Remington’s Unique Pistol: The 700 CP Full Review

The Remington 700 CP (chassis pistol) is a new twist on an old classic. This new offering from Remington brings with it many opportunities for hunters and recreational shooters alike. Due to it being a pistol, in some states, this opens up opportunities in seasons that are closed to rifles while you still hold the edge of accuracy and range over other pistol hunters. On the contrary, recreational shooters, similar to myself, are looking for a way to make their next visit to the range more enjoyable and to challenge their skills. The Remington 700 CP is extremely versatile and a great offering from Remington for those who are able to see its value in their hands.

The Remington 700 CP is a bold new twist on an old classic. This is what you receive when you purchase one.

The 700 CP reminds me of Remington’s older bolt action pistol offering, the XP-100, which became very popular as a hunting pistol and even found its place in marksmanship competitions. I see the 700 CP as a newer, updated version of this forgotten classic. These updates include the ability to add a pistol brace with the buffer tube adapter and a detachable magazine, among other things, such as increased accuracy through modern production methods and a popular caliber offering.

First Impressions

I was fortunate enough to get my hands on one of the first 700 CPs out there, and I received one chambered for 308 Winchester. I chose this caliber because I have the versatility of full-powered, supersonic ammunition offerings as well as subsonic loads for quiet plinking. Upon unboxing, I saw that the Remington 700 CP is very modern and elegant in design. The chassis has been machined to have both defined edges as well as a sleek, flowing profile. The 10.5″ M-LOK handguard bolts onto the chassis, so it can be removed or swapped out. With an overall length of only 21.75″, this little package packs quite a punch and can be configured to your liking; for example, I chose to add a Shockwave brace and buffer tube from KAK Industries to fit my style of shooting.

For the purpose of testing the capabilities of the Remington 700 CP, and not my own, I installed a pistol brace, bipod, muzzle brake, and a quality optic.

About the Remington 700 CP

We’ll start at the back and move our way forward on this one. The number one detail that gets the most interest from those I have talked to is, “can it accept a buffer tube?” YES! The Remington 700 CP has a buffer tube delete plug at the rear that doubles as a QD sling attachment point and can be unscrewed with an Allen wrench, which exposes a threaded adapter for a buffer tube. This opens up many possibilities for the 700 CP, as you can attach a number of different pistol braces. Or file the correct paperwork, and upon approval, you can add an AR-style buttstock to have yourself a legal SBR.

You can remove the buffer tube delete plug and install a buffer tube, opening up many options for the configuration of your Remington 700 CP. I chose to install a KAK Industries Shockwave brace.

The 700 CP features a grip that I have come to love for both its fit in my hand, as well as tactility due to the stippled texture: the Magpul MIAD. There is also a storage compartment in this grip that comes in handy for storing tax stamp paperwork for suppressors and such. However, this grip can be swapped for your favorite, whatever it may be, because the 700 CP chassis accepts many AR style grips.

The Magpul MIAD grip is my preferred AR-style grip, so I enjoyed its pairing with the 700 CP. Also, note the paddle style magazine release.

The barreled action is basically identical to any other Remington 700’s, with the exception of the barrel and bolt knob. The trigger is an adjustable X Mark Pro, which can be adjusted for pull weight and sear engagement. The bolt knob on the 700 CP is an interchangeable, oversized tactical style for easy manipulation. This pistol comes with a one-piece 0 MOA Picatinny rail that is a bit longer than normal, providing plenty of room for whatever optic you want to mount, in whatever position you want to mount it in.

The bolt knob is an oversized, tactical style that makes for easy manipulations of the bolt.

The 700 CP comes with one 10 round magazine, a PMAG for the 308 and a .223 cal MDT magazine for the 223 Remington and 300 Blackout version. The magazine release is a paddle style release located between the magazine and the trigger guard. It is conveniently located to operate with minimal movement. It is also out of the way so it will not be operated incidentally. This gun comes fully decked out and ready to take to the range once you slap a scope on her/him/they/them.

As always, the included 10 round Magpul AICS style magazine-fed flawlessly.

The handguard is bolted onto the chassis using two hex head screws, creating a solid interface between the handguard and the chassis which allows you to bolt accessory optics to the handguard (I.E: night vision or thermal). The Handguard has M-LOK attachment slots down the length of it at the 2,3,4,6,8,10 and 12 O’Clock positions. The barrel on the 700 CP tapers down to a fairly thin profile, then it flares out at the muzzle to create a shoulder for accepting 5/8×24 threaded muzzle devices.

There are almost unlimited ways in which you could customize your handguard on the Remington 700 CP, thanks to the Magpul M-LOK system.

Performance and Accuracy

While using the Remington 700 CP, I did not run into any performance/reliability issues. This pistol proved itself to be extremely reliable as well as fun to shoot. Coupled with this, the short length created an incredibly useful and mobile firearm that had the capability to reliably engage targets at several hundred yards.

