The Ruger American Rifle – An American Legend is Born

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The Ruger American Rifle is a whole new design from Ruger, and we think that it is the product of consumer input via the internet. Ruger has the most dedicated following of any firearm manufacturer and their user boards are always alive with suggestions. In the case of the American, we think the customers designed this rifle, and it is a slam dunk.

The Ruger American Rifle is a whole new design from Ruger, and we think that it is the product of consumer input via the internet. Ruger has the most dedicated following of any firearm manufacturer and their user boards are always alive with suggestions. In the case of the American, we think the customers designed this rifle, and it is a slam dunk.

If you look closely at this picture you will notice that the scope is mounted sideways, but Ben shot it into about an inch at 100 yards on a hurried day before SHOT Show, and it did that even with a hot barrel.

If you look closely at this picture you will notice that the scope is mounted sideways, but Ben shot it into about an inch at 100 yards on a hurried day before SHOT Show, and it did that even with a hot barrel.

The American has a free float barrel to improve accuracy and remove unwanted barrel harmonics.

The American has a free float barrel to improve accuracy and remove unwanted barrel harmonics.

There was lots of blowing sand in the desert at Media Day at the Range as you can see. If you look closely you will see the steel lugs set into the polymer stock on the Ruger American. This metal to metal fit should help with consistency and make the gun much more ammo tolerant than the Model 77, which is known to be finicky about what it likes to shoot.

There was lots of blowing sand in the desert at Media Day at the Range as you can see. If you look closely you will see the steel lugs set into the polymer stock on the Ruger American. This metal to metal fit should help with consistency and make the gun much more ammo tolerant than the Model 77, which is known to be finicky about what it likes to shoot.

This was one of a few targets we were able to quickly shoot before SHOT Show. They mostly averaged about an inch or a little more over five shots, with the first 3 well under an inch. This is about the norm from what we have seen with the new era of sub-MOA deer rifles. At 6.5 pounds, the American has a thin and light barrel meant to carry all day in the woods, not to bench rest all day at the range, and our first three shots out of a cold gun were about a half inch out of the box on the American. Legend implies something Legendary is happening. The American could be a Legendary great value in a deer rifle.

This was one of a few targets we were able to quickly shoot before SHOT Show. They mostly averaged about an inch or a little more over five shots, with the first 3 well under an inch. This is about the norm from what we have seen with the new era of sub-MOA deer rifles. At 6.5 pounds, the American has a thin and light barrel meant to carry all day in the woods, not to bench rest all day at the range, and our first three shots out of a cold gun were about a half inch out of the box on the American. Legend implies something Legendary is happening. The American could be a Legendary great value in a deer rifle.

The trigger assembly on the American is adjustable from 3 to 5 pounds, and looks a lot like the safety trigger on the Savage. But this trigger is a completely new design from Ruger, and it locks the trigger, not the sear.

The trigger assembly on the American is adjustable from 3 to 5 pounds, and looks a lot like the safety trigger on the Savage. But this trigger is a completely new design from Ruger, and it locks the trigger, not the sear.

The American doesn't use the Model 77 rings and bases. It takes standard #46 Weaver base, and it actually comes with them, though for some reason the previous reviewer of this particular rifle had left them out of the box when he returned it and we had to go buy some at Bass Pro

The American doesn't use the Model 77 rings and bases. It takes standard #46 Weaver base, and it actually comes with them, though for some reason the previous reviewer of this particular rifle had left them out of the box when he returned it and we had to go buy some at Bass Pro.

There is by the way a tang safety on the American. It isn't our favorite safety design, but it is a nice positive click and not sludgy like a lot of tang safeties.

There is by the way a tang safety on the American. It isn't our favorite safety design, but it is a nice positive click and not sludgy like a lot of tang safeties.

For now, the American is only being released in a right handed version in four calibers, but stay tuned! I expect a lefty and many more calibers will follow.

For now, the American is only being released in a right handed version in four calibers, but stay tuned! I expect a lefty and many more calibers will follow.

Ben shot this gun again at Media Day and the buzz around the shooting world is that Ruger really nailed it with this gun. We expect the American to be around for a long time.

Ben shot this gun again at Media Day and the buzz around the shooting world is that Ruger really nailed it with this gun. We expect the American to be around for a long time.

