Subscribe To the GunsAmerica Digest and News This Week

Cheap Guns: Taurus’ Budget Friendly PT 111 Millennium G2 9mm—Full Review.

Send to Kindle


For more information, visit http://www.taurususa.com/.

To purchase a Taurus PT 111 Millennium G2 pistol on GunsAmerica.com click on this link: https://www.gunsamerica.com/Search.aspx?T=Taurus%20pt111.

For some people, a sub-compact (barrel length less than 3.5 inches) single stack 9mm handgun just fits the bill for their concealed carry requirements. Taurus International Manufacturing understands this and offers sub-compact 9mm handguns designed around both single-stack and double-stack magazines. The Millennium G2 series of handguns was introduced in 2013 and is the double stack counterpart of the Taurus 709 Slim series of sub-compact single stack handguns. The G2 appendage on the Taurus Millennium name designates these models as second generation designs of the previously produced Millennium series pistols. Taurus went back to the drawing board for the Millennium G2 series, and has included a host of new features making them even better suited for concealed carry than their predecessors. Millennium G2 handguns are loaded with desirable features, yet remain very attractively priced. The PT 111 sent for review has a stainless steel slide and a retail price of $316.  All Taurus PT 111 models ship with two magazines and are covered by the Taurus Lifetime Service program.

The PT 111 favors the right-handed shooter. All controls are positioned on the left side of the frame. The thumb shelf and trigger finger memory pads are replicated on both sides of the frame.

The PT 111 favors the right-handed shooter. All controls are positioned on the left side of the frame. The thumb shelf and trigger finger memory pads are replicated on both sides of the frame.

SPECS

  • Chambering: 9mm
  • Barrel: 3.2 inches
  • OA Length: 6.24 inches
  • Weight: 22 ounces
  • Grips: Integral
  • Sights: White three-dot with windage and elevation adjustable rear sight
  • Action: Single-action and double-action
  • Finish: Matte stainless
  • Capacity: 12+1
  • MSRP: $316

HIDDEN GEM

With just a quick glance, you might dismiss the Taurus PT 111 as just another polymer-framed striker fired sub-compact handgun. Then you grip it for the first time and immediately appreciate how comfortable it feels in your hand. Looking it over more closely, you start to notice the extra things that make the PT 111 more than just a run of the mill sub-compact. The fully adjustable rear sight, Picatinny standard frame rail, and how the frame and slide have been carefully contoured to remove sharp edges. Opening the manual, you learn about additional features like the unique single-action/double-action trigger and Taurus Security System. There is certainly more to the pistol than meets the eye.

The PT 111 can be field stripped without additional tools. The disassembly latch is located on the frame slightly ahead and directly above the trigger.

The PT 111 can be field stripped without additional tools. The disassembly latch is located on the frame slightly ahead and directly above the trigger.

As I started the review, I will admit that I tempered my expectations a bit when I discovered the current retail and real-world prices of the Millennium G2 pistols. How well-crafted could a $300 pistol be? After receiving the pistol, I gave it a good once-over looking for obvious flaws or problems. The polymer frame had the same mold lines as more expensive poly framed pistols. The bead-blasted slide and barrel had a nice even finish. Taurus even applied a high polish to the barrel hood where it shows through the ejection port of the slide. I was almost ready to declare perfect fit and finish when I discovered a tiny area of tool marks directly above the extractor. Hardly noticeable, and certainly not anything that detracted from the reliable operation of the pistol. In the end, Taurus raised my expectations of the quality a customer can expect in a value-priced handgun.

The black polymer sights have a white 3-dot pattern. The rear sight is adjustable for both windage and elevation.

The black polymer sights have a white three-dot pattern. The rear sight is adjustable for both windage and elevation.

Fit and finish aside, the trigger and sights on a handgun contribute greatly to accurate operation. The PT 111 has a unique single-action/double-action trigger system that operates like most other single-action striker fired handguns. As the slide moves to the rear after firing, the striker is pre-cocked for the next shot. The unique part is that if the chambered round fails to fire, the trigger can be pulled again in double-action fashion for a second strike. It may never be needed, but it’s nice to know the capability is there if necessary. The single-action trigger pull is long and breaks with an average pull weight of 8 pounds, 6 ounces. Interestingly, the double-action trigger pull is actually lighter at 6 pounds 7 ounces, but you probably won’t need the double-action trigger pull. Spoiler alert … I never did during the review.

