Heizer Defense PS1 Pocket Shotgun Pistol – New Gun Review

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The PS1 Pocket Shotgun from Heizer Defense is a single-shot pistol chambered for .410 gauge shotshells and 45 Colt cartridges.)

The PS1 Pocket Shotgun from Heizer Defense is a single-shot pistol chambered for .410 gauge shotshells and 45 Colt cartridges.

By Bruce Flemings
http://www.heizerdefense.com/

The .410 gauge single-shot shotgun has a long history of dispatching snakes and other small pests. Over the years, several companies have offered small and light-weight .410 shotguns with names like Snake Charmer and Snake Tamer so there would be no mistake about their intended use. The Heizer PS1 miniaturizes the single-shot .410 shotgun to a pistol that rides as easily in your pocket as it would in your tackle box.

Heizer Defense is a new name in the firearm marketplace, but its manufacturing roots run deep in the Aerospace Industry. Heizer Defense is a subsidiary of Pevely, Missouri-based Heizer Aerospace, located just south of St. Louis, Mo. Heizer’s first entry into the market is the PS1 Pocket Shotgun Pistol, chambered for .410 gauge 2.5” shotshells as well as 45 Colt cartridges. The single-shot pistol is marketed as the “Ideal companion for hunter/fisherman/hiker”.

Heizer PS1 Pocket Shotgun Specifications:

Weight – 21 1/8 oz.

Heizer ships itsPS1 in a box as slim as the pistol.

Heizer ships itsPS1 in a box as slim as the pistol.

Height – 3 7/8″

Width – .72″Length – 5.7″

MSRP – $499

Stainless Steel Frame and Barrel

Finish – ISONITE (salt bath nitriding) Matte Black

Other finish options include: Polished, Military Green, Bronze, Prison Pink, Desert Tan, and White Cerakote

: Cable lock, fired case, Owner’s Manual and a generic soft pistol rug are included with the PS1 pistol.

: Cable lock, fired case, Owner’s Manual and a generic soft pistol rug are included with the PS1 pistol.

The Heizer PS1 ships in a flat cardboard box resembling a small pizza box. Emblazoned with the Heizer ‘Flaming H’ logo, the box opens to reveal the usual items you would expect to receive with a new pistol. Heizer ships the PS1 in a black padded zipper case suitable for transportation to and from the range. A cable lock, fired case and Owner’s Manual are also included in the box.

The PS1 has a very short overall length and thumbs-forward shooters will want to adopt a revolver grip to avoid potential injury to their support hand thumb.

The PS1 has a very short overall length and thumbs-forward shooters will want to adopt a revolver grip to avoid potential injury to their support hand thumb.

Two thoughts crossed my mind as I handled the PS1 for the first time. My first thought was that the pistol was substantially heavier than it looked. My second thought was the PS1 was built like a tank. Built entirely of stainless steel, the PS1 weighs just over 21 ounces. The shape of the grip fit really well in my hand. With only one barrel, the bore line is very low. For me, the PS1 pointed very naturally. Closing my eyes and bringing the pistol up to eye-line had the sights in nearly perfect alignment when I opened my eyes. Since the pistol is so short, I quickly realized that my support-side thumb extended beyond the muzzle with my normal thumbs-forward grip. I made a mental note to use a revolver style grip technique when I finally got the PS1 out to the range.

A captive barrel pivot pin joins the barrel and the frame and is easily pushed through the frame for disassembly and cleaning.

A captive barrel pivot pin joins the barrel and the frame and is easily pushed through the frame for disassembly and cleaning.

The PS1 pocket shotgun consists of two primary components. The barrel assembly attaches to the frame with a single barrel pivot pin. Removing the barrel from the frame is as simple as pushing out the captive barrel pivot pin from the left side of the frame until it stops against the right side of the frame. The only tool you need is your thumb to complete this operation. With the barrel pivot pin pushed aside, the barrel assembly lifts off the frame. No further disassembly is required to complete routine cleaning and lubrication.

The spring loaded extractor easily lifts spent hulls and brass from the chamber. The massive under-barrel locking lug locks the barrel to the frame when firing.)

The spring loaded extractor easily lifts spent hulls and brass from the chamber. The massive under-barrel locking lug locks the barrel to the frame when firing.

Heizer machines all frames and barrels at its in-house production facility. Frames start as stainless steel blanks and are machined in pairs. You may have noticed the matching serial numbers on both sides of the frame in the pictures. This is purposely done as a quality control measure. I found the machining to be outstanding, with no visible tool marks, even inside the frame. The frame and barrel have both been treated to a beautiful matte black ISONITE finish by PARKER TRUTEC.