Sturm, Ruger & Co.

http://www.ruger.com/

The Ruger firearms tradition is about to experience nothing short of a slam dunk. What else would you call a six and a half pound 22″ barrel Ruger deer rifle that has a modern design polymer stock, trigger safety, four round rotary magazine, aggressive recoil pad, shoots into about an inch at 100 yards consistently, and has an MRSP of $449? Ruger calls it the American Rifle, and I call that a slam dunk.

Over and over we are hearing from manufacturers in the American firearms industry that they are bringing to market a “completely new gun.” I think it is actually because of the internet. Because where it used to be that a product succeeded or failed, and the reason for the success or failure was largely a mystery. The ubiquitous voice of the internet now can and does let you know almost immediately what consumers like about your product and what they don’t like, and this gives you the power to change your product to better meet their needs.

In the case of the new Ruger American Rifle, the voice of the consumer seems to have designed a new product for Ruger from the ground up. It is 100% different than previous Ruger rifles, and whether you are a Ruger fanatic or you are just looking for a reliable deer rifle that does what you need it to, the Ruger American looks to be a winner.

Historically the Ruger Model 77 is the flagship rifle in their line, and it is known for durability and the kind of gun from which you expect a lifetime of service. For the price, it is in line with other high end deer rifles, at an MSRP of $859, up to advanced tactical and African models in excess of $1000. The Ruger Model 77 is one of those guns that most gunsafes have at least one of, if not five or six. Ruger has one of the most committed fan bases in the entire firearms industry, and much of it is due to the success and reputation of the Model 77.

The Ruger American is being billed as “a new American legend,” and I don’t doubt that it will become that. They seem to have integrated a lot of what people like about the Model 77 with many new features, new engineering, and they have even taken a lesson from a competitors playbook to make the Ruger American a whole new gun at a crazy low price from one of the most trusted names in American firearms.

The American is 100% made in the USA, and though you never know how a new design is going to stand the test of time, the engineering changes from the Model 77 seem to be sound, and purpose driven based on what customers have been telling Ruger they want. Something as simple as using standard Weaver bases instead of proprietary rings and bases is most likely something that some customers would prefer, and that is one way that the American differs from the Model 77. As we saw with the Ruger Scout rifle recently on the GunsAmerica Blog, the standard Model 77 uses a proprietary scope mount and rings. If you want to use some of the new red dot and tactical scopes, you need a standard tactical rail, and you can do that with the Ruger American.

The action on the American also has a top strap over the top of the bolt handle. It isn’t as pretty as the open design of the 77, but it certainly doesn’t hurt the gun at all. It comes with a 4 round flush fit rotary magazine, so I’m sure that is part of the design reasoning for it. Also, the action is held into the stock by two big screw lugs, and the lugs are molded into the polymer, similar to the way an XD or Glock metal parts are molded into the polymer frame. So though the stock is polymer, there is a metal to metal weld when you bolt the action down into it. This has got to help with accuracy and consistency on the gun, and in our tests it wasn’t ammo sensitive at all, something that the Model 77 is known for.

Outwardly the American isn’t a head turner but isn’t ugly either. The forend is molded to a modern looking design, the barrel is free floated from the action, so there is no harmonic distortion from the stock touching the barrel. Before SHOT Show we were able to get an early look at a few of the products that were to be introduced as new for 2012 and the Ruger American came in a couple days before we left. In the middle of last minute details to get ready for the show, our resident US Army Sniper Ben Becker and I snuck off to the range to test this rifle, and we only had time to zero it and shoot a couple targets.

Even though the scope was hurriedly mounted sideways and refused to behave, the gun shot into about an inch with both Hornady Superformance 150gr. SST and regular Hornady Custom 165gr. GMX factory ammo. These are two very different loads in the same caliber, 30-06 Springfield, and the results were pretty much the same. When we get back we will spend more time with the rifle and other types of ammo, but so far the accuracy results with the American are as good as any other deer rifle we have tested. This is a 6.5 pound gun don’t forget. The barrel is very thin and meant for carrying in the field, not tack driving. Yet the Ruger American proved to be very accurate.