Taurus installs low profile polymer sights, with a white three dot pattern, on the PT 111. The rear sight is adjustable for both windage and elevation via two recessed adjustment screws located on the side of the sight. Finding a fully adjustable rear sight on a sub-compact pistol was unique for me and something I took full advantage of when I got the pistol out on the range.

RANGE TIME

Taurus includes two magazines with the PT 111. Both have extended baseplates that allowed the author to get all three fingers comfortably on the grip.

Taurus includes two magazines with the PT 111. Both have extended baseplates that allowed the author to get all three fingers comfortably on the grip.

Range time brought additional discoveries about the PT 111. The PT 111 ships with two 12-round magazines. The magazines are steel and feature extended polymer base pads that mate well with the bottom of the magazine well. The gap between the bottom of the grip and top of the base pad is small enough that skin can’t come between the two pieces and get pinched during firing. The magazines are a challenge to load. I rarely use a magazine loading tool, but found using it was much more comfortable than trying to load the magazines to full capacity by hand. Once fully loaded, the magazines lock easily into the pistol with a gentle push. Slam them home if you feel compelled to do so, but it’s not necessary. Once emptied, the magazines drop freely from the magazine well with a firm push on the magazine release.

At the range, the first order of business was adjusting the rear sight to fit the sight picture I prefer with concealed carry handguns. Taurus provides photo illustrated instructions in the PT 111 instruction manual that walks you thought the adjustment process. In my case, I shot a sample group of 13 rounds. Following the provided instructions, I moved the sight a little and shot a second five-round group. I adjusted the sights again and shot another five-round group. After one final adjustment, my fourth group was another 13 round string that showed I had raised the point of impact to exactly where I wanted it to be. Once set, I never touched the sight adjustment screws again for the duration of the review.

Shooting from a braced off-hand position, 10 yard groups averaged 1.95 inches for the four loads tested. The light-weight Polycase ARX was a stand out with a sub one inch group.

Shooting from a braced off-hand position, 10 yard groups averaged 1.95 inches for the four loads tested. The light-weight Polycase ARX was a stand out with a sub one inch group.

Following the sight adjustment instructions in the manual, the author moved the point of impact from target 1 to final adjustment on target 4.

Following the sight adjustment instructions in the manual, the author moved the point of impact from target 1 to final adjustment on target 4.

15 - LThe gripping surfaces of the frame have small patches of aggressive stippling molded in at time of manufacturing. There are two patches on each side of the grip as well as one on both the front and back straps. Above the grip area, Taurus has molded in an abbreviated thumb rest on each side of the frame. Directly ahead and above the trigger guard are two scalloped areas that Taurus calls Memory Pads. When your trigger finger is outside the trigger guard, it should be resting on the Memory Pad. With a magazine inserted in the pistol, I could easily get all my fingers comfortably on the grip. For me, the extended base pad gave me plenty of room for a full grip on the pistol.

Weighing in at 30 ounces fully loaded in a light-weight Remora holster, the author finds the PT 111 best suited for waistband, or belt carry.

Weighing in at 30 ounces fully loaded in a light-weight Remora holster, the author finds the PT 111 best suited for waistband or belt carry.

A small section of Picatinny standard rail is molded into the frame. Small lasers, like this Crimson Trace Rail Master, can be attached to the rail. Massive scallops on the slide save weight and improve the look of pistol.

A small section of Picatinny standard rail is molded into the frame. Small lasers, like this Crimson Trace Rail Master, can be attached to the rail. Massive scallops on the slide save weight and improve the look of the pistol.

With a full grip on the pistol, and plenty of stippling to help me hold the pistol, I found the PT 111 to be easy to shoot with modest recoil. The heavy recoil spring assembly and 22-ounce weight of the pistol also help dampen some of the recoil snap. Using 124 grain +P defense ammunition increases the recoil a bit, but it’s a pistol you won’t mind shooting for extended practice sessions.