Reassembly of the barrel and frame requires positioning the barrel on the frame and pushing the barrel pivot pin through the barrel lug and into the left side of the frame, where it locks in place. Pushing down on the rear of the barrel allows the barrel locking lug to push the barrel release forward until it clears the locking notch. The massive under-barrel locking lug and barrel release block secure the barrel and frame during firing.

Front and rear sights are machined into the frame and barrel. The sights were suitable for the intended purpose of the pistol.

Front and rear sights are machined into the frame and barrel. The sights were suitable for the intended purpose of the pistol.

The sight system is machined into the frame and barrel. Each side of the frame has one rear sight half machined into it. When the two frame halves are joined together, the rear sight is formed. The front sight is machined into the top of the barrel. This low-profile sighting system is very robust and virtually impossible to damage.

The 3.25” barrel has a mixture of smooth bore and rifled sections ahead of the 45 Colt chamber.

The 3.25” barrel has a mixture of smooth bore and rifled sections ahead of the 45 Colt chamber.

Peering down the barrel, I was surprised to see how Heizer decided to treat the bore. Starting at the breech face, the 3.25 inch long barrel has 1.3 inches of 45 Colt chamber, followed by 1.45 inches of smooth bore, and finally .5 inch of rifling. I was curious to see how this bore configuration would handle various 45 Colt and .410 shotshell loads out on the range.

Heizer is very proud of the roller bearing trigger system, which does not require any lubrication. The trigger pulls straight back with a trigger stroke of approximately 4/10ths of an inch. The trigger weight progressively builds throughout the trigger pull and finally breaks at just over 12 pounds. The digital trigger pull gauge I have available is limited to 12 pounds and the PS1 trigger exceeded the capacity of the gauge on every test. While the exact pull weight is not known, the trigger “felt” consistent with each pull. The double-action design of the trigger allows for infinite restrike capability should you have a failure to fire with a round.

The spring loaded extractor easily lifts spent hulls and brass from the chamber. The massive under-barrel locking lug locks the barrel to the frame when firing.)

The spring loaded extractor easily lifts spent hulls and brass from the chamber. The massive under-barrel locking lug locks the barrel to the frame when firing.)

The PS1 has two more features that I think are worth mentioning. The first is a spring-loaded extractor that lifts the fired brass or hull clear of the chamber when you release the barrel. Lifting the fired brass or shotshell hull .17 inch above the chamber doesn’t sound like much, but I found it to be just enough to grab the brass or hull rim for easy removal. The last notable feature is the storage compartment located in the hollow grip of the PS1. The storage compartment holds two 45 Colt shells and is accessed by pulling down on the ribbed portion of the access door on the bottom rear of the grip. When closed, the access door is securely held in place by a ball detent mechanism.

The trigger stroke is approximately .4” and increases in weight as the trigger is pulled. The trigger breaks at over 12 lbs. and exceeded the maximum of the trigger pull gauge.

The trigger stroke is approximately .4” and increases in weight as the trigger is pulled. The trigger breaks at over 12 lbs. and exceeded the maximum of the trigger pull gauge.

Heading out to the range with a variety of .410 shotshell and 45 Colt ammunition, provided by Ammunition Depot, I put the PS1 to the test. As I worked through the various loads and targets, I was surprised by how pleasant the PS1 was to shoot. I believe the combination of total weight, low bore axis and ergonomic grip all played a part in the shooting experience. The only discomfort I had shooting the PS1 was during the chronograph testing while shooting from a rest.

The PS1 functioned flawlessly throughout the two trips it made to the range. There were no failures to fire or extract with anything I fed it. I did note the pistol shot about 3 inches above point of aim with 45 Colt ammunition out to 10 yards. Shotshell patterns were more true to point-of-aim, with the shotshell wad frequently hitting the target near the point of aim.

The Hornady Critical Defense 45 Colt 185 grain bullets displayed elongated holes at 10 yards which indicates instability and key-holing

The Hornady Critical Defense 45 Colt 185 grain bullets displayed elongated holes at 10 yards which indicates instability and key-holing

Winchester PDX 45 Colt 225 grain bullets cut clean holes in the target at 5 and 10 yards. Group sizes were also slightly smaller with this load.

