Ring Steel in the Roaring ’20s With a New Colt Python

Colt’s bringing back the Python. Say goodbye to safe queen status! (Photo: Colt)

For more information on the new and improved Python, visit Colt.com.

In 2020 we expect to see a lot of great products hit the market but few guns will put more smiles on faces than the return of the Colt Python. Chambered for .357 Magnum, the new Colt Python has a 6-round capacity and comes in two barrel length options.

The new Colt Python is offered with a high-polish stainless steel finish and either a 4.25-inch or 6-inch barrel. Both come with walnut grips that bear the Colt medallion. These updated versions of the Colt Python have a few changes to differentiate them from the old snake guns but they maintain the classic looks and operation of the originals.

The classic grip pattern, boxy frame, generous trigger, ribbed topstrap, and full-length underlug are all just as they should be. Both models are double- and single-action with a spurred hammer.

Colt redesigned the Python in order to reinforce the frame at the top where it gets stressed the most under fire to make it even more durable. According to Colt, the top of the frame has 30 percent more steel in it by cross-section.

As a result. Colt modified the sights. The rear sight is still a fully adjustable target sight, which is standard for full-size revolvers, and the front sight can be changed by the user like on the new Colt Cobras.

Colt is teasing other models with different barrel lengths and finishes. (Photo: Colt)

Colt doesn’t want these to be safe queens, they’re meant to be shot. Along with the stronger frame, these Colt Pythons have recessed target crowns for improved accuracy no matter what they’re being used for. Chambered for .357 Magnum they can withstand a lifetime of full-power loads and can be used with light .38 Special rounds when teaching new shooters or just relaxing at the range.

The starting weight for the 4.25-inch model is 42 ounces. It is 5.5 inches tall, 1.55 inches wide and 9.75 inches long. The 6-inch model will be 11.5 inches long and weigh around 46 ounces.

The big question is how much will these cost? Colt lists the MSRP at $1,499. It’s no doubt that these will sell close to, at, or possibly over full price when the first batch hits the streets.

The price is fair. Sure, it’s higher than other popular brands of full-size revolvers, but it’s not at the upper end of the price range for premium revolvers and it’s competitive with and even less than what used Colt Cobras sell for on GunsAmerica.

Colt is launching with a 4.25-inch and a 6-inch model. (Photo: Colt)

See Also: Colt Announcing World War I-Era 1911 Black Army

In other words, Colt could sell the new Python for less, but they could also sell it for more, so in the end, it’s probably priced just right. The new Colt Cobras are a little more affordable for people who just need a new Pony.

The new Pythons are definitely the sort of guns that will go with you to the range every time you head out this year, and probably also next year and the year after that … But they’re also serious shooters.

With the Cobra series Colt has tested their new revolver designs and took their time to make sure that the Python launch was going to be solid. It’s safe to say that these Pythons want to be shown off, but they also want to shoot in competitions, they also want to take game, and they want to do all the things people stopped doing with Pythons when they became collector pieces.

So the only question that remains is, do you want to buy this Python, or do you think you can wait until they come out with one in blue? We certainly can’t wait to see what other models of Python Colt has in the works.

For more information on the new and improved Python, visit Colt.com.

***Buy and Sell on GunsAmerica! All Local Sales are FREE!***

About the author: Max Slowik is a writer with over a dozen years of experience and is a lifelong shooter. He has unwavering support for the Second Amendment and the human right to self-defense. His ambition is to follow Thomas Paine, as a journalist by profession and a propagandist by inclination.

{ 101 comments… add one }
  • OTTO ANDERSON JR November 28, 2020, 10:57 am

    WELL ITS BEEN ABOUT A YEAR SO WHERE IN HELL IS THE COLTS PYTHON S AT ? S W HAS NO PROBLEMS GETTING THERE WEAPONS OUT OR THE REST GETTING THERE WEAPONS OUT ON THE MARKET I GUESS SAM COLD MAYBE CLOSE DOWN. A SHAME AS I BEEN WAITING ALL THIS TIME . ITS A SHAME COLT. BIG SHAME

  • OTTO ANDERSON JR April 16, 2020, 11:51 am

    WELL ITS APRIL 2020 AND STILL NO COLT PYTHON S TO BE HAD . MAYBE NEXT YEAR IF WE STILL AROUND. COLT NEEDS TO GET OFF THERE BUTTS . AS I TIRED OF WAITING. ,

  • OTTO ANDERSON JR February 9, 2020, 10:54 am

    WELL ITS FEB AND STILL NO COLT PYTHON TO BE FUND. SO I WOUNDER WHEN THEY ARE GOING TO START SENDING THEM OUT. THIS IS NOT GOOD. HAVING TOWAIT SO DAM LONG. SO THEY NEED TO GET OFF THERE ASS .AND SEND THEM OUT

  • OTTO ANDERSON JR February 2, 2020, 8:15 am

    WELL NOW WATCH OUT AS I WAS TOLD THE OTHER DAY THAT SOME COLT PYTHONS ARE UP FOR SALE THE OLD ONE AND GOING FOR $2,800 DOLLARS HA AND THAT THE NEW ONES DON’T WORK GOOD SOME THING WRONG WITH THEM. ? THEY ARE TRYING TO MAKE SOME MONEY ON THE OLD ONES SO THEY CAN BUY THE NEW ONES. I GUESS AS IHAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR ONE NO ONE HAD ONE FOR SALE BUT NOW THEY DO. ?? I WAIT TILL THE NEW ONES GETS HERE. WHEN EVER THAT MAY BE . ANY ONE OUT THERE WITH THE NEW ONE YET ?