After familiarizing myself a bit more with the PT 111, I shot some 10 yard braced offhand groups for accuracy. By carefully staging the trigger and taking my time, it was fairly easy to repetitively send five-shot groups into a 3-inch circle. When I was satisfied with my ability to operate the pistol, the final groups were recorded and tallied. Using four different varieties of defensive ammunition, all grouped under 3 inches. I’m satisfied the PT 111 is accurate enough to serve as a concealed carry option.

A loaded chamber indicator is positioned on the top of the slide. It’s large enough for visual and tactile confirmation that the chamber is loaded.

A loaded chamber indicator is positioned on the top of the slide. It’s large enough for visual and tactile confirmation that the chamber is loaded.

Taurus includes two keychain tools with the PT 111. The flat blade is used to adjust the windage and elevation screws on the rear sight. The other tool is used to activate the Taurus Security System located on the slide directly below the rear sight.

Taurus’ included keychain tool has a flat blade used to adjust the rear sight. The other part activates the Taurus Security System located on the slide directly below the rear sight.

Using a Remora clip-less inside the waistband holster, I spent some time practicing drawing from concealment and shooting short stings of fire on an IDPA target set at 5 yards. For these drills, I activated the frame-mounted, non-ambidextrous safety lever when the pistol was holstered. I didn’t find it slowed me down to deactivate the safety during the draw. The safety lever is large enough to catch with your thumb by sweeping it down over the slide during the draw. As with most things, practice makes perfect so if you plan to use the safety it’s best to commit to using it all the time when practicing at the range. During these drills, my on-target results were good with the majority of my shots landing in the center of mass.

The overall dimensions and weight of the PT 111 make it ideal for discrete inside the waistband carry.

The overall dimensions and weight of the PT 111 make it ideal for discrete inside the waistband carry.

For the balance of the review I ran several hundred rounds through the PT 111 using various holds with targets set between 12 and 25 yards. When the final round count was tallied, I had put over 450 rounds through the review pistol. The functional performance of the pistol was perfect. There were no failures of any kind on the range.

Doing a final cleaning on the pistol before completing my review pictures, the pistol still looks brand new after 450+ rounds fired. The pistol appears to be built for a lifetime of shooting. If it does develop a problem, Taurus has you covered with their Lifetime Service program.

CONCLUSIONS

I’ll admit my personal preference gravitates to slim single-stack concealed carry pistols. When the pistol is too large to fit in a pocket, my usual carry preference is appendix inside the waistband (AIWB). This is where I carried the PT 111 for several days. I found it short enough to be comfortable while sitting or driving and really wasn’t significantly wider than most single stack pistols I currently own. The additional quarter inch of width was noticeable on day one and forgotten by day three. Carrying the PT 111 definitely changed my perception of double-stack handguns carried AIWB.

The PT 111 has a unique single-action and double-action trigger. Single-action trigger pull weight was about two pounds heavier than the double-action trigger pull weight (inset).

The PT 111 has a unique single-action and double-action trigger. Single-action trigger pull weight was about two pounds heavier than the double-action trigger pull weight (inset). Yep, you read that right.

Six patches of fairly aggressive stippled grip texture are molded into the frame. The author liked the feel of the texturing, but others may find it too aggressive for their liking.

Six patches of fairly aggressive stippled grip texture are molded into the frame. The author liked the feel of the texturing, but others may find it too aggressive for their liking.

In its fourth year of production, the Millennium G2 series has an established track record in the market. At the current retail price points, they appear to be an incredible value with performance on par with similarly designed handguns with much higher retail prices. I’m frequently asked to suggest brands and types of firearms by family, friends and acquaintances. I will certainly include the Taurus PT 111 Millennium G2 on my list of future suggestions.

For more information, visit http://www.taurususa.com/.

To purchase a Taurus PT 111 Millennium G2 pistol on GunsAmerica.com click on this link: https://www.gunsamerica.com/Search.aspx?T=Taurus%20pt111.