Winchester PDX 45 Colt 225 grain bullets cut clean holes in the target at 5 and 10 yards. Group sizes were also slightly smaller with this load.

I discovered that 45 Colt ammunition selection may be important with the PS1. I had 185 grain and 225 grain loads available for testing. The lighter 185 grain loads cut elongated holes in the 10-yard targets, which indicated unstable bullet flight and key-holing. The 225 grain loads punched clean holes in the target at 10 yards with no indication of key-holing. As previously mentioned, only the last half inch of the PS1 barrel is rifled, and this may not impart enough spin on some bullets to allow stable flight.

Reviewing the PS1 was my first opportunity to experience the terminal performance of the new breed of .410 shotshells specifically designed for self-defense. Both the Hornady and Winchester loads consist of multiple projectiles of various profiles and weights. Both loads tested well in the PS1, delivering the majority of the projectiles to point of aim at five yards. If I were considering the PS1 for self-defense purposes, I might consider one of the multiple-projectile shotshells over a 45 Colt load.

Hornady Triple Defense .410 Shotshell worked well in the PS1 with all three projectiles landing in center mass.)

Hornady Triple Defense .410 Shotshell worked well in the PS1 with all three projectiles landing in center mass.)

Winchester PDX Defender .410 Shotshell also worked well with all 3 Defense Disks and most of the BBs landing in center mass.)

Winchester PDX Defender .410 Shotshell also worked well with all 3 Defense Disks and most of the BBs landing in center mass.)

I’ve read a few reviews of .410/45 revolvers, and one of the biggest complaints about the revolvers is that the rifling in the barrel has a tendency to adversely affect shot patterns with the light-weight size 6, 7.5, 8, and 9-shot pellets. Patterns end up looking like donuts, with nearly empty centers and dense outer rings. The PS1 barrel didn’t seem to have that problem. When patterning size 8 shot at 10 feet, the pattern was uniformly dense in the center with a sparse outer ring.

The PS1 is truly a pocket shotgun. Fully loaded and holstered, the 25.4 ounce package can be slipped in your pocket before you head out for a fishing trip, hike, or even to take your dog for a walk.

The PS1 is truly a pocket shotgun. Fully loaded and holstered, the 25.4 ounce package can be slipped in your pocket before you head out for a fishing trip, hike, or even to take your dog for a walk.

Prior to releasing the PS1, Heizer turned its staff loose with 20 cases of .410 shotshells and a single PS1. Three daysand 5,000 rounds later, the PS1 was still running strong and ready for more. At the top of the article, I mentioned that the PS1 is built like a tank. I’m not at all surprised the PS1 stood up to the 5,000-round endurance test. I think the people who buy a PS1 will have a pistol that will provide a life-time of service.

The Heizer PS1 is definitely a special purpose pistol for the outdoors person who values a compact platform over something with greater ammunition capacity. I’ve pocket carried the PS1 for several days in a Remora pocket holster and have become accustomed to the reassuring weight in my pocket. I really hope the PS1 sells well, because I really want to see what is on the drawing board for Heizer’s next firearm.

Hornady publishes a 920 fps muzzle velocity from a 3 inch test barrel for this load. The PS1 barrel demonstrated a much lower velocity.

Hornady publishes a 920 fps muzzle velocity from a 3 inch test barrel for this load. The PS1 barrel demonstrated a much lower velocity.

The hollow grip holds two rounds of 45 Colt ammunition. The access door is held in place by a ball detent when in the closed position.)

The hollow grip holds two rounds of 45 Colt ammunition. The access door is held in place by a ball detent when in the closed position.)

The Heizer Defense stylized grip texturing demonstrates the precision machining Heizer utilizes in manufacturing the PS1.

The Heizer Defense stylized grip texturing demonstrates the precision machining Heizer utilizes in manufacturing the PS1.

Winchester PDX Defender .410 Shotshell also worked well with all 3 Defense Disks and most of the BBs landing in center mass.

Ammunition Depot provided some of the most popular Personal Defense 45 Colt and 2.5″ .410 Shotshells from Hornady and Winchester for the review.

Dual chamber ports on both sides of the barrel allow visual inspection of the chamber without releasing the barrel.

Dual chamber ports on both sides of the barrel allow visual inspection of the chamber without releasing the barrel.

Reversing the snake target gives a better view of the pattern density and spread.

Reversing the snake target gives a better view of the pattern density and spread.

: At 10 feet, the obligatory snake target was shot with one round of Winchester AA Super Sport .410 #8 shot. The “snake” received several hits from the ½ oz. of shot.