  • OTTO ANDERSON JR January 9, 2020, 3:12 pm

    HET BUDD. I AM A RETIRED POLICE OFFICER. AND MY WEAPON WAS A COLT PYTHON AND WAS ALL WAY THERE FOR ME NEVER BRAKING DOWN LIKE MY S W DID.. I HAD A BROTHER WITH STICKIE FINGERS WHOM TOOK IT AND SOLD IT. AND KIE,D ABOUT IT AND THE POLICE IN THE STATE OF IOWA WOULD NOT DO ANY THING AS HE WAS FAMILEY. AND I HAVE BEEN SICK ABOUT IT. WELL HE DIE,S A COUPLE WEEKS AGO. SO GOD TOOKCARE OF HIM. AND IF I EVER FIND A DEALER I WILL REPLACE IT SO I WILL FEEL SO MUCH BETTER. WHEN RTHAT IS DONE. THIS TIME I WILL GET ME 2 OF THEM A 4,25 INCHES AND A 6 INCHES. . THEY ARE SO SMOOTH LIKE NO OTHER GUN. THANKS ALL OTTO

  • Michael J January 8, 2020, 6:38 pm

    Leave it to California to ban a revolver. I suppose that Colt will have to pay the CADOJ blood money and drop test each barrel length Python, because we need to prevent criminals from accidentally shooting themselves with a $1500.00 gun. Dropping a Colt Python onto the concrete makes me cringe.

  • OTTO ANDERSON JR January 5, 2020, 9:22 am

    DAM THE COLT IS BACK AND NO ONE KNOWS WHERE I CAN GET MINE ALL MY PYTHON WAS STOLEN AND COULD NEVER GET IT BACK. AND I HAVE BEEN W/O .. MY PYTHON . AND IT NEVER LET ME DOWN. SO ANY ONE OUT THER THAT KNOWS WHERE THEY AR AT . LET ME KNOW. AS COLT IS NOT TELLING ANY ONE WHERE THEY ARE AT

  • Ted Deacon January 4, 2020, 6:54 pm

    I won 6 consecutive Registered NRA State Championships , and had 5 fop 10 finishes in Bianchi Cup. I never once saw a Colt Python in PPC or Bianchi, unless they shot for Colt-and had no choice. There is a reason for that.

    • Irish-7 January 6, 2020, 1:01 am

      WOW! I would have lost a bet on that. A friend from our gun club bought a Python back in the early 1980’s. He said it was ultra accurate “right out of the box”. What was the most common revolver used during those competitions, Smith & Wesson? Ruger?

    • Bill Lee January 26, 2020, 2:17 am

      Ted Deacon, I remember you! Hope you’re still shooting these days. Too bad Bianchi matches died a gruesome death in So Cal, and no one else but me and a few others witnessed it. Too many spray and prayers too chicken to do anything else but IDPA and IPSC. 🙁 You take care sir.

  • Budd January 4, 2020, 1:15 pm

    I bought a 6″ Python in Royal Blue for my dad back in the mid 70’s. Mounted a Phantom pistol scope on it, with a mount made by Bushnell specially for the Python. had a special holster made for it to be carried in. The plan was to go hunting with my dad, him sporting his Python and me with my Marlin .35 for a back-up. He passed away from wounds he received in WWII, before we ever got to do that. So the Python was given back to me by my mother. It hasn’t had 100 rounds fired through it, and I never carried it for a service weapon. In the days of LE revolvers, both service revolvers I carried (We provided our own in those days.) were S&W, basically because I knew they would be taking a beating, having to fight drunks and dopers, or some robber who didn’t like prison. My model 10-4 and model 19 did what they were supposed to do, but neither of them had the smoothness or feel (That trigger sound unlike any other.) of the Python. But I always felt that using that as a service weapon, (IMO Rick from the Walking Dead was a jerk.) would almost be blasphemy. So now it’s become an heirloom item, like a painting by Rembrandt or something. I still have a S&W .38,and Colt Series 70 Mk IV, but now carry a FS92. It just seems strange, after carrying .38’s and .45’s, to “upgrade?” to a 9mm. And to those that don’t think the Python was something special, I’ll say this; “You’ll never know what you have missed, if you never had one.”

    • Ken Blair January 5, 2020, 1:37 pm

      First, let me say I’m sorry for the loss of your father. As for the Python, I’m glad you kept it safe and clean and decided Not to use it as a service weapon. Though I sure you would have preferred it over the Smith (or probably anything else). My very first firearm of any type that I purchased for myself, back when I was 18 years old, was a nickel plated Colt Python 38 special “Target” version with an 8″ barrel. During my states Bullshit waiting period before I could pick up my gun, I had the cylinder sleeves lengthened to accept 357 mag. (I was able to do this because at the time of the purchase, I worked at the gun shop where I purchased this awesome piece of American workmanship. And because we had a well know gunsmith that came into our shop regularly, I was able to convince the store manager to let the gunsmith do the work during the waiting period). I’ve had this awesome weapon ever since. It has gone on many hunting trips over several years. However when I learned that Colt stopped making the Python, it kinda became a “Safe Gueen”, with a few ventures out into the world when I needed a fix from this wonderful friend that knew just what I needed, and when I needed it. This weapon has been with me longer than ANY girlfriend, and all 3 of my wives…and far more loyal. It’s definitely a keeper.

