be the best feeling factory striker-fired trigger that I’ve yet put my hands on.

Before I took the gun out to the range, I put my Wheeler Trigger Pull Gauge on the gun and got an average of 4.3 pounds. This is just lower than the 4.5 – 5 lb trigger pull that is advertised on CZ’s website. Yes, not the lightest trigger on earth, but you’ve got to test one for yourself to see why I praise it so highly.

Taking Shots

While I’ve had CZ’s P-10 F Suppressor-Ready, I have taken it on multiple, multiple range trips. When shooting the gun, I found that my grip forms naturally on the pistol as if it were designed for my hands. It points intuitively, with the sights lining up perfectly just by raising the gun up. The sights on the P-10 F SR are just tall enough for me to easily use them in conjunction with my 1.5″ diameter suppressor. If I had a larger can, it would cover the sights though.

Looking down the sights with a 1.5″ diameter suppressor attached leaves just enough room to see the target.

When it came to putting rounds on target, I shot the P-10 F SR better than most other handguns that have been in my hands. I attribute this to the gun’s comfortable fit and low recoil impulse. At the end of the day, it left me smiling with a pile of brass on the ground after flawlessly eating everything and anything that I fed it.

Between me and my range hand, we put a ton of rounds through the P-10 F SR.

For my testing, I used a variety of ammo that ranged in weight from 108 grains all the way up to 147 grains. Included in my testing were: Norma 108 Grain MHP, Federal American Eagle 115 grain, Norma Hexagon 124 grain, Blazer Brass 124 grain.

Specifications for CZ P-10 F Suppressor-Ready

  • 9mm Luger
  • 21 + 1 magazine capacity
  • fiber-reinforced polymer frame
  • striker-fired
  • high tritium three-dot sights
  • 5.11″ cold hammer-forged barrel
  • Width: 1.26″
  • weight: 30 oz
  • 8.6″ overall length
  • safety: firing pin block safety and trigger safety
  • $577.00 MSRP
Even though we have very differently sized hands, me and the wife both found the P-10 F SR to be a comfortable, flat shooter.

Final Thoughts

“Who is this gun made for?” is a question that comes to mind when thinking about the P-10 series from CZ. “Everyone” is the answer that I’ve arrived at. Like many other gun owners, I have several different makes of striker-fired handguns but I’ll be adding this CZ P-10 F SR to the list. It became my favorite very quickly just from fitment in my hand alone. Add in a lot of reliability, large mag capacity, low recoil impulse, and a great trigger and I believe that you’ve got yourself a winner.

Overall, I think that the P-10 F Suppressor-Ready may just be the best full-sized handgun that a consumer can purchase for under $600. Let me know what you think about this in the comments below.

This is how the CZ P-10 F SR comes in the box when you purchase it.

Learn More about CZ’s P-10 F Suppressor-Ready pistol by clicking HERE!

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More Pictures:

A look inside of the CZ P-10 F SR.

About the author: Riley Baxter is an avid and experienced hunter, shooter, outdoorsman, and he’s worked in the backcountry guiding for an outfitter. He also get’s a lot of enjoyment out of building or customizing his firearms and equipment. Check out Riley’s Instagram @Shooter300

{ 7 comments… add one }
  • Lance August 9, 2020, 12:48 pm

    Let’s say that you have a laser sight on you hand gun at what distance do you sight it in 10yds,25yds etc. thanks for your input.

  • Gary Edwards August 7, 2020, 11:20 am

    The CZ is certainly a nice pistol. However, I’d encourage anyone considering such to first check out the Walther PPQ Q4 TAC. This is, for me, the ideal size pistol. It too has 3 backstraps and great stippling allowing for quick and natural pointing. However, it also comes with THREE mags (one 15 rnd and two 17 rnd +1), a threaded barrel, an extra spring for suppressor use, AND an optics ready slide which would cost big bucks to have machined otherwise. The Walther also has the reputation for having THE trigger others are compared to, so perhaps the reviewer has not yet tried one? It also has a very large ambi slide release lever (as opposed to a small button) as well as an ambi mag drop button ridge to prevent accidental releases along with a stupidly easy takedown. When it came time to buy, it was down to these two companies and I went with the Walther for the above reasons as well as a transferable lifetime warranty. (CZ is only 5 years.) Yes, the CZ holds 3 more rounds, but how many over 18 do you really need?? and it’s also almost 4 oz. heavier. So like most things in life, “the devil is in the details” and it’s here the Walther seems to walk away from the others.

  • Daryl Poe August 4, 2020, 2:19 pm

    I own a CZ Rami 2075P and a 75 Compact. My current favorite trigger is in the very affordable Canik TP9 SFX.

  • DCW August 3, 2020, 11:41 pm

    Ignorance is bliss! There are many suppressors available, and as many firearms on which to mount them. Having a suppressor will put your name on lists you do not want to be on. It’s not worth the sacrifice of privacy in this country to have such a device. I wanted one because of my tinnitus until I was told from a military source that I would be identified on lists I don’t want to be on. I don’t have clearance to know what these lists are, but whenever I find articles and reviews about suppressors, I have to chime in. I think people should be informed of the consequence of their choice to own one. Food for thought.

    • Camulus August 7, 2020, 1:28 pm

      If you’ve purchased a firearm after 1986 you’re already on a list (the dealer’s bound book) the ATF archives.

  • don August 3, 2020, 2:30 pm

    do you have a suppressor for ,45

  • Kris Bernstein August 3, 2020, 8:07 am

    I love my matching pair of CZ P10C’s. Lots of “go fast” goodies from Cajin Gun Works.
    Rediculously accurate and the best straight-out-of-the-box trigger in the known universe.
    For duty, plinking IDPA/USPSA competition, or night stand work…simply the best….

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