Recoil is an issue with a light 6.5 pound gun, but the thick pad on the American is very soft, and what recoil that can be absorbed from a pad is absorbed by the pad on the American. In .30-06, it is still sharp, but not punishing. Ben and I aren’t the type to force ourselves to get beat up by guns rather than be seen with extra padding protection, so we never shoot fixed action rifles on bare shoulders regardless. When we go shoot for the day with a deer rifle, it is either going to be with a Past magnum pad, or a Caldwell rest. A deer rifle is generally something you zero at the range with three to five shots then take into the field, to shoot one to a few shots, and I think the almost squishy pad on the Ruger is going to do as much as you could expect to not say ouch when you fire the gun.

If you are a Ruger fan you might already be giggling with happiness if you saw the pictures of the trigger on the American. It is consumer adjustable, from 3 pounds to 5 pounds, and it has a safety that at least looks like the one that has become very popular on Savage Rifles, and Glock and XD pistols. Ruger calls it the Marksman Adjustable Trigger, and it actually works nothing like the other safety triggers out there from how it was explained to us at range day. Ruger’s version of a trigger safety (trigger safeties have been around since the late 1800s believe it or not) locks the trigger, not the sear, so it prevents the trigger from resetting as well as the gun from firing, and this is different from the Savage, the Glock, and the XD. Sorry if that doesn’t make sense. That is how it was explained to us, and it made sense when we heard it, though I may not be explaining it correctly now. It works great though! The trigger is crisp and light, and you have an extra safety to prevent an accidental discharge due to a dropped gun or twig getting caught in your trigger guard as you push through brush.

As you can see, we got to shoot the American again at SHOT Show 2012 Media Day at the Range, and we are hearing a lot of buzz about it at the show. Everyone we have spoken to thinks Ruger could have priced this rifle at least around $699 and nobody would have flinched. At $449 MSRP and a street price much less, it will be a while I bet before supply can keep up with demand, but if you get on your dealer’s back now maybe he or she will give you one of the few they will be able to get over the next couple months. The price is nothing short of ridiculous for a made in the USA Ruger rifle. So far they have listed the available calibers as .243 Winchester, .270 Winchester, .30-06 Springfield, and .308 Winchester.

So far there is no mention of a lefty model, but don’t be surprised if both lefty and a number of other calibers are announced over the course of the year. This is the birth of a new American legend, and a slam dunk for the future of Ruger firearms.

http://www.ruger.com/

{ 47 comments }

{ 44 comments… add one }

  • David January 19, 2012, 5:17 am

    This is going on my have to have list, at the top.

  • WC January 19, 2012, 6:16 am

    Do they make it in stainless steel ?

  • Larry C. January 19, 2012, 7:34 am

    The metal to metal bedding is a craze now-a-days! On the surface, it does seem like a good idea and it is, provided that the ambient temperature changes little from the time of sighting-in to the time of actual hunting. Other manufacturers use this same technique and it is a good advertising gimmick. What is left out of the equation is the coefficient of expansion of metals and the fact that the temperature at the time of hunting can be drastically lower especially in the more northerly parts of this continent.
    The point of impact between, the “sighting-in” temperature of 70 degrees and hunting temperature of 10 degrees has been reported change as much as 8 inches at 100 yards. Personally I have seen a difference of 6 ½ inches. An action bedded into epoxy that has a coefficient of expansion that is almost non-measureable, has vertically no change of point of impact at these temperature differences.
    All really accurate guns always have a preferred load for supreme accuracy. That was and is just one of the ways a true gun aficionado gets to practice the skills of developing a “perfect” load.
    Ruger’s proprietary integral scope mounting was and is a very strong point. To step away from it is a weakness. It was one less set of screws to weaken and change impact point. If one must have separate bases, many including myself, much prefer the Leupold/Redfield rings and bases. This alone will keep me from acquiring this gun.
    For a light deer rifle, the calibers should have included the light recoil calibers of .257 Roberts, 7mm-08, 260 Remington. Although the .270 and .30-06 are excellent cartridges, they are a bit much for such a light gun which would be desired by a light person.

  • George E. Hall January 19, 2012, 7:53 am

    I would prefer a 24″ inch barrel for better acuracy!

    • GreyFox73 August 11, 2014, 11:41 am

      I understand your interest in a 24″ barrel. I took my Ruger and chopped it down to about 16 1/2. It is far easier to handle
      in a cramped deer stand. It recoils a bit more but then this rifle is so light it will recoil anyway. Most of interest is that the accuracy did not suffer at all. This piece is such an improvement over previous models it’s almost hard to believe.