  • Bill konopk January 3, 2020, 9:28 pm

    Where is the anaconda

  • John Boutwell January 3, 2020, 9:21 pm

    I have owned 3 Pythons since 1973, a 4″ nickel , a 6″ blue and for the last 25 + years a polished 4″ stainless steel. They have all been very accurate guns and beautiful to boot. Never one to keep a safe queen, I will put a couple dozen rounds thru it every month and all my gun guy friends are in love with it after they shoot it. I will be in line for a new 6″ in the near future.

  • Area52 January 3, 2020, 4:42 pm

    Does anyone think H&K will bring back it’s H&K P7m8 or M13 ?

  • larry willman January 3, 2020, 3:34 pm

    Waited so many years and nothing. Now i’m so happy with my Ruger SP100 it hardly seems worth even getting interested.

  • Eric January 3, 2020, 3:00 pm

    Interesting thoughts. I’d like to add some thoughts.

    I carry a gun every day for a living and have for 35 years. I have carried revolvers, and semi autos. Have kept shotguns, rifles and full autos in my car for many of those years as a tactical unit member and K9. I don’t consider my self an expert, but I have opinions. You are free to have yours. For those of you that never had a failure, I’m very pleased for you. For me, my personal experience is this… I have apparently been on a range enough in my years that I’ve seen everything fail. Everything. I share this background so you can decide if you wish to give my thoughts any weight. So here is one more opinion.

    I’m excited that the python is back.

    I own two legacy Pythons. I saved and saved so I could buy them. I love to shoot them, hold them, let others shoot them. I love showing them off. I have never had anyone deny one thing. They are a symbol of and an example of quality, craftsmanship and excellence. They are in my mind beautiful and I love owning them. If (when?) I have $1500 dollars of unobligated cash, I might buy another.

    I love the idea that another generation of firearms enthusiasts has a more affordable opportunity to own their own python, without having to resort to finding the right legacy Python in an expensive market. I hope that these new Pythons are beautiful and smooth and lovely (yes…I think they are lovely) as today’s technology can produce. I hope the market supports these new models, I hope many shooters get to enjoy these guns half as much as I have. If some choose to carry them, I hope they get home every night, and never have to use them to defend their lives. If they must, I’m comfortable that they will be well served by the equipment. Please train, become expert, prepare yourself for this ultimate contest. This preparation has more to do with coming home, than any shortcoming of the equipment.

    For those of you that think these Pythons are worth the price…you are correct. I’m one of you…I agree.
    For those that think they are not worth the price…you are also right. If you won’t appreciate owning and shooting them, they won’t be worth the price to you. Find what you will be happy and comfortable with…then train. I’ll be he first to tell you you made the right decision.

    I hope my thoughts added to the discussion. And perhaps generated positive insight.

  • Charlemagne January 3, 2020, 2:33 pm

    It’s a gorgeous gun and I would really like to have one. But as I am less than wealthy I would like to know how much if any better is it than a GP100 with custom grips and a trigger job?

    • Eric January 4, 2020, 10:24 pm

      This is this the panicle of manufacturing excellence. You will be satisfied,

  • Tenbones January 3, 2020, 10:59 am

    Let’s see….with the Python back in production the value of my ’80’s vintage Python will probably decrease considerably, about the price of a new one I’m guessing. So in affect, I’ll be paying double if I buy a new one. 🙁

    • Don January 3, 2020, 1:12 pm

      You’re old Python will still hold its value. The new Python wont compare in quality. It may drive the price up, as the disappointment sets in.

      • Jake January 3, 2020, 3:08 pm

        I would politely disagree. The Pythons, at least those made during the UAW Union era at Colt were garbage, plagued with improper heat treatments and the sloppy UAW attitude of the day. I saw one which became unshootable after 1,500 rounds, less than 100 of which were factory magnum loads. The rest were .38 target loads. I have laughed at the folks rushing to pay thousands for these old clunkers. I would like to buy one of these new improved versions. No denying they are fine looking and feel good in hand.

  • Floyd January 3, 2020, 10:32 am

    Slim is a moron probably does not own one nice thing!

  • russ January 3, 2020, 10:29 am

    I have to admit I love revolvers …not to carry but for fun at the range. I am only asking your opinion on this ….is it that much better then S&W. I just got a 586 ,4in 357 for 700.00 and its a beauty….it is more accurate then I am at 65 yo. Is the Colt worth double the price? ….lol dont beat me up too bad

    • nick ball January 3, 2020, 12:28 pm

      Much as I wanted a Python and more so as I viewed the picture, I confess to thinking when I saw the price how can this really be much better than my 7 shot S&W 686 plus which is a fantastic revolver in its own right and which when I bought it about 10 years ago was about $450 if my memory serves me correctly.