: At 10 feet, the obligatory snake target was shot with one round of Winchester AA Super Sport .410 #8 shot. The “snake” received several hits from the ½ oz. of shot.

 

 

 

{ 68 comments }

{ 68 comments… add one }

  • derfel cadarn February 18, 2014, 6:35 am

    I have always been amused by the “snake gun” idea. If one is ten feet away from any snake, the snake is not a threat that cannot be more easily avoided. The .410/.45 Colt rounds offer poor protection from bears, .45 Colt may be loaded to capable round but potential recoil would be punishing at best. As a last ditch defense weapon this may have some use. I have no doubts about its qualities of construction and it will surely hold up for a lifetime from the six times the average shooter might fire this weapon. Over all this is an answer to a problem that should have been addressed sooner by a more appropriate weapon. If the situation arises and still is all you got, go with it, but I would say the same thing for a NAA mini revolver. The best solution to any problem is being prepared, I would suggest that this firearm is certainly better than nothing.

    • Clem March 1, 2014, 11:14 am

      The .45 round would be less punishing than the bear.

  • Al February 18, 2014, 1:11 pm

    This gun is reminiscent of the “Liberator” pistol but better made; and it’s robust and simple design should make it almost indestructible. But it also begs the question: If a single shot shotgun can sell for $80-$129, why should anyone pay more than $100-$200 for a single shot handgun? I wouldn’t pay more than $150 for it.

    • B. Brooks February 24, 2014, 11:09 am

      +1 I certanly would not pay more for any single shot pistol. Another drawback is that it will only chamber 2.5″ shells & not the 3″. If I wanted a small gun for protection from snakes I would buy an American Derringer or Bond Arms derringer chambered in 410. At least you have two shots & the 3″ mag 410 shells.

      Heizer came up with a good idea but didn’t think it out before putting the gun into production. They then flubbed up by over pricing it.

    • Rick February 26, 2014, 12:56 pm

      I agree. I think $100 is about the most I would spend on this.

    • TJ February 27, 2014, 10:58 am

      I totally agree, well made but overpriced.

  • wk February 24, 2014, 7:07 am

    Looks like something out of a 3D printer. What a joke!

  • MJF February 24, 2014, 7:35 am

    Aside from the serious collector with deep pockets…who is willing to pop $499 for a single shot handgun?

    • rogertc1 February 24, 2014, 8:17 am

      I Agree with MJF. As a collector. I hare a Double Tap in my collection that was the same price. I just see this derringer as a revenge pistol.

      From Heizer Defense’s press release …

      “In a continued effort to protect their product development and engineering efforts, Heizer Defense, LLC has filed a complaint in the United States District Court for ten counts.

      This includes declaration of inventorship and transfer of rights for patent No 8,495,831 and for the declaration of invalidity and unenforceability, or alternatively correction of inventorship and transfer of rights for design patent No. D686,685.

      We would expect the lawsuit to establish, among other things, that Charles Heizer, Founder of Heizer Aerospace, is an inventor for this patent.

      The defendants of the complaint are Doubletap Defense LLC, f/k/a Heizer Technologies, LLC; Central Holding Corp.; Raymond Kohout, and Marvin Dufner.”
      - See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2013/10/09/heizer-defense-files-lawsuit-doubletap-defense/#sthash.b6ac8PZM.dpuf

    • rogertc1 February 24, 2014, 8:23 am

      I agree as a collector I have a Double tap. The Heizer is just a revenge gun due to a lawsuit. When they hit the market..not yet out., I will get one.

      From Heizer Defense’s press release …

      “In a continued effort to protect their product development and engineering efforts, Heizer Defense, LLC has filed a complaint in the United States District Court for ten counts.

      This includes declaration of inventorship and transfer of rights for patent No 8,495,831 and for the declaration of invalidity and unenforceability, or alternatively correction of inventorship and transfer of rights for design patent No. D686,685.

      We would expect the lawsuit to establish, among other things, that Charles Heizer, Founder of Heizer Aerospace, is an inventor for this patent.

      The defendants of the complaint are Doubletap Defense LLC, f/k/a Heizer Technologies, LLC; Central Holding Corp.; Raymond Kohout, and Marvin Dufner.”

  • Ed February 24, 2014, 7:48 am

    Why would anyone design and market a single shot weapon of any type? There are plenty of firearms that provide multiple shots in a similar size platform.