{ 43 comments… add one }
  • RGM October 5, 2016, 11:39 pm

    I have this gun. All hopes were high. First the travel on the trigger is too long. Once I got used to it, i started having failures to feed (not sure if those were magazine related). And then: the slide would not return to battery. The recoil spring broke (100rds). Anyone that says this is normal is crazy. Called Taurus and they said: parts are not included in the warranty……
    Forgetaboutit!

  • Andrew N. September 14, 2016, 9:33 pm

    Taurus has a lifetime warranty on their products, they just don’t want to stand behind it. Like others here, I had a problem with a magazine and sent it back Insured to obtain a signature upon receipt. They acted like I was trying to steal from them, despite proof that their employee had signed for the defective mag. I asked to speak to a Supervisor and got the same treatment. I will NEVER buy another Taurus product.

  • Martin September 14, 2016, 9:55 am

    I purchased a new Taurus 709 Slim based on a gun magazine review of 10 single stack handguns. It was one of only three that went 1000 rounds without a malfunction. The other two were a Glock and a HK. From the get-go the slide would lock back before feeding the last round. I tried several different brands of ammo but the result was the same. Contacted Taurus technical support and the lady asked if it shipped with more than one mag cause she thought it was a mag problem. She should know their products and that it only came with one mag. Would not ship a new mag until I sent the old mag at my expense. Two weeks later I received new mag and had a single shot pistol until then. It appears to have fixed problem but new mag does not drop free. Overall, unhappy with customer support and will not be purchasing Taurus in future.

  • Matt September 13, 2016, 5:08 pm

    I’ve owned one Taurus revolver and couldn’t wait to get rid of it. Was at the range couple of days ago and the guy next to me had this same pistol being reviewed. He couldn’t get it to fire, first thing I asked him was had he cleaned the gun before coming to the range and he had. I checked the spent unfired rounds and there was the faintest strike on the primer. I told him he would likely need to send it to Taurus and good look their customer service and when he got it back get rid of it. Most gun shops won’t take a Taurus in trade. I also told him Ruger makes some dependable pistol in the same price range. Like me he had to learn the hard way to avoid Taurus.

  • Budreaux September 13, 2016, 4:21 pm

    I currently own two of the PT-111 G2’s. The older one has had around 3K rounds through it. Never, not even once, has it malfunctioned and eats everything that I’ve fed it. The newer one has only about 1K through it. Like the older one, it has never malfunctioned and eats anything I feed it.

    I find that most people who trash talk Taurus have never owned one, never fired one and, in most cases, have never even touched one.. Yes, there are a few who have had problems. But, they all have problems. My friend with the Sig Sauer P250 40 Cal. has had innumerable issues with his pistol. My Step son has a Springfield that’s been back to the factory twice.

    So, if you don’t like Taurus Pistols, don’t buy one. Pretty simple huh?

  • John Myers September 13, 2016, 11:53 am

    I own one of these. Initially, I loved it. The trigger didn’t bother me. I liked everything about the gun…

    Then… The other night, I disassembled and reassembled the gun. That’s when the problem started.

    If you reassemble this gun with the slightest wrong placement of the recoil spring assembly, you get this:

    https://youtu.be/V2iIgyd-ufU

    A buddy, who is a gunsmith, was able, with much effort, to get the thing functional again. But, my faith in the gun is gone. Back to a Smith & Wesson Shield for me. Sad that what I thought was a good gun… Isn’t.

  • Paul September 13, 2016, 9:41 am

    Piece of scrap metal, made to look like a gun. 9 out of 10 of my students who brought this gun to class had trouble with it and it was NOT malfunctions due to improper grip. Failure to return to battery and terribly hard to rack the slide were the main things. And that goofey little wire that I assume is the thingy that kicks out the spent shell? Looks like a lost coat hanger!