      • russ January 3, 2020, 3:29 pm

        Nick—I totally agree….S&W revolvers are pretty damn good…..have a great New Year

    • Kim Elsey January 3, 2020, 5:45 pm

      I sold my mid-80’s Colt Python 6″ and purchased a S&W 586 first-gen. 6″ with partridge sites approx. 20 years ago. I think that the 586 is much better for me as the grip angle is more comfortable and it is just as accurate as the Python at 1/2 of the price.

      The bluing on my 586 is great but not as deep and high-polished like my mid-80′ Python.

      Also, I was always concerned that I might scratch the Python bluing, which was beautiful and I think of the Python as more of a trophy gun.

    • Awesome Bill brom Dawsonville January 3, 2020, 7:33 pm

      I own several Pythons and quite a few Performance Center Smith’s. From an aesthetic perspective, nothing’s prettier than a Python. But, with a good trigger job, a new Smith can be just as smooth as a well worn Python without the cost. My only complaint about the new Smith’s are the God awful Hillary holes on the side of their receivers. But if Colt can make a revolver without them, just maybe Smith will finally take a hint and delete them too.

  • Super X January 3, 2020, 9:47 am

    Have you ever had a case separate in camber? That happen to me and I depended on the old Colt 45 for years in the service and out . After that happen i only carry a revolver. I will never trust a automatic again. It is a good thing it was not in a emergency situation.

    • Don January 3, 2020, 12:18 pm

      I had a case separate in a S&W M19. It locked up the gun. It took two people to open the cylinder. It was Remington ammo. What bothered me was it was the second round in my duty gun and I had been packing that ammo for a couple of months. I would have been screwed in a gunfight.

      • Joe Frechette```````````````````````` January 3, 2020, 10:11 pm

        My money is on defective ammo in both cases.

      • Richie September 25, 2020, 3:29 pm

        The s/w mod 19 is well well made gun. I’m trying to figure out what went wrong?, I have a model 27 made in 1956. I would trust both models in any situation, thank you for your services as a police officer…. take care”

  • Kennneth Roseman January 3, 2020, 9:37 am

    I love that the trigger action is only 7.25-9lbs which is similar to the Cobra’s and that we may get a the trigger pull Colt is famous for. With all the revival in revolvers, their closest revolver competitor still can’t figure out why they aren’t selling their revolvers and sticks to an archaic trigger pull of 12 lbs DA and 4.5-5 lbs by Corporate policy. I’ll gladly pay the premium for the Colt.

  • TOM January 3, 2020, 9:34 am

    I’ve had a couple Pythons & they were good guns, but the S&Ws fit me better & I like the ergonomics of the Smiths better. Don’t think there has ever been a better .357 than the M27.

    • Billy January 4, 2020, 11:06 am

      Love my 5″ 627 Performance Center. 8 shots is always better than 6 and it fits my hand like a glove. That said, The new Python is gorgeous piece of steel artwork. I might not be able to resist buying one.

  • Jeffrey W Linley January 3, 2020, 8:46 am

    I was telling my crack dealer(FFL) that I thought that Colt should reintroduce the Python, and lo and behold! Nicely done, it is truly about time that Colt got serious again. I don’t really like revolvers, but I still have 15, and I think soon enough, I’ll have 16. Again, nicely done!

  • Jcs January 3, 2020, 8:44 am

    Good deal, bring all the Colts back, not a polymer fan. If you can hit your target with six rounds why you need 19 rounds?

    • Tom January 3, 2020, 11:34 am

      Come on Anaconda in 44 Magnum!

    • Michael Stilinovich January 5, 2020, 3:53 am

      Just in case there is seven of them.

  • John m January 3, 2020, 8:40 am

    They will never be as good as the original one’s are!! Just my 2 cents!

    • No1hunter January 3, 2020, 10:17 am

      Why?

      Sounds like it will be better. Just my 2 cents

    • nick ball January 3, 2020, 12:32 pm

      There is no reason why they couldn’t be better if they are made with modern machinery and materials, it just comes down to whether they they make the effort to do so. At $1400 or so they certainly should be top notch and need to be so compared to the competition, but who knows in today’s world what the end product will be. No matter what they produce there will still be many saying they are not as good as the old ones as happens with S&W products.

  • John Johnson January 3, 2020, 7:35 am

    I will hold off until the 6” blue is released.

    • EJM January 3, 2020, 8:33 am

      Ditto….

      • Don January 3, 2020, 12:23 pm

        It is cheaper to make a stainless gun. I suspect this is simply an old Trooper III or V with a fancy barrel. If that is what it is, it isn’t a $1500 revolver. Colt doesn’t know how to make the Python anymore. Then again the original Pythons shot out of time too fast.

        • Jake January 3, 2020, 3:15 pm

          The cylinder center ovals out on the crane because of lazy UAW workers not heat treating them properly. In that era the 1911’s and AR-15’s were sloppy made garbage as well. I believe it was when Colt was owned by Sunstrand.

  • Ratrod January 3, 2020, 6:19 am

    Think I will wait for a snubby in blue!