    • Archduke Franz Ferdinand February 24, 2014, 3:33 pm

      I think the cal. .45 Long Colt is the point. Most small pistols aren’t chambered in rounds that big…

      My 1911 won’t cycle snake shot rounds. Then, again, I’ve never been close enough to a snake to justify spending $500 on a single shot pistol. (I live 4500+ feet above sea level, there are no snakes.)

      • Cynical February 24, 2014, 4:13 pm

        I live at 6800 feet and we have some big prairie rattlers. Usually not many and not a problem but the tree huggers are trapping prairie dogs and relocating them out here; so, we’ll see more of the rattlers in the next few years.

        • Rick February 26, 2014, 12:54 pm

          More prairie dogs means more target practice…

    • Steve February 24, 2014, 3:42 pm

      I’m with you on that one. One shot is not adequate for even a second tier defense weapon. 5 shot is my minimum.
      The stock is butt ugly too. No thanks.

  • KGBrown February 24, 2014, 8:39 am

    I see this as a novelty, and not something the average Joe would want. For self defense, I’d rather carry one of the small, lightweight .380′s available. They hold 6 more rounds than the P51, they’re lighter, and you can get one for much less.

  • KLC February 24, 2014, 8:52 am

    A $499, 21 ounce SINGLE SHOT pistol is an absurd concept! ……For the same price and weight, I could be carrying a Glock 26 or one of the Springfield XD series.

    A hunter, fisherman, or backpacker is going to want the most firepower for the least weight; …..And this just doesn’t “do it”!

    I too see this as only a collector’s novelty.

    KLC

  • Rattlerjake February 24, 2014, 9:20 am

    $499? Seriously? I can buy a good used 9mm for that. Besides, It’s a snake killer and they are my friends! LOL

    • Elkhunter February 24, 2014, 10:17 am

      I agree. I have never been pursued by a snake intent on doing me harm. Even at my advanced age I think I can still outrun a western diamondback.

      • R. Lowell February 24, 2014, 11:50 am

        I have been pursued by a snake. A cottonmouth will go out of his way to bite you. Interesting concept but find you a used Leinad derringer for 1/5 the price and it will do the same thing.

        • Elkhunter February 24, 2014, 4:30 pm

          Yeah, I forgot about cottonmouths. My Father is from Kentucky so I should have remembered his stories. Out here in Arizona the rattlers are less aggressive. The point being, if I have time to draw a handgun I am not really in any danger from a snake. I run into them all the time and just let them be. I like the fact they keep the rodent population down.

      • Rick February 26, 2014, 12:59 pm

        The point is not to get away from the snake. It’s to kill the snake around your house so it doesn’t strike a pet or loved one.

        • MysTaken1 February 27, 2014, 3:24 pm

          you can get trap-shoot ammo for a 22 rifle and have an inexpensive weapon for both snake and rodent protection in your yard.

  • The Bob Johnson February 24, 2014, 9:29 am

    $500 for a single shot pistol that has an effective range of a big stick is ridiculous. Average Joe has many better choices to spend hard-earned money on and big sticks are usually free.

  • Lee February 24, 2014, 9:41 am

    There is no such thing as a .410 gauge.

    • Bruce F. February 24, 2014, 10:44 am

      Lee, you are 100% correct that it is indeed .410 bore and not .410 gauge. Over time .410 gauge has become a generally accepted misnomer. Just look at any box of .410 shotshells from Winchester and you will see them labeled as .410 gauge. That doesn’t make it “right”, but it does make it easily understood by all.

  • BRS February 24, 2014, 9:46 am

    Yes, adopt a thumb forward grip, and put your finger alongside the muzzle. Bad picture guys.

  • Steve February 24, 2014, 9:57 am

    $150-200 should be max price; otherwise this pistol is not in my budget range.

  • Irish-7 February 24, 2014, 10:12 am

    I looked at the Double Tap .45 ACP, but did not buy one. I liked the versatility of the Bond derringer more, in that it fired both .410 GA and .45 Long Colt. Having storage for additional rounds is an advantage, though. I didn’t get either on account of the prices and the thought that at best, these tiny pistols are a back up to a back up. Anyway, I think Heizer would have been wiser to make their new model with 2 barrels. Realistically, most folks won’t spend 500 bucks on a single shot weapon. For the same amount, or less, you can purchase a Taurus Judge and have 5 round capability. I agree with the previous posts that assessed this gun as a novelty.