      The American gun industry should all be able to do the same. Accuracy can now be achieved w/o great cost. Velocity is fine but often overdone. A deer or antelope will never complain about being killed with a bullet travelling 200 ft/s slower than max.

      Good luck!

  • KERRY January 19, 2012, 8:22 am

    I already have 3 different M77′s and like all of them. My first reaction to this one is that they are reaching to try to catch up with a Win. Mod 70 which is really hard to beat. I also have 3 of those along with about 70 other long guns. The larger caliber (30-06) and up are not for the “sometime” hunter since they are so light and a pleasure to carry, but really hurt whien you pull the trigger and the only good shot is the first one. the feather weights with synthitic stocks and stainless steel barrels are forgiving in some ways from a maintenance view point, but people who try to take adavantage of this are foolish because the real steel that rusts is inside where they only look once in awhile. I carried an M-1 Garand for awhile in the past and do not perscribe that as the pattern to follow, but something just a little lighter is a pleasure to shoot. All of the new advances in triggers and barrel bedding are always easy to accept.
    grabiron

  • Terry Goodson January 19, 2012, 9:10 am

    Look’s like a savage edge axles what every the name alone will sale the gun just hate to see Ruger drop down to this
    ugly rifle. I owe 7 model 77′s and 4 a-bolts, 3 weatherby’s 2 mark v’s and one vannguard and just got a savage edge for my son to use. I guess i’m more pissed off that i got the Savage if i would have waited a few weeks i could have got a Ruger, but still hate to see Ruger going to this ugly gun,model 77′s forever. Also glad to read that the rifle not so hard to load for,as your correct the 77′s are.
    Terry Goodson

  • GE January 19, 2012, 9:34 am

    Thanks for the updates Guns America. As for the Ruger, I own several. All good old American know how. I think this will be a great “entry level” gun for hunters on a budget. Where it will fall short with Ruger owners is the quaility fit to finish reputation that Ruger was built on. The use of Weaver bases instead of the milled bases and Ruger rings are a step back. The same with the tang safety. I replaced my older models with bolt safeties models when they came out years ago. The trigger, who knows, we’ll wait and see on this one (not a fan myself). But the one item mentioned that peaked my interest was the rotary magazine. Everyone knows this is where Ruger Rules with it’s ledgedary 10-22′s. I will need to read reviews on this one. I hope the magazine will turn out to be the savior for this rifle. Everything else I read here is backing up.

  • David January 19, 2012, 9:49 am

    I wish they would have just put a better trigger on the hawkeye,to me that was the only thing really missing. Mine shoots good , i just wish the trigger was lighter.

  • Kirby January 19, 2012, 10:25 am

    More calibers planned? I would definitely be all over it in .257 Roberts. OR even better 6.5-284.
    Metal to metal bedding doesn’t bother me…..a little devcon (steel putty) and that’s not an issue…..Great Job Ruger!!
    Keep them coming!!!

  • SWFAN January 19, 2012, 10:31 am

    Have a Ruger compact 77 in .308, very short, very handy, especially in enclosed deer stand, quite accurate (much more than I am) rugged, reliable, well engineered, light weight, attractive, reasonably priced for such quality! Have full faith in Ruger engineering and believe the new economy price rifle to be an excellent offering and should sell well as it compares very favorably with competitiors pricing but outdistancing them in quality.

  • troop emonds January 19, 2012, 10:38 am

    Own many Rugers, and three model 77s in particular. I like the old 77 action and the 24″ stainless barrels, laminated stocks. Would like a regular 77 in 44 magnum and another in 6.5 Creedmore. New design is hard to get used to. I like the Model 77 Hawkeyes!

  • Mike January 19, 2012, 11:10 am

    I have a Savage 99 carbine in .308 and love the rotary mag. Would love to see this gun in .250 Savage, .260 Remington, .257 Roberts and 6.5X55 or even 30/30 (had a 788 Remington in 30/30 AI that shot sub-minute with 150 gr. Speers and Noslers). Those would make more sense than .270 or 30/06 in such a lightweight gun that seems aimed at the beginners market.