  • Allen January 3, 2020, 6:08 am

    Its nice to see the Colt Python back in production and According to the youtube video the Colt Rep sayed that they have ship thousands of Colt Python’s out. Colts web sight says “OUT OF STOCK” , they did the same thing with the Cobra Line. I would love to Have one but It seems that Colt is playing Games , Either you have them our you don’t. If you have Shipped Thousands were are they? The Distributor are being tight lipped if they have them the few that I spoke with said they wished they had them. Is Colt waiting for a particular Date and Stocking up the Distributors to have the Big Release? Are is this just a Marketing ploy to boost sales and our price? If you are a Colt Follower this is like finding a modern holy grail with the release of the Python, Come on Colt you can are should be doing better than this. Just my thoughts and I’m sure that some of what I have said will upset the Colt loyalist but at the end of the day it is what it is.

    • Bill January 3, 2020, 9:30 am

      Your device needs spellcheck.

    • Alan January 3, 2020, 12:15 pm

      It needs ‘English Grammar Check’, too.

    • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:53 am

      Huh???

  • Slim January 3, 2020, 6:06 am

    Who honestly cares? Anyone still carrying a wheel ugh is just hilarious to me! Even for back up. Then first comeby is it’s a back up gun and always needs to work. Yeah, that’s a crap argument. Ever seem a GLOCK for example with a slide that’s loose and flops all over or any other part in the gun?! Me neither! But I’m sure if you’ve been around guns for a while have seen a friend carrying the most sorry wheel gun we’ve ever seen. I know I’ve seen these supposed “never fail” wheel guns with the wheel portion so loose it rattles and the owner even kept the hammer from resting on the primer by dropping the hammer literally between two of the love cases. Meaning there was more than enough slop to move it to a position it should never sit in! So tell me how a wheel gun is more reliable than a GLOCK or one of the many other very reliable semi autos made in the last HUNDRED YEARS. And yeah I get nothing last forever especially these days when everything is made to be replaced every few years, but just MY OPINION wheel guns are just for fun and should never ever be used for anything except range day. Who really wants a super low capicity pistol that takes forever to load?! And yes, I know they make so called speed loaders and all I have to say to that is “does it hold 17 rounds of 9mm or 15 or 10mm?” “No?” Sad all these people with hundreds of thousands in CNC of not millions and they pump out the same crap as was made a hundred years ago in a hot factory by some poor guy getting paid cents per hour at best since that was the best THEY could do! But civilization now is leaps and bounds ahead and we’re still building lame 100 guns! If it was so great, they’d of never stopped making it! They still make the 1911 right? And that to should go by the way side as fifty million components is just plain stupid if you think logically. What’s the benefit of way over engineering a gun with so many tiny parts that if not all perfectly installed of course makes the gun have issues or most likely not work at all. Who’d want to take apart all those pieces to properly… Properly clean the gun? And sure I’ll hear from others saying it doesn’t need to be torn down to the last pin or what ever. Sure, if you don’t want it truly cleaned and sure to fail you one day! I totally get it’s hard to come up with new operating systems to build a gun around, but making copies of others hard work that did do all that in a time where everything was hand built and then for us to slap it into a CNC and let it do the majority of the work is to myself kind of disrespectful to the OG builders. What I call “True Gunsmiths.” Our future is agreed of us, not a hundred years ago! So why not think about the gun not if tomorrow but giddy years from now like the guys a hundred years ago and more did abs created some truly advanced weapons for their time. Think ahead people!

    • Kb31416 January 3, 2020, 7:01 am

      Blah, blah, blah, blah….
      So to summarize, the market for the new python is smaller by one when we subtract you. Thank you. That increases my ability to get one.

      • John B January 3, 2020, 8:22 am

        A glock will fail before a quality revolver

        • Don January 3, 2020, 12:31 pm

          I would disagree with that. I have shot and seen shot many revolvers to the point of needing a rebuild. My Glock service pistol went 33,000 rounds and it was still going strong. I’ve seen Pythons, S&W M19, 15, 29 and most of the stainless S&Ws and just about every DA Colt needing service. Original Pythons wore out fast using .357 ammo.

          • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:13 am

            Does that include my 1960s production Python with over 4000 rounds fired and still works like new? Glocks are great as deep lake fishing weights, but ANY Automatic becomes a tough to load single-shot if you lose the magazines!

    • Tex January 3, 2020, 8:39 am

      Wow…..Do you ever run out of steam? You”re entitled to your opinion but in my opinion your have a very narrow view of handguns. Why do you refer to wheel guns as “crap”? I have an answer: because you’re ignorant and overly opinionated. If the world in general operated with your “logic” we wouldn’t have vehicles with manual transmissions, candles would be used for birthday cakes only and all airplanes would have jet engines. I have a good idea……why don’t you go back to whatever gun store you trade with, get a cup of coffee and bore the counter staff with your vast amount of what you would refer to as knowledge. Thankfully gun manufacturers do indeed “think ahead”.

      • Roger Kaufman January 3, 2020, 11:33 am

        Very well said! I think I’ll buy two now!
        One less “Democratic” gun owner! 🤣

    • Dick Cheney January 3, 2020, 8:44 am

      Another moron full of hot air who has probably never handled a revolver in his life. What a joke!

