Monday Gun Day Giveaway: Springfield Armory M1A National Match


Check out the specs: http://www.springfield-armory.com/products/m1a-national-match/

Buy one on GunsAmerica: /Search.aspx?T=m1a%20national%20match

Enter the contest: http://duel.springfield-armory.com/

Springfield Armory is holding its Duel–the annual festival of all-things-Springfield–and this year’s contest has more prizes than you can imagine, including some great Springfield Armory guns. This week’s Monday Gun Day giveaway is this M1A National Match. In the market for new .308? Why not enter to win? The contest is open all month for various prizes, but the National Match entries must come in on September 7th.

The National Match M1A has the traditional look of the Standard model, but offers more out-of-the-box potential.

The National Match M1A has the traditional look of the Standard model, but offers subtle improvements.

If you are looking for an all-purpose .308 that is capable of exceptional accuracy, this is the gun for you. The National Match M1A is just as useful in the gun rack behind the driver’s seat of an old Chevy pick-up as it is at the bench in competition.

The M1A National Match Specs.

The M1A National Match Specs.

What makes this worthy of the National Match title? It isn’t obvious from the outside. The rear aperture peep sight is a big step up from the standard M1A sights. It allows for a 1/2 MOA adjustments and is incredibly easy to dial in. Imagine a rear sight that you can adjust as easily as you would a scope. Directly under that rear sight, the receiver has been glass bedded into the walnut stock. Even though the gun looks like a Standard M1A, it has more stability. With the increased potential available from the peep sights, this makes repeat accuracy consistent and easy.

The barrel has also been beefed up a bit. This barrel is a medium weight barrel with a 1/11″ twist rate. The model we have in has a carbon steel barrel, but you can opt for a stainless one as well.

Dialing it in from 200 yards. As you can clearly see, I was hitting high.

Dialing it in from 200 yards. As you can clearly see, I was hitting high.

The trigger breaks clean at 5 pounds. The two-stage design is easy to control. I had no difficulty making standing shots.

I’m going to admit my bias here and say I’m a sucker for the walnut stock. I’m not highly likely to ever compete with an M1A–competition isn’t my thing–but I do like knocking over hogs. And I like the .308 for that purpose. The M1A would make an excellent rifle for porcine exterminations, especially in areas with shorter sight distances and lots of hogs. There’s nothing like opening up on a sounder of swine, knowing you have the stopping power of the .308 and speed of the M1A’s action.

The M1A family

Where does the National Match fit in the broader context of Springfield’s M1A line up? The M1A (or the M14, as it is often designated) is the rifle that replaced the Garand. Looking back at battle rifle design, I can understand why the M-14 had such a short service life. This decision was as controversial. Those opposed to the M1A design wanted a lighter rifle, and one that fired a smaller, faster round. The way we were fighting wars was evolving, and heavy battle rifles that fired high-powered rifle rounds were being relegated to designated marksmen who could make the most of their long range potential. The rest of the boots-on-the-ground ended up with rifles and carbines, like the AR-15.

The M1A didn’t fade away, though. In this respect, the M1A is like the 1911. Both platforms are finding new fans, thanks (in no small part) to the efforts of Springfield Armory. They’ve taken the guns to new places with countless updates and new designs. Each update of the M1A looks less and less like the original service rifles, but there’s always a touch of that nostalgia at the gun’s core.

I'm a huge fan of the National Match's peep sight. The depth helps cut out glare and extra light.

I’m a huge fan of the National Match’s peep sight. The depth helps cut out glare and extra light.

The M1A line-up has some unique distinctions. If you go in for the nostalgia of the original design, the Standard would be your gun. If you want a shorter barrel with more options for mounting accessories, the SOCOM would be a logical choice. The National Match bridges the gaps between the extreme competitive spirit of the Super Match rifle, and the utilitarian roots of the Standard M1A.

If you want to attach an actual scope mount to the National Match, there are numerous options. It isn’t as easy as mounting an optic on a modern AR-15. Most options include mating the scope mount with the receiver in the dovetailed cut just in front of the rear sight. I’ve put mounts on Standard M1As and I highly recommend it. For me, a scope opens up the true potential of the design.

In a world of trim .308s that are modular and easy to customize, the M1As continue to win converts. They’re rugged, stable, and highly accurate. The M1A has the ability to fight in close quarters, and the staying power and accuracy to reach out to the 300-500 yard range (or much-much farther as your skills increase). While the tiny 5.56 rounds are shedding energy that robs them of their one-shot stopping power at longer distances, the .308 hits like a sledge hammer.

And that’s why I think the M1A appeals to so many of us. Variants like the National Match are tricked out for accuracy, yet still provide the reliability that has kept the gun in service for more than 40 years. This is a great one-gun solution for anyone looking for a rifle that excels on the range and can still put food on the table. And it offers speed and durability that make it ideal in a crisis, and, if those weren’t enough, it runs on some of the most readily available ammo. What’s not to love?