  • Doc January 19, 2012, 12:35 pm

    Curious, I was considering it more for tactical use, Flash Suppressor, Bipod etcetera… wonder will they do a Tactical Version..
    Doc: Out:

  • Jerry January 19, 2012, 12:50 pm

    This rifle looks like a the Savage Axis/Edge with the added benefit of what ressembles the Savage Accu Trigger. Ruger has deffinately made some top notch products but with regards to the photos above, looks to be a knock off of the Axis/Edge rifle. I wish the boys at ruger would go back to the original Model 77. The Ruger 77V was a top notch rifle in its day! You can’t blame a gun company for trying to keep up with the Jones’s but walk to the beat of a different drum. Be original and do your own thing. Want to make a new addition to your lineup? Make a rifle that is a true, honest to goodness rifle that a real hunter/rifleman carries. Ruger’s most original offering to the public in years is the Gunsite Scout. I bet if we knew the truth the action and stock of this rifle was probably made by the same company that made the action and stock used in the Savage Axis/Edge rifle. And you want even more truth….Wouldn’t suprise me if the work, materials and the company that built it arent OVERSEAS.

    • Walleye0406 January 22, 2012, 7:54 pm

      I actually have it on good report that the materials, parts and even the machines used too build this gun ARE American. Look for pictures of Gingrich holding the American and you’ll see part of the manufacturing cell. Haas machines, American made American owned.

    • Jason June 18, 2014, 1:43 pm

      Then you should learn the meaning of “100% American Made.”

  • Daryl January 19, 2012, 1:02 pm

    Looks to me like they took a Tikka T3 and a Savage and through them together and this is what they got! I would personally like to see an American gun maker make a quality rifle instead of these cheap plastic things!

  • thomas carne January 19, 2012, 4:06 pm

    Ruger’s strong point is the angled bedding bolt and recoil lug. Fully bedded in a wooden stock I had a 30-06 Model 77 that would shoot all day” dry brushing the barrel every 10 rounds” into the same hole at 100 yards from USMC prone and sitting positions. Where is the recoil lug on the new hunter rifle? The controlled feeding was an improvement over previous design and the 77 safety was also an improvement, why throw it all away in the new design?

  • A Martin January 19, 2012, 7:01 pm

    I guess Ruger or GunsAmerica didn’t like my earlier comment… Which was that with a tang safety, what looks like a barrel nut, and an “accutrigger” is this the new “Savage” or a Ruger? What’s with the LCP = KELTEC P3AT, or the new Ruger .22 = Walther P22??? Any explanations?

    • Eli March 1, 2012, 10:42 am

      i don’t see anyone complaining that almost all weapons manufacturers have copied the original 1911 design, some have even tweaked it, I mean really. What is wrong with a weapons manufacturer taking a well placed design and reworking it or even just improving upon it? Kinda like saying oh no, you changed that deer jerky recipe that my father made for 30 years, then taking a bite and finding out that it is way better than your dads ever was. Don’t knock something until you actually try it.

  • Arthur January 19, 2012, 10:02 pm

    I have got to have one of these!!1

  • W. Poarch January 19, 2012, 10:39 pm

    No wonder Ben thinks that the recoil hurts. Look how he is holding the rifle. Only the bottom third of the butt is against his shoulder. Most anything larger than 22 LR might hurt you if it were held like that.

  • Dave S January 20, 2012, 12:04 am

    The rifle sounds interesting, except for the loss of the 3 position safety.
    I too have had several model 77′s My favorite is a Scout rifle in 300 WSM. It has a fixed power Leupold long eye relief (scout) scope and the short 16.5 ” barrel. It is amazingly accurate and I have shot deer up to 300 yards with the gun. I do not care for the looks of the laminated stock but that is outweighed by my overall satisfaction with this unique package.

  • Tom D January 20, 2012, 5:46 pm

    Congrats Ruger! Now get this rifle out in 6.5 Creedmoor ASAP! A perfect starter for a young’un.

  • bhp9 January 22, 2012, 6:16 pm

    I do not like 70 degree multi-lug bolt guns. They prevent you from a making a rapid second shot because they have a much stiffer bolt lift than the 2 lug Mauser system. I don not like plasticky stocks as they are cold, clammy and slippery in bad weather. I do not like hammer fudged barrels as they tend to throw shots as they heat up.