    • srsquidizen January 3, 2020, 8:55 am

      Have 3 Glocks which I clean religiously after every trip to the range regardless of rounds fired. All 3 have been known to jam. While ammo may have been a contributing factor, a jam is a jam. OTOH, my inherited 1950’s Chief Special has never, ever failed to fire even with the crappiest range ammo and it only gets open-cylinder cleaning after a range trip, very rarely a disassembly. Yes, I do carry a semi-auto more often than a revolver but it’s definitely NOT because of the “reliable” factor. For reliability I’d trust my black-powder 1858 replica over any bottom feeder in the safe but then a G43 is a helluva lot easier to hide in your clothes.

      Wheel guns still have more than adequate firepower for civilian personal defense situations IF the civilian carrying it knows what they’re doing. Doesn’t matter what kind of gun Mr. Wilson had when he stopped that nutcase in church. One head shot, threat eliminated. At his skill level this new Python would have had enough .357 magnum rounds left in it to drop 5 more maniacs. It is still a formidable weapon.

    • ronald gaudier January 3, 2020, 8:58 am

      Does it occur to you that some people just prefer revolvers? For one, I handload and don’t like having to chase my brass all over the place. For two, if we both show to the range with a box of ammo and two empty guns, I can probably get through that box faster than you with your auto. Revolvers are easier to load, unload, and determine if they are empty. Another plus at the range. But then again, I’ll never be able to convince “operators” like you… LOL

      • Jonathan Schale January 5, 2020, 9:52 am

        I own 2 Revolvers… A .44 and a .357. I am excited to see this coming back. Though I own two Semi-Auto hand guns, I prefer to shoot my Revolvers over them. I will be getting in line to acquire one of these to see how it compares to the original Python. I have never been able to own one of the originals, but I shot a friends many, many times and was quite impressed.

        • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:48 am

          Thumbs Up!

    • coltsforlife January 3, 2020, 9:03 am

      so their are guys who cant afford to keep their guns up.
      i get it. groceries gas mamma, kids etc.
      i have been their. priorities change.
      but the nagging question of which type of gun or weapon is best is up to your skill level.
      it doesn’t matter what your using, revolver, switch blade, bow , rifle . if you can’t hit your mark on the first shot , your probably going to be dead long before you get a second or a 22nd round off..
      i really like the Springfield line up right now( XDM’s).
      the glock’s i keep trying to find room for,just don’t suit my grip or sight window. they will never shoot point of aim for me. very important understated concern.
      i prefer revolvers overall. mine all fit me well for their dedicated purposes.
      my everyday carry is a revolver…sp101..since the early 90’s. it hits whatever I’m looking at every time.

      • Don January 3, 2020, 12:37 pm

        If you are right handed and the Glock shoots low left, it is your shooting technique. Same if left handed and you hit low right. You’re milking the grip. It is the most common shooting mistake I see people make.

    • Rattlerjake January 3, 2020, 9:11 am

      Someone with your pisspoor command of English obviously hates a quality product.

      My only complaint with the new python is the ridiculous cost!

      • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:46 am

        AGREED!

    • kimberpross January 3, 2020, 9:20 am

      How old are you? Talking like a youngster who never had the chance to fire a Python and appreciate the smooth trigger and superb accuracy not to mention appreciating the beauty.

      • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:45 am

        AMEN!

    • DWF85936 January 3, 2020, 9:29 am

      Wow! I guess some opinions and interests are more important than those of others. Some of us appreciate the mechanical aspects of revolvers (and 1911s). Apparently, you believe if it doesn’t have the fewest parts and contain synthetic materials, such as plastic, it isn’t worthy of your time. Good enough! That leaves more for the rest of us who recognize an appreciate the attributes of these “antiques”.

      To qualify my statements, and to show you that I’m not just another old relic who is living in his past, I was a police officer for 37 years. About 30 of those years was spent in SWAT and as a firearms instructor. I started my career with revolvers, then went to semi-autos and then to plastic. Each of these systems had their own advantages and offered the user plenty of characteristics to like or dislike. I found that each had advantages and disadvantages compared to the next. So, in short, It’s OK to have your opinions, but don’t talk down to others who may or may not agree with you. This smacks of an armchair quarterback who watches the game, but can’t complete with those he’s watching. By the way, my daily carry in retirement is usually a polymer framed Glock, S&W or Sig, but may occasionally be a 1911 or J-frame S&W. I guess this depends on what the individual is comfortable and CONFIDENT with.

    • Lloyd A Smith January 3, 2020, 10:18 am

      As a FFL, I humor these self-appointed experts because they spend money. The ones that only blabber are gently walked outside with best wishes and thanked for coming by. Then left there wondering what happened. Unfortunately, too many of these experts influence new members to our community. The glock grip angle doesn’t point right for me so I don’t own one. I’ll get you one if you really want one, but I will first encourage you to look at a few quality pieces. Not everyone wants to be a Rambo or whoever the macho hero of this era might be. Some only want to enjoy the shooting sports or admire a quality piece for the work of art it can be. Thirty-three years as a FFL, I’ve only sold TWO glocks, but more Colts, S&W, and even Caniks, than I could possibly count. Be cautious of the “experts”. Its been my experience that those that talk the most saw the least action.

