Strike Industries P320 Modular Chassis (PA Range Day 2021)

The Strike Industries P320 Modular Chassis is still in development but I was able to get my hands on a test version at Primary Arms Range Day

Pistol Caliber Carbines (PCC) are fun and consumers have several options. AR-15s chambered in 9MM, the CZ Scorpion, the Ruger PCC, and the Grand Power Stribog are all popular options. Some people don’t necessarily want a dedicated PCC and just want the ability to slide their sidearm of choice into a chassis that turns a handgun into something a bit more maneuverable. The most notable being CAA’s RONI and MCK chassis’ for Glock and other popular pistols.

The P320 MC is user-customizable, building off the commonly available SIG Sauer 320 FCU.

I’ve owned a RONI and while it’s a cool idea, the chassis simply feels flimsy and it was very apparent I was shooting a slip-on chassis versus a dedicated PCC. Well at Primary Arms Range Day I was fortunate enough to get hands-on with a prototype of the unreleased Strike Industries P320 MC (Modular Chassis).

The P320 MC is a smooth shooter and feels sturdy against the shoulder.

My first impression was, “Wow. This thing is rock solid. It feels like a dedicated PCC.” That’s because it’s built like one. The P320 MC is user-customizable from the ground up starting with a SIG 320 fire control unit (FCU) as a base. From there, buyers can choose from 15-20 different modular components to build their P320 MC in any configuration they like. Custom grips, charging handles, brace adapters, rail lengths, mag holders, and even different plate adapters.

SEE ALSO: A New Entry to the SIG Spectre Lineup (Primary Arms Range Day 2021)

Shooting the P320 MC was awesome. The model Strike Industries had available was equipped with a neat looped charging handle that was easy to manipulate. The P320 MC was sturdy, comfortable to shoot, and, as mentioned, exponentially customizable.

Hitting steel at 20 yards was a breeze. The P320 MC is still under QC and development and I did experience a single stovepipe in the 4 magazines I ran thru it but that’s all part of the process. The Strike Industries reps were quite receptive to feedback and I really applaud their willingness to take risks, something I wish the firearms industry would do more of.

This was easily my favorite product that I was able to test out at Primary Arms Range Day 2021. While pricing is still to be announced, it should be available for order by end of 2021. I will be eagerly keeping a close eye on this one and you should too. For more info, click HERE.

The P320 MC is still in development and I experienced a single stovepipe but otherwise, it ran well.

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About the author: CitizenHush is the Bob Ross of 2A Twitter. A Virginian by birth but Texan by the Grace of God, Mr. Hush enjoys firearms and firearm technology.Dislikes include: Strong opinions on Cast Iron skillets, politicians, and Brass Goblins. When he’s not blasting feral hogs in Central Texas, you can find him either on the range or living his best life as a suburban ranch hand.

{ 6 comments… add one }
  • John September 23, 2021, 2:55 pm

    Whoa, looks awesome, but how do you clear a stovepipe with that clearance/setup?

  • Jack Daughtry September 13, 2021, 6:33 pm

    The is why all of the trouble is rising. SBR when you shoulder it.

    • Kane September 17, 2021, 8:56 pm

      Where can I find in the US Constitution the part where restrictions are established on SBR’s?

      Maybe the NFA and subsequent GCA’s are the problem,

  • Doug Lash September 13, 2021, 1:23 pm

    The prototype pictured appears to have a vertical front fore grip. While you can see from the pictures how well that works, wouldn’t that classify the firearm wearing that chassis as an SBR? I thought that pistols were limited by the ATF to having a fore grips that were no more than 30 degrees off of the bore line?

    • CitizenHush September 13, 2021, 5:12 pm

      Idk I’m not a lawyer. But i wouldn’t worry too much about it. For all we know, it could have been registered as an SBR. It’s a silly law.

  • Steve in Detroit September 13, 2021, 8:05 am

    Why not make something like this for a Glock? Say a 1st gen G-21? I think there is a market for large G-20, 21 that are something like this, not a drop in but a dedicated lower that you could drop your slide & barrel onto that uses Glock parts.

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