    • dan February 25, 2014, 12:04 am

      i bought a double tap in 9m shot it once took it back lost 88.00 but a piece of crap hurt my hand real bad,stay away from this crap

  • Stephen Pringle February 24, 2014, 10:28 am

    As a law enforcement officer, and firearms instructor/tactical weapons instructor, I am interested in the concept of a small, easily concealed but functional, backup or off-duty weapon to recommend to my students. From all I have heard and read about this “weapon”, I am convinced that this would make a good paperweight but a poor concealed=carry weapon.

  • Why? February 24, 2014, 10:39 am

    Pay $499 for a heavy bulky single shot .410…. Or pay $499 for a 5 shot Taurus Judge .410… This is a solution to a problem nobody has…

    • Rich Heipp February 24, 2014, 11:17 am

      Get the S&W Governor it has six round capacity .410 2 1/2″ .45 long colt & .45 acp. Lighter smaller more features and better benefits then the Taurus.

  • Arthur Morgan February 24, 2014, 10:58 am

    I have to agree with most of the others that $500.00 for a snake gun that you could take out with a Wamo slingshot with marbles or ball bearings Get the 380 instead I have the AMT Back-up all stainless steel and fits well in the back pocket

  • Rich Heipp February 24, 2014, 11:11 am

    Not a fan at all, they lost me when they said over twelve pound trigger pull. Do you think that may be the reason for the inaccuracy of this weapon or gut the grip the shooter was using. And how many times will you need to reload this thing after missing a snake??? at ten feet. For $499 L.M.A.O. what brand???

    I will stick to my S&W Governor with six round capacity and a choice of .410 2 1/2″ .45 long colt or .45 acp. Mix and match the rounds as you please. Its scandium alloy frame is extremely strong and very light weight accurate fun & easy to shoot. Hitting what I aim at well over 25 feet snake or rat and home defense is no problem. Easy trigger pull, double or single action. Tritium night sights are awesome. Small enough for conceal carry. I got all this and the S&W name brand and quality for only $699

  • Peter February 24, 2014, 12:20 pm

    This gun might well be better off with a smooth bore. Like the Taurus Judge, its a point blank gun. At 25 ft, the safest place to be is at point of aim for a Judge load with #6 shot or buck shot – the rifling spun the shot charge so much that no pellets hit center at 25 yds! The Heizer seems to put a few pellets on target at 10ft, but its not suited for small game or small varmints. Also, a 410 slug in a smooth bore would perform better and more effectively than a 45LC is a partially rifled barrel. I’d rather carry a 22 revolver. And the price is prohibitive. It reminds me of a sofa bed – not a great sofa and an even worse bed.

    • ej harb February 24, 2014, 12:56 pm

      with a judge and federals 410 000×4 load standing at 25 yeards point of aim would not be wise.i have several times got all 4 balls on the torso part of a silo on a area covered by a paperback book
      that’ll hurt!

      • WatchingAmericaDie February 24, 2014, 9:29 pm

        So have I. And 3 out of 4 on torso, about 60% of the time. That said, shooting .410 for self- defense – which IS its calling – the Judge is NOT DESIGNED for distances over about 7 yards; 10 yards max. Using specifically engineered FEDERAL Home Defense ammo, it is a STONE KILLER, in OOO buck at those distances. FAR from just a point blank weapon. Anyone who disagrees has not shot the Judge and studied the results, or is a pig-headed, KNOW-IT-ALL old school moron who listens to like-minded morons. Is it a snake gun? Yes. But it’s much more, and I stake my life on it regularly when I’m driving; it and my 12 ga. when I’m home. Yeah, ok. My back-up and (more and more often these days) primary, is an XDs .45…

        As for .45 LC, I can hit reasonably tight center mass pretty durn consistently at 20 yards. My buddy (who can SHOOT) can hit 4.5 of 5 center mass at 50 yds. from a 100 rd. box. All that poo you hear about gap from bullet to barrel is just that – poo – at 20 – 50 yds for a shooter. And anyone thinks .45 LC won’t kill ya DEAD needs to watch more John Wayne. Well… don’t we all?

  • Jack February 24, 2014, 12:22 pm

    How does this “short barreled shotgun” pas the governments scrutiny?