    I recently had an old sporterized Military Mauser rebuilt with a super accurate custom Shilen barrel for a paltry $650 bucks. It had a gorgeous walnut stock, real hand checkering (not junk machine cut checkering). I put a Timney trigger in it and glassed and floated the barrel. I polished the barrel to a mirror finish and re-blued it. It will shoot 1/2 minute of angle all day long with its light sporter weight barrel. Few people know that German Military Mauser actions were built to such a high standard of quality that today it would be considered blue printing. They were made from forgings not modern junk castings. Thats the way they used to make real quality rifles

    • Eli March 1, 2012, 10:38 am

      I like how you can make decisions without ever picking up one and working the action. I picked up a Ruger American yesterday at a store and worked the action….IT was buttery smooth. I also own a M77 Mark 2 Frontier with the Mauser Action, it is lovely do not get me wrong, but the American rifles action was really smooth and almost silent. You could probably have a deer standing under your tree stand and cycle a round into the chamber without the deer hearing it. I think it is lovely, the action is almost more closely related to a sniper rifle on the smoothness and quietness of the action. I really wish people would not come to conclusions on things that they have not physically held in their hands, and how they will read what others say and just “run with the herd” on an idea. Be yourself, do not make a decision on what your friends say or even what a stranger says on a website or forum. I am personally going to buy 3 of them, I have a 16 and 18 year old step sons, this will be their first gun and for me, I own a few other rifles and I want one for the light weight and performance of a rifle under $400. Also, the comment about a hammer forged barrel….they have been using cold hammer forged barrels in high dollar sniper rifles, military M4′s, and civilian Ar-15′s. Do you even know anything about guns that someone else hasn’t made your mind for you.

      • Doug76 April 15, 2012, 12:48 am

        Hear, hear Eli.
        I just bought an American myself, in .308, and find it a well fitted firearm, very easy to use and quite accurate. And it certainly wasn’t throwing rounds after heating up. The safety is great for a left-hander such as myself, and the bolt is slippery smooth to cock after firing, no sticking there!
        An excellent entry level rifle with much higher than entry level quality. Way to go Ruger!

        • Doug May 29, 2012, 1:09 am

          What 308 ammunition have you used, for this rifle, and what would you recommend using; for hunting applications?

          Thank you

          • Administrator May 29, 2012, 8:15 pm

            It is a .30-06 and suitable for all north american game.

  • Walleye0406 January 22, 2012, 8:14 pm

    Aahhh, it’s finally out after less than a year since the light bulb in someone’s head. It seems modeled after many similar guns by savage, mossburg, tikka, Remington, Browning, TC, etc. Ruger took the best proven tech of its competitors and improved upon it, combining those to make a Truely superior gun. I believe new rounds are on the way once they can keep up with current demand. Compare this gun to a Remington side by side, and youll see that the Ruger has a more finished and refined look, though I admit it is still no eye catcher. Msrp $450, but the price youll probably find is really around $350. Many of their new guns are designed in this manner, but they still make the occasional totally original gun like the Ruger Scout rifle. I can’t wait for them to come out with a good pump shotgun. Indeed the LCR is very similar to the keltech, and theres probably a reason for that, just as it is similar to other guns.

    • Administrator January 23, 2012, 3:20 am

      It is nice to see some people get it. Why wouldn’t you improve on successful designs, especially when many of them were trying to eat away at your market share when they made them to begin with? Ruger has a really nice rifle here, and they didn’t cheap out and leave out any features because of the pricepoint.

  • Bill K January 24, 2012, 10:53 am

    Now for a 204 Ruger and 6.5 creedmore and a 20 VarTarg and it will be a really seller.