Check out the specs: http://www.springfield-armory.com/products/m1a-national-match/

Buy one on GunsAmerica: /Search.aspx?T=m1a%20national%20match

Enter the contest:http://duel.springfield-armory.com/

The muzzle brake is long and surprisingly efficient. The design (coupled with the gun's weight) keeps the muzzle from climbing.

The muzzle brake is long and surprisingly efficient. The design (coupled with the gun’s weight) keeps the muzzle from climbing.

The handguard is plastic and clips onto the barrel.

The hand-guard is plastic and clips onto the barrel.

This block in front of the peep sight silde out of the doevtail to allow for a scope mount to be installed.

This block in front of the peep sight slides out of the dovetail to allow for a scope mount to be installed.

The rear sight is easy to adjust, which allows you to dial in the exact sight picture you want.

The rear sight is easy to adjust, which allows you to dial in the exact sight picture you want.

Feed ramps help guide rounds in without mauling the bullets' tips.

Feed ramps help guide rounds in without mauling the bullets’ tips.

Iron sights at 100 yards? I'll admit it isn't my strong suit. But I'm pleased with how I shot the National Match. Let's just say the rifle is far more capable than I am.

Iron sights at 100 yards? I’ll admit it isn’t my strong suit. But I’m pleased with how I shot the National Match. Let’s just say the rifle is far more capable than I am.

Check out the specs: http://www.springfield-armory.com/products/m1a-national-match/

Buy one on GunsAmerica: /Search.aspx?T=m1a%20national%20match

Enter the contest:http://duel.springfield-armory.com/

{ 8 comments… add one }
  • Michael Beitler September 8, 2015, 5:14 pm

    In 1978 I had accumulated enough points to become a Distinguished Rifle Men thru the DCM, at the time I was a member of the Michigan Rifle and Pistol Association, High Power Division. This no small feat was accomplished with a M-14 on loan from the same DCM. Of all of the rifles I have shot in competition and hunting the M-14 and my pre 64 mod. 70 are my two favorites. I own, both a 1911 and A MD-Sub compact 9mm, form Springfield Armory, and their quality is without Question. The M1A would fit in my gun cabinet without a doubt

  • Mike Bosio September 8, 2015, 3:03 pm

    I’ve been a big fan of the Springfield M1A, and have owned and shot a couple of them for almost 20 years. The M1A Loaded model is hard to beat. It already comes with match barrel and sites, and if you’d like to add the NM peep site you can easily do so. Parts are readily available from several suppliers, and if mil-spec should be inter-changeable. One of the beauties of the M14 as well as the M1 rifles are their simplicity and ease of field stripping, cleaning, and re-assembly. Once you’ve owned and gotten use to these rifles you will curse the AR15 platform for having so many small parts that must be dealt with for routine maintenance. By the way, the rifle you’ve photographed has a flash suppressor and not a muzzle brake.

  • Robert Bowermaster September 7, 2015, 8:34 pm

    I have used the M-1A, M-14 308, it is a killer and just a hit will put the enemy down and he will not get up, the 223 you could not give me one, had one for the final six months in Nam and it is a piece of poo, it was scary to put your life on the line with a 223 varmint was very scary. Love the M-14 and have allways wanted one since july 4 1967 when our position was overrun by more than 300 MVA and VC, with a gunshot wound to the chest I was out of the fight but the gooks did not see it that way, my fire team left me for dead and a friend came to my rescue while being drug away by two VC my friend shot and killed the enemy and gave me mouth to mouth several times to keep me alive, I owe him a lot, the military does not recognize him for his actions because an officer did not see it as they said to me, our machine gunner got a CMoH and the officer that wrote him up was not at the battle on the 4th of july 1967. oh well, I still admire the M-14 and would love to have one. God Bless…Bob

  • archie watkins September 7, 2015, 10:42 am

    I used a m-14 in the military and was surprised how well it shot I really liked it and this mi-a seems to a lot better with the improvments ect.. I would really like to own another one but don’t have the money it takes to get one maybe some day

  • Manuel Alen, Jr. September 7, 2015, 9:29 am

    I was issued my M-14 during Basic at Fort Benning GA November 1965
    It was my issued rifle until I turned it in to the armory in Nhatrang, Vietnam August 14-1968
    Oh, how wish I had one to call my own.

    • NealS September 7, 2015, 12:45 pm

      I remember Army training with the M-14. When I got to Nam in ’68 I was issued a Colt 1911 WWI, very loose and used. I managed to buy an M-16 for $20. Chief of Smoke (I was in the Artillery) got me a freebie M-14 which I preferred and shot most of the time as we mostly shot from our perimeter. Recently I bought the Springfield M1A National Match. I am more than pleased, adding a rail and scope. The walnut stock it came with is absolutely beautiful, a showpiece, especially now that I’ve finished it with Daly’s Floor Fin. Now I need to get another M1A to actually shoot, this one is just too pristine.

  • wally September 7, 2015, 9:25 am

    I like hope this comes back in English not cripted like last was

  • Ken September 7, 2015, 8:17 am

    Great article. I have been looking at them for a long time. The loaded is the one I want best of both worlds.
    I am all about Springfield have range officers in both 9 mm and 45.
    Thank you for the great article.

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