      • Don January 3, 2020, 12:48 pm

        Seriously, you sold two Glocks in 33 years as a gun dealer. You are not a very good gun dealer. People learn to shoot Glocks just like they learn to shoot 1911s. To serious users the Glocks are absolutely great guns. Once the muscle memory is established, picking up other guns feels odd. I learned that having a big assortment of guns may be fun for range and collecting, but is bad for defensive shooting. Once I found out how I had “learned the Glock”, I actually sold my M1911s, BHPs and concentrated on using the Glock for work. I still use S&W K-frame revolvers as they point well for me. Remember the old admonition of fearing a man with one gun (as he likely knows how to use it). Today in retirement I use Glocks, and S&W revolvers.

      • Peter Brown January 4, 2020, 3:41 pm

        Bravo!

      • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:43 am

        Well said, Lloyd.

    • No1hunter January 3, 2020, 10:23 am

      “pistol that takes forever to load?”

      Your ignorance is showing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • John Boutwell January 3, 2020, 10:40 am

      What ever!

    • David Frost January 3, 2020, 10:50 am

      Wow! Rather full of opinions and condemnation, aren’t we? As a police officer for 37 years with about 30 in SWAT and as a firearms instructor/range master, I’ve had a fair bit of experience with revolvers and autos. I started with revolvers, moved to autos and then to plastic. All had their advantages and disadvantages, buttons were without merit. Some folks prefer revolvers for any number of reasons. Others prefer autos, but I’ve known few, if any experienced “gun guys” who absolutely refused to recognize that both have their value.

      Revolvers and 1911s still hold a place in many peoples’ hearts. As a result, there is still a demand for handguns that are more than chunks of plastic and steel with fewer moving parts. So, contrary to your condemnation and pronouncement that we should all “think ahead”, many of us will continue to enjoy, and even carry these old “antiques”.

      In all honesty, in retirement I usually carry a polymer-framed semi in 9mm or. 45ACP, depending on what my desires are for the day. However, there are still days when I’ll carry and S&W J-frame or a 1911. I am confident in the guns and perfectly capable with them. I must say, your rant reminds me of an armchair quarterback; someone who can sit back and criticize others, but don’t have the experience or ability to have earned a place on the field.

    • Tim January 3, 2020, 10:58 am

      Slim, I do enjoy a young fellers take on a subject and I find yours to be most enlightening. Yep change is good and new technology is also good. Back in the day old men like myself strapped on revolvers, 1911’s and BHP’s to hunt down bad man. I don’t know how we managed to get it done with those tools. I still get out and qualify with retired and active officers and there have been many changes since I was active. The course has changed as back in my day we qualified out to 50 yds using a scoring target. Now days the max is 25 yds and a FBI Q target. Most of the guys, even a fair amount of the retired ones are carrying plastic or alloy autos of Glock, Sig or some other make. I Myself have resisted change in that area and still qualify with a 2-1/2″ Smith model 19 and a 1911. I have added heavy bifocals to my gear. I have noticed some other changes to. Every year I am amazed at the number of officers that have trouble qualifying on a Q target at 25 yards. The majority of the targets when we get back to 25 yards look like a shotgun target. I don’t understand how my old worn out, out dated guns and my old bifocals aided eyes still manage to out shoot every one the last three years and I consistantly had time on the clock at the end of each stage. Plus after the qualifying was all done just for giggles I still manage to qualify at the 50 yard line with that relic of a 2-1/2″ 19. Which I thought was really no big deal because it’s a big old Q target, but some of the guys seemed impressed. I don’t know maybe if we change the max range to 15 yards and get bigger targets those guys with those fancy guns will have less trouble.

      • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:39 am

        I was thinking the same thing! They just need bigger targets and they would do much better! My old 6″ Python is heavy these days – I didn’t get younger either – but for some reason I still manage to qualify, while most of them expensive looking autos have to be field-stripped and cleaned or fixed! Like you, Tim I sure am happy to get the “wisdom” of young guys like “Slim” to help me make the right choices! LOL!

    • smurf211 January 3, 2020, 11:13 am

      Can you spell “proof read” and “grammar check”? Only takes a few minutes. -hth

      • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:29 am

        LOL! NO KIDDING! Well said!

    • Sam Hernandez January 3, 2020, 11:13 am

      I think Gecko45 may have finally been released from prison and changed his handle.

    • David January 3, 2020, 11:19 am

      How about you first learn to use English correctly so that when you post your obviously ignorant opinions you at least won’t sound like someone who just crawled out of the hills for the fist time of the year to go get your tobaccy from the general store. Now that you’ve been corrected on your lack of grammatical skills let me help you with your obvious stupidity in the area of handguns. “Wheels” as you young prepubescent morons like to call revolvers are quite capable of many common roles in the handgun world. With the varied choice of capacities ranging from 5 to 8 round options they are excellent choices for homme defense, hunting, teaching newbies, truck guns and yes back up guns (especially when carried on the ankle or inside a pocket). I have nothing against Glocks or any reputable trustworthy weapon system but you truly need to grow up and research things a little more in depth before making yourself look like the bumbling backwoods idiot you appear to be.

      • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:27 am

        Well stated!