    • ej harb February 24, 2014, 12:38 pm

      rifled for part of bore makes it a “pistol” in batfe eyes

  • noel p. mellen February 24, 2014, 12:24 pm

    I have an Argentine single shot .410 based on what appears to be a Colt ’73 frame. It works fine and was out long before the Judges and others were made. I carried it for many years as I am not the snake affectionoto as some of the others that have responded. I replaced it more recently with a used Rossi .44 S&W revolver that someone had spent a great deal more than it deserved tuning it up. With snakeshot it is perfect and allows for errors that a single shot may not. It was a SS weapon and mostly it sits in the gunroom waiting to see if I’ll use it again. Both of these guns together with a great amount of ammunition did not add up to the $499.00 price tag. I imagine that the 23+ ounce weight and the 2 1/2 inch shell are designed to mitigate the recoil.

  • Jack February 24, 2014, 12:26 pm

    Interesting, but how does this “shotgun with a short barrel and short overall size pass the scrutiny of the government?

    • John February 24, 2014, 1:00 pm

      It shoots the 45 long Colt, as such, it’s a legal pistol. It just happens to also shoot .410.

  • ej harb February 24, 2014, 12:34 pm

    it looks like a modified altered double tap;fascinating!
    from a bit of looking about I find this company and double tap are in litigation in federal court over the patent.
    sounds like the designer/inventor and the people at double tap who make one of his inventions are locking horns
    perhaps similar to colt in the Patterson days?
    they are both kind of interesting weapons but at half a grand a iron not that interesting.
    another thought is 5000rds of 410 in 2.5 days? you can tell his employess by the sore right hands!
    I love 45acp and I used to handload 44mag for a ruger Alaskan that made the ground shake when it fired but 16 2.5 410 rounds from a American derringer rendered me unable to hold a pen and write for 18 hours

    • Dale February 25, 2014, 6:18 pm

      yes…I was smitten w/the double tap when I first saw it in print…then I handled one at a local gun store and saw what a piece of crap it really was! I’ll stick w/my pocket revolver or my pocket semi-auto., thank you very much, with a couple of extra re-loads I’ll have more than triple the fire power of the double tap or this single shot, over priced novelty gun.

  • Fran Dobscha February 24, 2014, 12:38 pm

    Regarding the available finish options: “Prison Pink”?

    • Steve February 24, 2014, 9:15 pm

      Yeah, me too. Nothing [good] comes to mind.

  • Rocky February 24, 2014, 1:33 pm

    A one shot pistol… no thanks ! I would rather a two shot derringer, in the same calibers, for a ‘pocket shotgun’.

    Better yet, I have a Taurus Judge Ultra-Light pistol. It’s bulky, but light enough to wear in a holster. It also takes nicely to .45 Colt speed loaders, as well as .410 speed strips ;~)

  • Luis Jr February 24, 2014, 1:36 pm

    We breed pigs, goats, sheep, etc. Single are not good for our ranch. I can place “snake loads” into my 38 special -6 shots or into my 357 8 shots. Why should I buy a single shot?
    http://www.NaplesRanch.com.

  • Bobby Williams February 24, 2014, 3:04 pm

    I agree with almost all the above. Too heavy, too expensive, too few rounds, too much competition. I have all the competitors mentioned above, the Heizer Defense PSI will be a hard sell. Better buy by far would be a flare gun with a .410 insert.

  • Bulva February 24, 2014, 3:15 pm

    I see 1 & only 1 use for this gun. You carry it in your pocket loaded with a 410 shell,1 & only 1 person tries to rob you. You reach in your pocket is if going for wallet & pull it out & fire from 2-3ft away. I think it would work quite well in that situation. But, to spend that money, & carry it for that 1 situation, seems a little rediculous. Though if ever happened, you’d regret you didn’t have it.
    As a few people said, maybe as a last ditch backup gun (though better options out there), but no doubt this was built simply as a revenge gun for the lawsuit.

  • Cynical February 24, 2014, 4:23 pm

    As a carry, I like my NAA .22 ‘get off me’ pistol. I don’t expect a gunfight at 30 yards but a mugger at 30″. If I put 5 .22 hollowpoints in him he’ll forget why he tried to attack me. As for really hurting someone, my 1911A1 (1943) will serve that purpose. The in between .357 and .380 are just for fun and, as the Marines found out, 9mm won’t stop some attackers and that’s why they’ve ordered a boatload of 1911′s.

    • Cynical February 24, 2014, 4:26 pm

      My favorite snake gun is an old Springfield single shot .410. It’s the size of a BB gun and easy to carry in the mini-truck out in the pasture.

  • Dr. G February 24, 2014, 4:24 pm

    Another over priced toy that will for sure flop !! There is NO way that it is worth $499.00. There are plenty of alternatives available in the market for less money. Sorry HD. Not with my hard earned money !!