For my accuracy test, I mounted a KAK Industries Shockwave brace as well as a buffer tube in order to create a more stable unit through the implementation of a cheek weld and rear bag. I also used a Leupold Mark 5 HD 3.6-18×44 optic in order to aid in my precision. I chose to test this rifle on the 100 yard range because of the chambering (308 Winchester), despite its pistol status. My target’s actual range ended up being 115 yards, and I shot 3 different groups at this range using Buffalo Bore Ammunition’s Sniper 308 Win 175 Grain Sierra MK ammunition, Gorilla Ammunition’s 308 Win 175 grain Sierra MK ammunition and Prvi Partizan 155 grain HP BT ammunition. All of these performed similarly. My results are shown below:

Group location located in text box.

Specifications and Features (for 308 Win)

  • Remington Chassis and M-LOK Handguard
  • Threaded muzzle and protector
  • X Mark Pro adjustable trigger
  • Magpul MIAD pistol grip
  • Full Picatinny rail for optic mounting
  • 10 round mag
  • Rear single point QD sling adaptor
  • Large mag release latch
  • 12.5″ overall length
  • 10 + 1 capacity
  • 21.75″ overall length
  • 7.93″ overall height
  • 12.5″ barrel (.308 Winchester)
  • 6.15 pounds (.308 Winchester)
  • 3.5 – 5.5-pound trigger pull weight
  • hard coat anodized/black Cerakote finish
  • Magpul MIAD grip
  • MSRP $1,020.00
Of course, the muzzle on the Remington 700 CP is threaded 5/8-24 so you can install whatever muzzle device you would like on it.

Final Thoughts:

The Remington 700 CP is an extremely fun and versatile firearm to own, but inevitably, some of you will not see the value in it and that is ok. I found that this pistol was an extremely effective tool to carry in the vehicle for predator control because it takes up minimal space and has a respectable effective range. Another aspect that I loved about the 700 CP is the fact that it is built on the same action that I am already so familiar with. Also, due to this, there is a lot of aftermarket support for modifications if you wish to customize it down the road. I would recommend the 700 CP for anybody who was looking for a bolt action pistol because I think it is the best factory option.

The Remington 700 CP is a great little option for a truck gun, brush gun, stow-way bugout gun, and many other things. The endless ways that you can configure yours allows you to make it your own, to fit the role you need.

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More Pictures:

Into the belly of the beast.
Note the free-floated barrel.
Looking into the ejection port of the Remington 700 CP.
The magazine release, bolt release, and X Mark Pro Trigger.

About the author: Riley Baxter is an avid and experienced hunter, shooter, outdoorsman, and he’s worked in the backcountry guiding for an outfitter. He also get’s a lot of enjoyment out of building or customizing his firearms and equipment. Check out Riley’s Instagram @Shooter300

{ 11 comments… add one }
  • Anthony C Devich May 2, 2020, 12:03 pm

    I like to see Remington has not given up! This pistol will be a good steel slapper!

  • freddie February 17, 2020, 11:54 pm

    LOUD!

    • Keith A Burk March 31, 2020, 5:18 pm

      I use foam inner and muffs. Works great!

  • Nick February 17, 2020, 6:16 pm

    Not California legal

    • Anthony C Devich May 2, 2020, 12:04 pm

      Get people in office out there!

  • dave morgan February 17, 2020, 1:22 pm

    We buy a 1200$ ‘pistol’, add a brace, barrel heat guard, 800$ scope, trigger work, all to end up with a short barrel rifle?..Makes cents to me**************…Being partial, I add mit, like my rifles, use my pistols for de fence carry…So change my mind, what is the real need for a short barrel rifle for us folks who buy for need?

  • Bruce Allan Hall Willene Hall. February 17, 2020, 9:51 am

    I have owned the Savage Striker and it was in 308, also the Remington 221. Why not let it be a pistol and
    not go the short rifle game? If you are left handed the bolt on the right is OK but the Striker was much
    easier to use for me. I can love this in 6.5 as a hunting pistol.

  • Dennis February 17, 2020, 8:06 am

    Just a short Rifle. Why not make it in 45Colt. That would be a Pistol Round. Also the blot should be on the Left Side. I do not see much here, except using up some inventory. It might be a $500.00 gun.

    • Adam Jeppson February 17, 2020, 11:15 am

      Grin, I got a chuckle out of your typo. The blot should be on the right side. To quote Larry the cable guy: “That’s funny, I don’t care who you are”. Thanks for the chuckle.

  • Abe February 17, 2020, 7:57 am

    What is the barrels length and firearm overall wight?

  • James February 17, 2020, 6:31 am

    Would have been nice to actually mention the barrel length . ( even though it appears to be an inch longer that the m-lok handguard, and we can guesstimate from that . ) Twist rate ??

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