    • Nick Ball January 3, 2020, 12:48 pm

      As someone who owns and carries both at various times the semi auto/revolver debate is an on going discussion. A revolver is theoretically more reliable for 2 reasons. Firstly everything that happens is mechanical, so assuming a quality product that has not been abused when you pull the trigger it goes bang. The second part of the reliability comes from the ammunition, if there is a faulty round, you pull the trigger again and it fires, on a semi auto more action is required and it could be game over if the case has a fault and sticks in the chamber. With a semi auto the action relies on the recoil effect of the ammo to cycle and eject the case, so its not all mechanical in operation from the trigger so in theory there are more things that can prevent it working as it should. The big plus is potentially more rounds on board and a fast reload with the self contained magazine. Having said that the semi autos I own have worked flawlessly so far without issue so it’s down to perception of risk and what the individual is comfortable with. We all make that decision with what we carry for SD, how many rounds is enough?, how big a caliber? given few of us want to carry a big cumbersome handgun regularly. When it comes down to it if we knew when trouble would strike we wouldn’t be carrying a handgun as our primary weapon to start with, so it’s horses for courses. IMO revolvers are definitely the best SD handguns for people who are not very practical and are inclined not to practice as they should and that have weak hands that don’t grip slides well – my wife is in this category.

    • Mike in a Truck January 3, 2020, 2:02 pm

      Geez Slim back off on the Hi Test coffee Ol Pard. Not everything needs to be hi capacity. The fun of shooting a wheel gun is something that you should just try. If you handload ya dont have to chase your brass all over the place. Then have to wrestle the range rat kid that scarfs up every bodies empties. I have plenty of Smiths- but I dont have a Colt Python. I’m gettin one!

    • Mark January 3, 2020, 2:06 pm

      “So tell me how a wheel gun is more reliable than a GLOCK or one of the many other very reliable semi autos made in the last HUNDRED YEARS.”

      Sure. I’ll tell you. Watching my gun smith father repair 20 times as many semi-auto sidearms as revolvers in the last 50 years – Including Glocks. Could be something as simple as a weak mag spring or worn extractor. There you have it. And Yes, I trust my life to both semi-autos and revolvers.

      Sounds like you’re new to shooting, so here’s the X-factor on stovepipes and other assorted semi-auto ejection failures that you don’t get on revolvers (when your life depends on it). It’s not about how well or modern the firearms are designed and manufactured. Even with an out-of-box, perfectly functioning semi-auto, the cycling of rounds has some dependency on a firm stationary grip. In other words – you. Slide springs work based on the backstop of action. In a case where you are not drawing at the range, and don’t have the luxury of executing the perfect grip, if that 2nd or 3rd round does not chamber. . . It could very well be your fault. You won’t think it’s hilarious when that happens.

      All things being equal, this point of failure simply does not happen with revolvers. So if you have someone pointing a firearm at you and you’re sweaty, shaking or frozen, maybe all three, there is an “old reliable” sidearm design that WILL fire the next round if you pull the trigger or cock the hammer. Not matter what shape you’re grip is in. The posters below are speaking from experience.

      Also, if you have a friend attempting to fire a wheel gun in the shape you described above, please do them a favor and have the firearm repaired before range practice.

      • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:21 am

        Well stated!

    • nobody January 3, 2020, 8:58 pm

      “Did be needs fixed, too…”

    • Keith January 5, 2020, 7:17 pm

      Never had any of my revolvers fail. Many of the autos have been jam-o-matics right out of the box and others have been totally reliable.

      • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:19 am

        Same here!

    • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:18 am

      WOW! Your’ ignorance of firearms is astonishing! Maybe there IS a good reason to ban SOME people from owning them?? That is a LOT of opinion from someone who knows so little!

  • Ashley Day January 3, 2020, 5:43 am

    I hope they make a blue 3″ I’d pay that kinda price then but till then probly not

  • Me January 3, 2020, 5:38 am

    It would be nice for a royal blue one to come out. It seems however stainless steel is what Colt is making their guns in so would a blued one just be a coating on Stainless?

    • Don January 3, 2020, 12:59 pm

      They use stainless as it is cheaper to make. If there is a blemish in the casting it can be welded up and not need re-heat treating like a carbon steel gun.

  • Christopher Chason January 3, 2020, 5:31 am

    Best news I have had in years! I own two original Pythons, one a 1960s model and the other from the early 1970s; best firearms I have ever held in my hands! Needless to say, I WILL be purchasing one of these new production models! This is a dream-come-true!

    • Ejharbet January 3, 2020, 8:11 am

      You’re the one who’s opinion would be of most interest since you own and love the old ones.
      When you get the new one I’d like to read your take on them good or bad

      • Christopher Chason January 9, 2020, 6:05 am

        Rest Assured, brother! I WILL be sounding-off. 🙂

  • Chuck January 3, 2020, 5:28 am

    The Colt Python is a Machinery Masterpiece!

  • Christopher Walden January 3, 2020, 5:04 am

    Good article however I have heard that colt is NOT making the frame themselves and have outsourced the frame. Heard this is why the cobra took so long to come to market? Can you provide feedback or insight on this?

    • Don January 3, 2020, 1:02 pm

      That doesn’t surprise me at all. Colt just doesn’t seem to be in the gun making business anymore, I expected they’d be made overseas.

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