  • Ron In Dallas September 13, 2016, 12:21 am

    To all you folks that consider Taurus Pieces of junk. I own several and I’ll let you stand at the target end of the range and I’ll use any of my Taurus firearms to shoot you. Who wants to test their internet bravado? Only ONE of my Tauruses have had any modifications and that’s my PT1911 that I put a Wilson combat extended slide release on.
    Here are you choices and I’ll even let you pick the brand ammo you’ll be shot with
    PT 709SS Slim
    PT 111 G1
    PT 111 G2
    PT 1911 – 45acp
    PT 1911 – 38 super (it’s my wifes gun)
    and an old 1985 vintage Taurus Model 66
    So Any Takers? Anyone? Beuller? Bueller?

    • mike October 24, 2016, 5:32 am

      Such a challenge is absurd. Sure your Taurus will likely fire of the first round, the question is will it fire a 2nd, 3rd, or explode in your hand. Taurus make hit and miss clones for cheap. Some are very high quality, others are nothing but junk. Personally owned several that were junk yet have friends who fire reliably every time. Your choice on what you carry. If looking for a plinker I say go Taurus, if looking for a nail to hang your life on, well I would choose another. Issuing forth idiotic challenges proves nothing but close mindedness about a topic.

  • Glenn61 September 12, 2016, 7:59 pm

    I made the horrible mistake of purchasing a Taurus copy of an S&W model 19 back in the 80s.
    Worst, most inaccurate soft metal piece of garbage I have ever wasted money on.

    Every Taurus is made to be a cheap knock-off of a real quality made gun. Taurus incorporates softer metals, lower quality control and an under paid work force.

    If you want a quality striker fire 9mm, spend another 200 dollars and buy yourself a Glock 19, and enjoy all the quality parts, upgrades and accessories that fill the market for a Glock 19 owner to choose from, like factory 33 round mags. titanium parts and numerous spring and trigger kits to alter and customize your Glock 19.
    Basically,,, A Taurus pistol is for the chump who just can’t seem to locate enough self esteem to spend the money for a quality gun, so he can feel good about holding on to a few dollars in exchange for an inferior piece of crap gun.

    • Kerry Bordine September 15, 2016, 3:40 am

      I own two Taurus hand guns and they perform fine, no problems. If I was looking for another hand gun I would look at Taurus!

  • Lonnie September 12, 2016, 6:21 pm

    I have a G2 that I bought earlier this year. I have shot about a thousand rounds through it. Not a single malfunction. I buy ammo for about $10 to $12 . It has never not worked correctly. Mine is the Earth color. I would have been happy with the black one but at that time the Earth one was what my dealer had. Bought it for about $279. I like the way it fits. When I am shooting at the range I load only 10 rounds in the mag. That way I don’t have some loose shells at the end. After each use of shooting, when I get back home I clean it. That’s the way my dad brought me up. Whenever we got home from hunting,” clean your gun”. That way you don’t have any problems with it. It’s a “TOOL” so take care of it! It’s too bad some people have problems with their Taurus guns, maybe they are just unlucky. As for me, I like mine and I am going to keep using it!

  • j. bostick September 12, 2016, 6:02 pm

    I own Sigs, Glocks, Rigers and more in the handgun dept. I fell for the the $200 PT111 G2 last year and was completely impressed by that gun at that price. Is it a Glock, nope, Is the trigger funky? Yes. Is it refined like my P938? Not at all, but it works. It has never failed to go bang when i pull the trigger after 900 plus rnds.

    The major complaints i’ve seen from people involve the sights and the recoil guide rod and both of those can be upgraded through LakeLine now if you so choose. I understand the Taurus hate, they are at best a marginal firearms maker that stumbled onto a very reliable design in this handgun.

  • Eric September 12, 2016, 6:01 pm

    I had the PT111 a number of years ago and shot literally thousands (over 5k minimum), and I didn’t have a single malfunction or issue.
    Maybe because they should have stayed with the IF IT AINT BROKEN DONT FIX IT!! Mantra.
    I may have had the original G1 model but whatever I had it worked flawlessly and their customer service was awesome.
    I DONT KNOW WHAT EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT BUT EVERYTHING ABOUT MY TAURUS WAS AWESOME.