  • Harry Snippe January 31, 2012, 4:15 am

    It might just be the ticket we just wait and see .As it looks on paper the trigger in itself might just sell the gun as with the new detachable mag.
    Some viewers don’t like the looks of the gun but each to their own . It is a new design for Ruger far away from anything they built and I think it might just grow on you .I appeals to me
    I don’t like light weight barrels being the lad that likes to shoot his hunting rifles @ the range as well as the bush !
    I wait to hear how well these guns shoot after a five round group. If it will pass this test I think we just might have a keeper .
    The 3006 in this weight of gun might just bring your attention after firing ,so I would stick to the 308 parent case .
    I am surprised not to see the 22/250 or at least Rugers own 204 .Well maybe things yet to come .
    Here is hoping Ruger does well with the new rifle

  • Steve March 26, 2012, 12:59 pm

    I bought this gun a week ago. I have always been a bolt action fan due to its inherent accuracy. That being said, this is my favorite rifle. It has the best trigger pull of any rifle I own. The bolt is smooth, (obviously not as smooth as my 30-40 Krag) and it has a very smooth feel and look. I shot 10 rounds through it at 100 yards and every shot placed within 1 1/2″. This is actually my first .308 and it will be my premier white tail hunting rifle. Way to go Ruger!

    • Administrator March 26, 2012, 1:29 pm

      Agreed on that one.

  • Doug76 April 15, 2012, 12:53 am

    As for added calibers in the line up, I would like to see any of several .22 size rounds, such as the .223 Rem or the .22-250, but after my experience lately with this round, I’d really like to see it come out in 7.62×39. I really like this round!
    Waiting for the left-hand version, then I’ll pass my current .308 on to my best friend.

  • Bill May 23, 2012, 6:11 pm

    Cheap plastic clip with too much movement and rattles.

    • Brennan August 19, 2012, 4:16 pm

      I really enjoy this rifle. I’ve got it in 30-06. The clip fits very well and does not rattle. Great gun I personally love it. Will be my go to gun.

  • Logan November 27, 2012, 9:42 pm

    This is a great rifle. While it may be more of an entry level piece, it has a number of good features. Owning a number of Ruger firearms, The American will go well beside of them in the gun safe. It is a fun rifle to shoot, and it’s size makes it ideal for walking and stalking or a great one to take camping. I have been running a journal on this rifle, and will track to see how it handle different ammo loads and temperature variances.

  • John December 18, 2012, 1:04 am

    Shouldered one in the store today. Didn’t like the soft rubber butt pad as it caught on my coat. A deal breaker for me. What’s up with that? Prefer the hard pad on my 25-year-old Ruger 77 30-06 (or even the metal one on my Dad’s 1917 Enfield). Why hang something like this on a tiny .243?

  • larry Jantz June 2, 2013, 11:55 am

    Ruger All American impressions
    I first shot one in .243. A guy unknown by me was sighting in his new rifle with a Nikon P223 scope. I said ” do you mind if I handle it”. He said shoot it. The Winchester factory 55 grain silvertips printed an estimated 3/4 inch group. Good first impression. As soon as I could buy one at a price of $320 including a $10 back ground check I did. Groups with various factory ammo hover around an inch. The rifle shines with reloads. My brother shot a .334 3 shot group using a 70 gr. Sierra match BT bullets and a powder charge one grain below max of superperformance powder. Later I shot a .377 group with 100 grain sierra flat base bullets and a max charge of IMR 4350. Both of these groups were at 100 Y over a Toyota PU hood. Not a fancy concrete bench. A Bushnell 1500 rangefinder confirmed the range.
    After using an old 3-9 Leupold for these groups I put a Zeiss 3-15 on it.
    So far the rifle is holding it’s zero. The only complaint I have is the rifle will jam more than you want when you drop a shell in for single shots. Unless you roll it and tilt the gun the bullet will not center itself and go into the chamber. Operation out of the magazine is flawless.

  • Bill B September 2, 2013, 8:26 am

    Anyone purchasing a Ruger American will be well served. It is a very good basic hunting rifle. I’ve had two of them; a 243 and a 22-250. Note, had. With some work with handloads sub MOA is achievable-if not maintainable. The barrel taper is too thin. The “V” block bedding system provides no discernible benefit, especially when combined with the aforementioned thin barrel and a really cheesy stock..free floated only when either the right side or left side fore end is Not touching the barrel. Bipod use will always force the fore end to touch the barrel = inconsistent groups. The magazine, while made from composite, is a work of art in function.
    Buy one it’s OK… As for me… Savage 11 …243 Win.. best trigger thingie.. consistently accurate..better stock and barrel contour… Having said all that, I have a Ruger American 22WMR on lay a way…oh, well.

  • Lane Crawley November 18, 2014, 4:59 am

    Any chance this ruger American rifle manufactured with a heavy barrel??

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