    • Elkhunter February 24, 2014, 6:26 pm

      I will just stick with my ancient SW 6904 at about the same weight with 14 rounds of 9mm. I am pretty sure I can hit something eventually. Cost me $285.

  • Smoke Hill Farm February 24, 2014, 6:56 pm

    An overpriced toy that has far less utility than many cheaper — and more suitable — uses.

    While I admire snakes greatly & have kept several as pets, I won’t permit poisonous ones near my campsite or anywhere near my dogs, who don”t know to leave them alone. I’ve had three dogs bitten on my farm, and even though dogs have a much higher pain tolerance than humans the results can be terrible, unless it’s a “dry bite” by a copperhead.

    I also kill all cottonmouths on my Virginia farm — too aggressive & too dangerous. I ignore copperheads since they are far less risky & relatively shy by comparison. However, I will kill the occasional copperhead that comes within about 75 yards if the house or my dog yards. My old diabetic legs have enough circulatory issues, and even a copperhead bite could easily result in amputation.

    I carry snakeshot as the first round in my Ruger .357, with a couple of spares in my pocket and it works great on snakes & most other nearby pests. No chance I’d blow 500 bucks on a single-shot novelty gun.

  • John February 24, 2014, 7:48 pm

    At half that price and a few beers in me, I might be interested.

  • ED February 24, 2014, 8:54 pm

    $500 bucks for one of the ugliest least engineered, most ridiculous design of a SINGLE shot, really heavy rocks I’ve ever seen…I really don’t think so..SHEESH are we ALL becoming sheeples in stupids colothing??

  • spike February 24, 2014, 9:28 pm

    What a joke? You can buy the XDS .45 or 9 for that price. And a single shot gun other than Quigley’s Rifle is a waste of money. I agree with all the prior posts. What was this company thinking?

    • Elkhunter February 26, 2014, 2:14 pm

      Quigley. Heehee. Good idea, I can shoot the snake from the next hill. Oh that’s right, I am a lousy shot. Anyway, enjoyed the comment.

  • Eric AFFA February 25, 2014, 2:11 pm

    I like the idea of the quick shot with it I own 2 judges and a bond arms and I love them I think I’ll add it to my collection it will look great with my 9mm double tap

    • Dale February 25, 2014, 6:07 pm

      Hey, it’s your money! I sure won’t be spending my hard earned cash on this piece of crap! To many viable options already on the market at less than half the price. Or – I’ll just carry one of my short barreled revolvers loaded w/snake shot, like some of the prior posts also stated.

      • Eric affa February 25, 2014, 8:25 pm

        I just like shotguns I have guns from a 870 to a K-80 and it’s just one more to play with but I won’t pay $500 I should be able to get it for about $350 and I’ll be good with that

  • Al February 26, 2014, 12:27 am

    I have used a derringer with the similar feature,shoring the long cold you need to hold the gun very tight or you may lose it.i don’t remember the name but it will shoot up to3 1/2 410 shel and cost about $500

  • loupgarous February 27, 2014, 9:57 am

    A handsomely-packaged, well-made answer to a question nobody asked.

    CCI makes shot shells in most popular handgun calibers, including, surprisingly, the .40 S&W. If you’re going to spend five hundred dollars anyway, spend it on something like a small-frame XD40, load one of the clips with snake shot, the other with hollowpoints, for bigger game – like two-legged snakes, the ones Attorney-General Holder wants to put on the protected list.

  • Austin February 28, 2014, 6:22 pm

    It looks to me to have just more use than the FP-45 Liberator. At least this will handle .410 bore shotshells and is more than a bit more durable.

    You have better options for every purpose than this little pistol, even if you do not like the Judge or Governor. A Bond Arms derringer will give you one more shot at that snake in a package roughly the same size, and a Thompson Center/Contender will be more accurate for target shooting if you insist upon using a single shot pistol. It has “interesting” going for it, all right. $500 worth of Interesting? Hmm… I doubt that it will sell well, but I admit that I want to look one over in person.

  • Desert Sands March 30, 2014, 11:07 am

    Why not just get a 45 long colt SA revolver and throw some snake load cartridges in your tackle box? Or a Charter Arms 44 special bull dog? Snake loads available for that too. Better yet just leave the snake alone. They won’t hurt you if just avoid them.

  • Ronald Higginbotham June 15, 2014, 8:53 pm

    Is this gun legal in california?

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