  • Lloyd Jones September 12, 2016, 5:18 pm

    I have several handguns & was never interested in Taurus. After a work buddy purchased the PT111 G2, I bought the only one I could find locally.
    WOW!! A compact 12-shot 9mm that really works & loaded with features.
    Over 500 rounds so far without any problems. And, every shot was a reload! Taurus hit the target bullseye with this one! I’m very impressed with my PT111 G2!

  • Parson September 12, 2016, 4:38 pm

    Honestly, the funnest hand-gun I have ever owned. I got my two as Blem’s for $176 a piece, and we have put about 700 rounds a piece through them so far. My wife is exceptionally please with the gun, and I just couldn’t believe how smoothly it operated. Easy to take down, easy to carry. Honestly, it may be a fluke in the Taurus world, but who cares! These Guns are great. I would recommend them heartily.

  • Spudgun September 12, 2016, 4:27 pm

    We own two of thes in my house, along with three other Non-Tarus 9 mm semi-autos. Each has sent over 1000 rounds down range. No failures of any kind. This is the weapon of choice for two of four CCW permit holders in my family. The third prefers a revolver, the fourth does not carry daily.

    The magazines were initially very stiff as noted by the author. They softened up for me by leaving them fully loaded. Now I can load to capacity without difficulty, still have had no FTF or FTE.

    While I cannot cast doubt on those whose experience was different, I can say I am happy enough to buy another one if the need arises.

  • Magic Rooster September 12, 2016, 4:14 pm

    I got sucked into the Taurus shit storm when I first started shooting. I still have two 2010 model 22 revolvers that work fine. The rest were sold “as is” to a pawn shop. I have never owned a Taurus semi auto, and I don’t plan to.
    “Leave the Taurus………take the cannoli”.

  • Henry September 12, 2016, 2:55 pm

    I’ve had 3 Taurus Tracker revolvers, in .357 and .44 Mag. I’ve always been a S&W man but wanted to save some money. The adjustable rear sights were made of tinfoil. I sold them in disgust and went back to S&W, vowing never again. For some reason, persuaded by reviews like this one, I bought a PT111 at a gun show, proud of myself for paying “only” $230. One trip to the range was enough–what a godawful trigger. It’s now a safe queen.
    I have since purchased an S&W M&P subcompact in 9 mm. Love that gun. Yes, it’s closer to $400. So what? How cheap is $230 when you’re never going to shoot it?
    Last weekend I bought a Walther PPS M2, also in 9 mm, almost exactly the same price as the S&W. Now I’m torn between it and the M&P. I slightly prefer the PPS, definitely prefer its sights. Both guns are superb. Leave the Taurus alone.

  • george bell September 12, 2016, 12:53 pm

    the trigger is the biggest thing that needs improving. it breaks right at the back ….if they fixed that it would be a heck of a gun

  • Ross Walters September 12, 2016, 11:13 am

    Lifetime warranty…what a joke!
    My Taurus worked fine the first couple hundred rounds but then without warning the recoil spring assembly fell apart while shooting at the gun range. Apparently the failure of those recoil devices is a very common problem among Millennium Pro’s so I figured Taurus customer service should have a recall or simply sent owners a replacement for free…think again! The horrible customer service rep I talked to explained that Taurus doesn’t sell gun parts but he was doing me a big favor by making an exception and selling me a new spring for $28 + shipping and he also had the nerve to accuse me of ‘probably mishandling’ the firearm which probably caused the gun failure.
    Last thing I want to carry is a gun that stops working without any warning thus my Millennium Pro is relegated to the basement safe.
    To me Taurus customer service is a joke and their guns are junky. Buy a Kahr instead. Same price – better gun.

  • Ed in OREGON September 12, 2016, 10:57 am

    As a confirmed Glockaholic, I bought one of these PT111 G2 Taurus SS pistols to try since it felt so good in the hand. Surprise! It came through as a winner in accuracy, reliability, and overall value. After never being satisfied with many, many Taurus revolvers, and semi-auto pistols, this one is so great that it is replacing the G26 niche.
    Folks with hand strength problems will also like the easy slide recoil springs that don’t require muscles of a body builder!
    Also, it will utilize SIG 226 magazines made by Mec-Gar and those come in 15 to 20 round capacity and cost less than $25 each. It handles them perfectly, and I find they are not hard to load fully once broken in…just like some Glock magazines. These pistols are maybe a fluke in the Taurus world of guns…it is very capable in all ways to me, and I am very picky and critical!

  • Craig Ramsey September 12, 2016, 10:50 am

    Yawn.
    I question any tool that cost more to use than it cost to buy.
    Feeling sorry that a PT111 will be the only thing some kid inherits from his old man.

  • Jack Keller September 12, 2016, 9:24 am

    Bull the only Taurus I have seen anyone own that works is a Revolver nobody I personally know that owned a Taurus semi auto fed ammo reliably enough to keep you alive in a gun fight. And it didn’t do any good sending them in to try to fix them they still didn’t work right buy a good gun to start with anything but a Taurus even SCCY works better than a Taurus….!!

    • James September 12, 2016, 10:37 am

      Try one before you spout off. If you did you would be singing a different tune.

      • mike September 12, 2016, 2:35 pm

        shaddup. stop being cheap

      • Jack Keller September 13, 2016, 3:35 pm

        I did try one it was a 709 Slim the more I shot it thee less it fed. It started with only about one or two miss feed a magazine after 500 rounds it was down to one or to proper feeds a magazine never loaded 3 in a row again Taurus cancelled my warranty told me I would have to live with or find some else to fix it they are GARBAGE plain and simple anyone dumb enough to use one for self defense is going to find out the hard way you can’t rely on them in a pinch. And you should not jump to conclusions before you run off at the mouth most people that put a negative comment usually have a reason for it.

    • Walter September 13, 2016, 10:28 pm

      SCCY!!!!!!!. WHAT A JOKE I QUESTION YOUR GUN KNOWLEDGE

  • Ram6 September 12, 2016, 9:17 am

    I bought a G2 two years ago and found it to be a an excellent CC firearm. It’s small enough, light enough, and accurate. I passed my CC permit range test with 100% required target hits. I agree with the review about loading the magazines. They are a bear as the spring is exceptionally tight. I’ve never been able to get more than 11 rounds in the gun at any time, load 10, chamber one, load one more. I highly recommend this firearm. I have a CC permit from the State of Tennessee and carry this regularly.

  • Ken W. September 12, 2016, 9:13 am

    I bought one earlier this year for around $220 at a local shop. I carry it in a N8² pro IWB holster. Perfectly concealable and comfortable to carry. The trigger was a bit odd to me at first but after a bit of practice I’ve found it to be a quite serviceable and accurate weapon.

  • Coyote September 12, 2016, 9:09 am

    My wife and I have two of these, hers in 9mm and mine in 40. We have nothing but praise for these firearms. We bought them while Taurus was giving the rebate and got them for about $200 each. Each time we are at the range I am more impressed with the functionality and dependability of the firearms. While cleaning I am impressed with the design. Taurus has much to answer for in years past, but the G2 series is answering loudly.

  • Ray September 12, 2016, 8:55 am

    I own the same gun that was reviewed in the test. All I can say is that it is my carry weapon, put hundreds of rounds through it and haven’t had a single glitch. I’d buy another one.

  • Nevadabob September 12, 2016, 8:19 am

    Very good unbiased review! I have 2 PT111 G2’s. Got my 2nd one a couple of months ago via trade/swap. The original owner felt it was “too small” for his hands and was interested in what I had to trade for. He only put 50 rounds through it! It’s an excellent shooter just like my first G2. Both shoot my reloads just fine.

  • Marcelino September 12, 2016, 7:25 am

    Bruce Flemings is a good reviewer; stated all the important consideration of the gun; especially the trigger pull. But when my life is at stake I need reliability and Taurus; as mention above has had issues with dependability. I’ll keep glocking on.

  • flipfew September 12, 2016, 6:06 am

    I can’t say enough good things about this pistol! I own (3) of them, both me and my wife carry one and we keep one in out safe. Only paid $197 each shipped from kyguns, I have over 1200 rounds through one of them with not a single failure of any kind. I probably dropped it on hard surfaces like concrete and tile about 8 or 9 times in the three years of ownership and it’s taken every one like a champ….
    not that I recommend dropping your firearm and Nor am I proud of it but when it cost $197 it stings a little less.

    my only complaint would be after 3 years of Carrie in the hot Arizona summer I’m starting to get a little bit of surface rust on the slide where I get body contact and sweat in the holster

  • Bugler2 September 12, 2016, 5:23 am

    Good review. I bought a G2 on sale for $200 about a year ago and I’ve fired several hundred rounds without a hiccup. I carry it often without hesitation. The G2, in my experience, is an excellent value–maybe THE best value in concealed carry 9MM’s.

  • DC September 12, 2016, 4:33 am

    I own one of these and shoot it quite regularly the author is more than on par with everything he’s said, excellent review!! Thank u for telling the truth about a cheap gun that’s awesome

  • Mike September 12, 2016, 4:31 am

    I owned the predecessor to the millennium G2 and have looked at this gun which seems to utilize the same design. It was a horrible gun that I sent back 3 times to get fixed finally pawning it at a loss. I have purchased several Taurus guns throughout my life and all have proven to be unreliable guns. My family has had similar experiences as well. While I can’t vouch for this particular model I have found the brand Taurus itself to be a product I would never suggest staking my life upon. For a cheap fun to shoot gun they are great but at the $300 price point that you find this gun at, if your looking for a 1 gun for all purchase you would be much better off saving another $100 or so and purchasing a used Glock or Springfield. I personally don’t think Glocks are comfortable and feel cheap in the hand that said they have a proven track record of producing consistently reliable guns as well as Springfield. When it comes to what you are hanging your life on going “Budget” is not wise and if your really are stuck to a budget something like a Charter or Rossi revolver will cost about the same and revolvers are far simpler designs with far more room for “Cheap construction” than semi autos. While I doubt I am as experienced as the above writer I do work I a field that has a lot of experience with firearms and am a licensed firearm instructor so I do have some experience and with Taurus it has all been bad both professionally and personally. I have talked to a few who claim to have good experience but usually I find their “Standard” for acceptable malfunction is far looser than mine, for example if I have 1 malfunction in 100 rounds I am not at all pleased unless I am using cheap junk ammo that I expect to malfunction and even then I am concerned and often will not use such a gun for more than plinking.

    • Dillon Sheetz September 12, 2016, 9:51 am

      4 taurus handguns, thousands of rounds down range, not a single malfunction in any.

      845 in .45 acp
      1911fs in .45acp
      Tracker revolver in .357 magnum
      and Pt-111 in 9mm

      All of those guns have reputations for reliability though. None of them costs more than $500 and ill say the PT-111 for it being $199 out the door, offers something you dont get even in guns that cost double that price. and yes at $199 MOST decent handguns cost double that or more.

    • mike September 12, 2016, 2:37 pm

      your fault. stop buying the same thing. learn!

    • David S September 12, 2016, 9:58 pm

      I understand what you are saying and like you didn’t think much of Taurus but the G2 has changed my mind. I have been reserching guns for years and finally bought my first pistol a while back. It was…you guessed it a G2. I have fired Sigs, HK, Glocks, S&W semi and revolvers and thought I wanted a revolver. With the increasing price for ammo decided I wanted a 9mm and for its size and ease to carry and after talking it over with my friend at the gun store (I was needing a budget friendly gun and wanted a CC semi) he conviced le to try the G2. Unlike my experience with the other high dollar “dependables” I have never had a malfunction (so many struggle with HP ammo). I have shot plinkers, HP, ATX and most anything else I could get my hands on and have never fould anything it won’t fire flawlessly (I am not gonna try wadcutters, that’s just stupid), anyway, this G2 has never missed. My gal loves this gun and is so much more acurate with it we have traded my G2 for her Glock. If you don’t want Taurus because of quality concerns (after all they produced a revolver that would jam-up) I understand but if you can keep an open mind about this one I am sure you’ll be surprised.

  • m.cumpston September 8, 2016, 3:15 pm

    Great pictures and fine review. This writer is a real asset to gunsamerica

Leave a Comment

Send this to friend